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Found 6 results

  1. The Explore This was a revisit for all of us, heard the place was open again and had been over 12 months since we'd seen it and heard it wasn't doing well so thought we'd pop in and have one last look... sadly this place seems to be way beyond saving now and surely will fall down if its not pulled down soon.. Hope the pics give an idea of what its looking like now anyway Visited with @Vulex and two non-members The History Originally called the Empire Theatre of Varieties, this theatre opened in Burnley in 1894 with capacity to seat 1935 people. Funded by the Directors of the Victoria Opera House Limited. In 1995 the building became abandoned and has rapidly deteriorated both internally and externally. In 2013 it was reported that the owners of the Empire Theatre were given 8 weeks to make emergency repairs mainly to the exterior which was thought to be at risk of partial collapse onto nearby footpaths. However it does not appear that anyone from the Lancashire Theatre Company (the registered owners) have come forward to claim ownership.
  2. We had a few failed places but then got in this place. Nice place but smelt a bit. History - Originally called the Empire Theatre of Varieties, this theatre opened in Burnley in 1894 with capacity to seat 1935 people. Funded by the Directors of the Victoria Opera House Limited. In 1995 the building became abandoned and has rapidly deteriorated both internally and externally. In 2013 it was reported that the owners of the Empire Theatre were given 8 weeks to make emergency repairs mainly to the exterior which was thought to be at risk of partial collapse onto nearby footpaths. However it does not appear that anyone from the Lancashire Theatre Company (the registered owners) have come forward to claim ownership.
  3. Visited this one with telf. Gronk and woopashoopaa was a nice little explore but be warned the floors here are like walking on memory foam matress. Managed to cover the whole theatre and up onto the roof. The a box of section at the back of the theatre that had benches that looked really old. The theatre was really dark so struggled for light. So here's a few I did get they not the best and a little history.. Bingo moved out of the theatre in 1995, and it was statutory listed Grade II in February 1996. By 1997 the disused upper level already showed signs of fairly extensive water penetration. The more immediate risk seemed, however, to be that it would be sold for some highly profitable non-theatre activity, removing a splendid building from any prospect of a return to its designed use. There was much local pressure to reopen the theatre and the local authority and The Theatres Trust contributed to the cost of a feasibility study. However, the theatre remained empty and unused. There are now serious fears of possible demolition as a result of neglect. The theatre's frontage is somewhat obscured by an adjacent development and it is only the rear of the auditorium which has a public face. This is narrow and rendered, with evidence of original mouldings and panels. Its main entrance is on St James’s Street, a shopping street. A long and narrow entrance and foyer lead to the auditorium. The frontage is clad in sheet panelling. The auditorium is elaborately detailed with robust and richly formed plasterwork in the Classical style. As reconstructed by Crewe in 1911, it has two slightly curved wide and deep balconies, terminating in superimposed stage boxes framed between massive Corinthian columns supporting a deep cornice. Segmental-arched proscenium, with richly decorated spandrels and heraldic cartouche. Side walls feature plaster panels, pilasters and drops. Flat, panelled ceiling with circular centre panel and central sun burner. Restrained heraldic and Greek plasterwork on balcony and box fronts. Three boxes and the upper balcony have been partitioned off. If the theatre was to be restored to use, the narrow stage would need to be extended and front of house would need improvement. In May 2013, the council considered the building to be dangerous, requiring demolition and works to ensure safety. Few roof shots
  4. Burnley Empire, Northern Trip Part 1 So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. So I arrived in Manchester on the Friday night and off to Burnley we went to explore the “Empire†Sadly a mixture of the lens wobble fault and getting to grips with my new lens meant my photos aren’t what they could be. Sadly daylight had faded by the time we got inside… The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show. Back in 1894 it seated 1,935 people. James Pringle took over in 1909. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe who decreased seating to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but it soon reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. In December 1958; The Empire was sold to the Star Cinemas chain. Soon after this; it became a bingo club when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. Operated by Gala Bingo until its eventual 1995 closure; The future of one of Burnley’s most historic theatres is under threat after falling into a “dangerous†state. Council officials have erected safety fencing around the Grade II listed building. The Empire has been named in the Theatre Trust’s top 10 at risk theatres in Britain since 2006. The “unknown†owners have been issued with a court summons over the condition of the property which officials papers said was “dangerous and requiring part demolition and works to ensure safety.†The future of the 120 year old building is unknown, but it doesn’t look good. I neglected to take any externals so here is one used with permission of True_British_Metal. – March 2013 Onto My pics – September 2013 Northern Trip Part 2 – George Barnsley and Sons (Sheffield) More At: Burnley Empire - a set on Flickr
  5. Visited this location a couple of times, once solo and once with - Host The Empire Theatre in Burnley was built for W. C. Horner of the Victoria Opera House in Burnley and designed by the architect G. B. Rawcliffe, who had previously designed the Victoria Opera House in Burnley. The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. In 1909, it was taken over by James Pringle and films were then part of the programme. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe and seating increased to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. New owners took over and it was converted into Burnley’s ‘Superior Talkie Theatre’. Some use was made of the stage over the years, but it was mainly now used as a cinema. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. Sold to the Star Cinemas chain in December 1958, it became a bingo club in the mid-1960’s, when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. The last use of the stage at the Empire Theatre was on 29th October 1966, after a weeks run of the Burnley Light Opera Company production of “The Merry Widow”. In the 1990’s it became a Gala Bingo Club, and remained so until they moved to a purpose built bingo club in another part of town in 1995. The Empire Theatre was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage in 1996. Here in 2013, the building still stands unused. .. ..
  6. did this about 4 years ago originally, and to say the least access was mission impossible style back then! so this time round it was a bit easier! all photos from this month. History:-The Empire Theatre of Varieties was opened on 29th October 1894. It was designed by architect G.A. Rawcliffe, and could seat 1,500 in orchestra stalls, dress circle and gallery levels. In 1909, it was taken over by James Pringle and films were then part of the programme. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe and seating increased to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. New owners took over and it was converted into Burnley’s ‘Superior Talkie Theatre’. Some use was made of the stage over the years, but it was mainly now used as a cinema. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. Sold to the Star Cinemas chain in December 1958, it became a bingo club in the mid-1960’s, when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. The last use of the stage at the Empire Theatre was on 29th October 1966, after a weeks run of the Burnley Light Opera Company production of “The Merry Widowâ€. In the 1990’s it became a Gala Bingo Club, and remained so until they moved to a purpose built bingo club in another part of town in 1995. The Empire Theatre was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage in 1996. In 2011, the building still stands unused. as you can see this has a new wall fitted it was hining the cheap seats on the roof
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