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Found 19 results

  1. History The wind tunnel provision consisted essentially of four large high-quality research facilities, which would allow the testing of aircraft configurations and components at speeds from around eighty miles per hour up to a Mach number of 5, or five times the speed of sound. These were (in order of completion) the 3x3 supersonic tunnel, the 13x9 low speed tunnel, the 8x8 supersonic tunnel, and the 3x4 high supersonic speed tunnel (HSST). The numerals identify the working section dimensions in feet, width by height. The 8x8 and the 3x4 were the largest tunnels in their Mach number range in Western Europe. A low speed tunnel was also provided specifically to study the spinning characteristics of aircraft, which was a little understood phenomenon at the time. Explore Visited with my better half, @hamtagger. Now I had a bit of unfinished business with this little beauty! I first visited in May after seeing it pop up on the radar again and with it being just 8 miles from the area that I grew up, it was inevitable that I visited. It was hamtagger who had helped me with details back in May on the place. Going in May with someone who had no idea about this place, no idea about access, the location nor any history it was nice to come back feeling confident and knowing about what the site meant, what history it had and what exactly happened here. After leaving the site the last time and doing a report it was brought to my attention that there was a 3rd control room/observation room. Now there are 2 in the 8x8ft tunnel building and when I went one of the doors was locked so I missed out on that. I was set on seeing the 3x3 control room at some point. It just took some time, fast forward to July when me & @hamtagger were in the area again. We checked out the 8x8ft building and at that time it had a film crew there. We managed to sneak in to the control room that I had seen and hide behind the control panel for a little while. We left and checked out the building I had been told the 3rd room was in. Thanks to @darbians for his help, really really helpful It seemed that as much as it had been open it seemed pretty tight on this visit. We left it and decided to come back yet again. Since the July visit I have done some research on this place and seen that not only is there a 3x3ft supersonic windtunnel built, there was also a 3x4ft high supersonic wind tunnel built. This was quite confusing for me. Were they in the same building, were they in separate buildings?! Trying to tie up the interior of buildings with photographs I had seen on the internet was getting a bit anal. The vertical spinning tunnel is still in use at the flight centre and the largest wind tunnel is used by RedBull Racing. Fast forward to November and we decided to check it out yet again, arriving really early was the key here. Entry wasn't hidden and the later it become it would have become impossible with the amount of people around. Needless to say and I couldn't quite believe it but we were in! Greeted by this lovely corridor, wooden parquet flooring and lots of peeliness. After 5 minutes, there it was.. This little room we had both wanted to see. Walking in everything was tinged with a greeny blue, a colour I associated to the military infact. It is a shame people go to some lengths to get in places, we found the wood that had been used to secure the door to the room pulled off and on one side the whole doorframe had been pulled off. I was pretty impressed by the whole building to be honest, it was somewhere I had really wanted to see and it didn't disappoint. The decay in some areas was really nice and natural and in others looked like there was nothing. Some of the building is quite open to view of those on site so had to be careful when taking a few pics. The areas where the windtunnel was had some nice little features left behind, which was nice to see. As much as it pains me to say,I still think I have unfinished business with this place. I am sure there is more here, infact one of the other buildings that housed another control room is in use as a company so time will tell I guess. Anyway, on with the pics. I loved this, the fact that it says 'Required Attitude'... None, fuck off! This little tag stood the test of time for 45 years! And a selfie to finish the report...
  2. Found this looking for Hartwood Hospital in Scotland. Some history from Wikipedia "The remains of Hartwood Hospital, a 19th-century psychiatric hospital with imposing twin clock towers, are the main feature of the village, even after its closure under the direction of the Lanarkshire Health Board in 1998. On the morning of 28 June 2004, a fire broke out in the disused Hartwood buildings. This involved the destruction of the admin offices, dining hall and clock towers. After it closed in 1998, it was used as a studio by Lanarkshire Television, but Lanarkshire Television was closed down in 2002. After LTV left, the hospital fell victim to vandalism and fire. Security men regularly patrol the site to fend off vandals. Hartwood Hospital Nurses Home was designed by Glasgow Architect James Lochhead in 1926. It was designed to blend in with the 1890's Baronial style Hartwood Mental Hospital, located on the same site, and was originally built as Nurses Accommodation for the Hartwood Nursing staff. It was finally opened in 1931. It was decsribed as a Baronial-style nurses residential home. It is a Category C listed building. In 1974, the Scottish Western Region's Hartwood School of Nursing was based here and trained the vast majority of nurses, who then initially practiced in the area. It was latterly home to the Bell College of Technology School of Nursing and Midwifery. The building was officially vacated in 1996." Inside it was dry but the was rot in the floor. I went to go down the main staircase, put my hand on a post that held the hand rail, and the whole thing slowly rocked forwards then back into place! F-That! This is the offending post! Not much to talk about really. Just room after room of the same. Shame they let all these old buildings go to waste!
  3. http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/man-found-dead-cambridge-street-9661663 Sad to read, hope it wasn't anyone from the community. Please, stay safe out there
  4. Hello all, Leeds from above in various locations, styles and quality thanks to Facebook Enjoy!! Thanks for looking
  5. See the full story here. http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/11886023.__90_000_cash_found_under_bed_at_derelict_house___by_firefighters_about_to_set_fire_to_it/?ref=trn So what would you do in this situation? The moral compass is kicking in regarding balencing up the rights and wrongs of it all. Then end game being do you tell the missus of the find and slip her a few quid? Or do you make a run for it lol. Oh well back to sport and all that
  6. UK British gas building Jan-15

    Something a little bit different this time, been here a few times now and the view still takes my breathe away. Its great to have something like this so close to home and as an added bonus the security guard turned up just as we were leaving which saved us a climb The recent fire there hasn't really done much damage to the inside but there is nothing really worth seeing in there hence the lack of photos but please enjoy. Thanks guys !!!!!
  7. Adders and extreme_ironing were subjected to a lethal case of flatulence on this fine night, I had previously eaten 7 packets of beef flavoured space raiders, a jacket potato with cheese, several crackers and cheese, and some Japanese ramen. A few sips of lager were enough to cause some kind of chemical reaction inside me and the effects were horrifying. They tried to escape the smells by climbing up this crane to get away from me, but I was too nimble and followed them up there. They will forever suffer in silence for what happened that night. Here are a few shots, these contractors are working on several sites in the area worth keeping an eye on at the moment. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Thanks for looking
  8. according to wiki 21'st highest building in Leeds; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_buildings_and_structures_in_Leeds
  9. First post on the forums use the Facebook page a bit so thought i'd put a report up on here look forward to chatting to you all! Headed over to York this morning to have a look at terry's and was pleasantly surprised to find that secca was nowhere to be seen, had the place to ourselves for a good few hours making our way through the factory building and the admin as the tower is tighter than a nuns cun*. Only got pictures from the admin but I'm eager to go have another look round here, the skylight and stairs are awesome! History The Chocolate Works was the confectionery factory of Terry’s of York, England. Opened in 1926, it closed in 2005 with the loss of 300 jobs, with production moved to other Kraft Foods sites in mainland Europe. Today, the site is being redeveloped as a mixed-use residential/commercial real estate development. In 1923, Frank and Noel Terry joined the family business, Terry’s of York. They revamped the company, launching new products and bought a site in York on which to develop a new factory. Built in an Art Deco style, the factory known as The Chocolate Works included a distinct clock tower. Opened in 1926, new products including the Chocolate Apple (1926), Terry’s Chocolate Orange (1931), and Terry’s All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. With the onset of World War II, confectionery production was immediately halted. The factory was taken over by F Hill’s and Son’s of Manchester as a shadow factory, to manufacturer and repair aircraft propeller blades. With the factory handed back to the company post-war, production was difficult due to rationing and limited imports of raw cocoa. As a result, in 1954 production of the chocolate apple was phased out in favour of increased production of the chocolate orange. In 2004, Kraft Foods decided to switch production of remaining products All Gold and Chocolate Orange to factories in Belgium, Sweden, Poland and Slovakia, and close the plant.[4] The factory closed on 30 September 2005. Bought by developers Grantside, they consulted local people on how to develop the site, renamed The Chocolate Works. Their initial proposed development was rejected by the City of York Council. In February 2010, with the Grade II listed Time Office and Art Deco clock tower secured and scheduled for refurbishment and despite objections from the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment,the firm was given planning permission for a £165million mixed-use of residential, commercial and leisure.The eventual scheme is projected to create more than 2,700 new jobs in new and refurbished offices, two hotels, shops, bars, cafés and restaurants, over 250 homes, a nursery, care home and medical centre. Redevelopment started in 2011, with removal of asbestos by trained and certified contractors, followed by demolition of non-scheduled buildings in early 2012. In April 2013, the site was acquired by joint developers Henry Boot Developments and David Wilson Homes. Thanks for reading have a happy new year!
  10. Morning all, just another rooftop report I'm afraid, bit of a special one this though. By no means am I the first to do it and I'm sure I won't be the last. I visited with extreme_ironing first time round when I took these shots and second time with a certain group of drunk explorers which was eventful to say the least The Lloyd's building (sometimes known as the Inside-Out Building) is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior. Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by English Heritage to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch". 1. The current Lloyd's building was designed by architect Richard Rogers and built between 1978 and 1986. Bovis was the management contractor. Like the Pompidou Centre in Paris (designed by Renzo Piano and Rogers), the building was innovative in having its services such as staircases, lifts, electrical power conduits and water pipes on the outside, leaving an uncluttered space inside. The 12 glass lifts were the first of their kind in the United Kingdom. The building consists of three main towers and three service towers around a central, rectangular space. The Lloyd's building is 88 metres (289 ft) to the roof, with 14 floors. On top of each service core stand the cleaning cranes, increasing the overall height to 95.10 metres (312 ft). Modular in plan, each floor can be altered by addition or removal of partitions and walls. The building was previously owned by Dublin-based real estate firm Shelbourne Development Group, who purchased it in 2004 from a German investment bank. In July 2013 it was sold to the Chinese company Ping An Insurance in a £260 million deal. 2. Pipe porn 3. stair Porn 4. 5. 6. 7. The Willis building 8. 9. 10. Window cleaner's box 11. Cleaner's crane 12. 13. Extreme_ironing doing the stuff that I don't have the bottle to do! 14. Plant Room 15. 16. Looking down on Gotham City below Thanks for looking
  11. I found this building by chance. Was out walking with my camera, and there it was. Ready for demolition, and comletely stripped except for two pianos and a pile of electrical stuff. I'm not sure, but I think it was built in the 1800ds as a warehouse and offices thingy. 5 stories, bricks. Close to the harbor. I think it's been abandoned for a while, and with quite a few squatters recent years. Got a couple of hours. Went back a few days later for more shots, but they'd started the demolition. And they'd startet with the staircases. Building now gone.
  12. .Merseysides Oldest building. I had watched the scaffold going up at this place and was itching to get up there if only to look into cammel lairds ship builders next door The History The history of Birkenhead priory goes back beyond Victorian years. The oldest standing building on Merseyside, Founded in 1150, the monks of this Benedictine monastery looked after travellers for nearly 400 years and supervised the first regulated 'Ferry 'cross the Mersey'. The tower of St Mary's, the first parish church of the town, shares the site which is now dedicated as a memorial to those lost in the 1939 disaster aboard the Laird's built submarine Thetis. I made two visits here as the scaffold got higher, the first visit was made alone and the second visit was made with SAt (simon) and it was so windy that the whole thing was moving...I was cacking it. Ok, so the real appeal was the fact that this priory is situated in an elevated position overlooking a ship yard and the idea was to get some pictures of the ships in dry dock but the anticipation was decidedly laclustre, anyway on with the pictures firstly a shot from google showing the dry docks that got me so enthused, you can see the Priory right next to the shipyard The priory and St marys tower Merseysides OLDEST building all scaffed out on my first visit and on my second visit topped off to the spire. it dont look high but shitty death when you get up there it is brown troos time especially in the wind. One of the St Marys clocks minus its hands On my first visit here there was a Manx ferry in dry dock getting some sonar dome work done. On my second visit there was a naval ship in the same dry dock and also looks like a sonar dome job it was so large that I couldnt even fit it in using my 10mm But it looked like a sonar dome job too The smaller dry dock was empty on my first visit but in the background you can see Liverpool and the Anglican Cathedral On my second visit I was pleased to see a tall ship and a tug in the smaller dry dock One of the monster cranes in the shipyard Close up of the Bridge of the manx ferry Birkenhead tunnel entrance from the priory and the end of the large dry dock and a crop of the small dry dock Grupo shot. It is so good to see Cammell Lairds Busy again thanks for looking
  13. I managed to explore the building the day before it was fenced off in preparation for demolition. The building you are about to see was built in 1953 and opened in 1954. Abandoned in June 2010 and demolished in August 2010, but here are some pictures of the exploration:
  14. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.
  15. Go in over a dual carriage way back home the other day I spotted this building and a must explore just ate away at me all that day, so off I tootled back the day after to have a shufti !, no cctv big smashed open window and grass growing out of the roof ! reet nice sized building with a come in and explore look to it, over the gate n I'm off all guns blazing like a kid let loose in a sweet shop all over it like a bad rash of space mumps..... Some history on this place..... Elland-cum-Greetland Gas Company, Established on 6th May 1836. Managers have included Robert Dempster (1850) and James Bridge (1941). Robert Dempstar (1829-1913) Scot from Cupar, Fife. He worked as an engineer and manager of the Elland-cum-Greetland Gas Company from 1850. He was one of the first members of the British Association of Gas Managers and an associate member of the Institute of Civil Engineers. His consultancy work advising local textile manufacturers on the building and running of their own small gas plants led to the establishment of Dempster's in 1855, specialising in the production of gas retorts and gasholders at their Rosemount Iron Works, Elland. In 1877, he wrote a 32-line song entitled The Good Old Gas-Light Company. He was retired by 1881, but continued to buy or build gas works from his retirement home in Penmaenmawr. He married Elizabeth (1826-18??) also from Cupar and had 5 children. James Bridge (1877-1941) was an Engineer and Manager of the Elland-cum-Greetland Gas Company (1941) This is all the history of this bloke I could find. Tom Turner. (1863-192?) Of Victoria Street, West Vale, A short history ! On 31st January 1923, he and his wife, Annie (1867-1922), were found unconscious in their bed. They were found by the police who had been alerted when Mr Turner failed to show up for work,They died later in Royal Halifax Infirmary. It was suspected that the couple had left the gas on low, because Mr Turner was suffering from cold and bronchitis. During the night, the Elland Gas Company reduced gas pressure in the area, which would have been sufficient for a small light to go out. You don't expect this next shot in a run down building full of pots n pans catchin water coming in through the roof ! Some poor family has had is 'ard' ere going by kids toys left all over the place. I was highly motivated to do the 'Monty Python Sketch' of a naked bloke playing a piano but i wont post that pic ere as i might get booted for bad taste ! Some nice cast iron work. Well I made my way back out via the broken window and back to the footpath along side of this building and I just took my last shot when a 4wd came towards me with a big bloke saying have you seen anyone in the building, my reply had to be no as I didn't see anyone.......(but me haha), then he started yapping on about a silent alarm n went off unlocking the gate I had just volted and then I was off....done n dusted ......2 mins more in the building n i'd av had a nice game of hide n seek !.
  16. Well a quick trip but don't know what to make of the building !, old big house, mansion or poss small old nursing home !!!!! no history to be found even off the old drunk outside the bath hotel pub ! it's in the early stages of re development so on with the pic's
  17. UK Old building.... 2011

    Bugger me well nice building but I've no history or name.....me bad or WHAT !!! sorry peeps...
  18. bit of a random find not really sure about the history of this place so if anyone noes let me no and ill add it in
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