Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'cambridge'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 19 results

  1. History Radio interferometry started in Cambridge in the mid-1940s, with funding provided by Mullard Limited and the Science Research Council. Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is located at Lord’s Bridge, Cambridgeshire, was founded by Sir Martin Ryle, an English radio astronomer, and was opened by Sir Edward Victor Appleton, an English physicist, in 1957. Altogether, the entire site comprises several large aperture synthesis radio telescopes; some of these include the ‘one-mile telescope’, the ‘5km Ryle Telescope’ and the ‘Arcminute Microkelvin Imager’. The site this report is based on; an active telescope, is known as the AMI Large Array (the antennas of the Archminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array). This section of the facility is made up of ‘eight 12.8 metre diameter, equatorially mounted parabolic antennas’ (whatever that means) which were formerly part of the Ryle Telescope. Each of the antennas are separated by distances which range between 18 and 110m. This particular piece of equipment, including all of the antennas, was built by the Cavendish Astrophysics Group. It was designed to study galaxy clusters ‘by observing secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background arising from the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect’… which obviously makes perfect sense to us laypeople. In other words, then, the AMI array is used to observe radiation, particularly that with frequencies between 12 and 18 GHz. The telescopes can, therefore, be used to determine the masses and temperatures of certain known galaxy clusters. We could go on, seeking more answers about the universe, electrons, kinematic effects, cosmic microwave background radiation and inverse Compton scattering, but my knowledge acquired from the internet is dwindling fast… Our Version of Events Now for something a little more understandable. It was raining heavily as we approached Cambridge, so heavy in fact the rain was bouncing off the road as if it were hailstone. This didn’t stop us from noticing, and quickly admiring, those tidy thatched roofed houses you folk have down below our northern borders mind. We realised, of course, that we can only dream of such things as we rolled through the various quaint villages of Cambridgeshire in our small sort-of-orange-coloured three door wader-smelling Toyota. After driving past it twice – quite clearly the low lying cloud must have obscured our visibility – we eventually spotted the Mullard Observatory from the roadside. Wasting no more time we peddled our beasty little orange machine into a grassy verge as fast as we could. It was too slight and slender to sink in the mud, and bold enough for other drivers to notice, so we concluded we were fine to park there. From the road, though, we faced our biggest challenge of the day: a gruelling field crossing. Normally us Northerners are used to a bit of farmland, but we found these flat Southern plains incredibly flat and wet. Our trainers squelched loudly as we plodded through mud and rather large puddles which are conspicuously missing in all our photographs. “This wouldn’t happen in our fields” we grumbled to one another; we understand the concept of a hill. All in all it was a miserable experience. Eventually we reached the other side of the very flat field. We’d battled the elements and had paid the price. We were soaking. With nothing left to lose we made our way up to the fence line of the observatory and, ignoring the CCTV signs and other terrifying deterrents, found a way into the site to seek shelter beneath the giant dishes. At that point in time I was less impressed that these structures can detect cosmic radiation, I was simply thankful they’re shaped a little like giant umbrellas. We tried out best to grab a few decent shots, but decided to leave again after ten minutes due to the weather. Originally we had intended to have a wee climb up a couple of the antennas. At the time, however, our decision was unanimous: “fuck that shit”. There was none of our usual fannying around on our return to the car; for once we arrived somewhere earlier than we’d anticipated. And that, then, concludes our twenty minute stop off in Cambridge: it’s wet, muddy, flat, has nice thatched rooves and a sweet observatory. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Box and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13:
  2. Hi guys been a year and i haven't even posted this one this was a fun splore to do, went with @Miss-Anthrope. And the journey began leaving the house at 5 in the morning on a cold winter day to get to this place (the ''Bleeding doors'' were priority today) we arrived at 7:30 managed to see security doing the morning patrol so we waited in the car until we couldn't see him and presumed he had finished his job for the morning, we then climbed the hill and guess who was coming out the door.......................................................... that's right the security guard (being way to thorough for my liking), but lucky for us he had his back to us and was turned around locking a door. We ninja'd past him and into the building we knew where the access point was and we were going right on track until wait oh, bugger its sealed!! After another little scout, and my eagle eye, there was another way! leg ups, a bit of mud and a squeeze but in we go..... Hope you enjoy the pics I wont bore you with the history as this place has been done a lot. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 2nd time we see this guy 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. hope you enjoy it
  3. The History I don't think there's a need to add this bit, everyone knows this old chestnut! The Explore Myself, Vixxie & Upright Ninjer began our travels early one Saturday morning. We knew this explore was going to be a bit of a gamble, as we only had a half baked idea of an entry point, the fact that this one was part of a live site made things that bit more precarious. We pulled up in a discrete location, kitted up & made our way through the housing area in search of our way in. As we were walking through I knew we were close, as I could see the clock tower of the main building, silhouetted in the moonlight. This got us fired up & we pushed on to get out of sight before it got light. We searched around for what seemed like ages, & each of the possible entry points that I had earmarked from Google maps had drawn a blank. We were running out of options, & clutching at straws I suggested that we try a possible way through (won’t go into any details there). I hopped over some cast iron railings, which had some of the sharpest, nastiest spikes on them. I made my way through the hoards of bushes & brambles, & sure enough I saw what looked like a way onto the site. After we all got over, & after a rather creative means of entry we were in. At this point we were on edge, as we had heard all sorts of stories about the site being guarded by Ghurkas. We treaded carefully over to the entry point, which on closer inspection was up more of a challenge than what I had seen on the “how to” video I had seen on YT (I shit you not, someone posted an entry video). I was sceptical as to whether it would be still be open, & low & behold, it was sealed up. Word to the not so wise, there are people other than explorers that view these vids. It’s not a good idea to disclose said information via social media, all it does is gets places locked up! We weren’t having much luck, with every window & door being firmly barred. Not wanting to be walking along a long exposed path, we decided to duck into a little side building for a while. Nothing really worth looking at in there, we had a mooch about & went back down the side of the building. We got to the corner & quickly realised that we weren’t alone on site! In a Secca type office across from where we were, there was a group of demolition workers getting a briefing from their manager. Knowing that we were basically pinned down, I decided to take a look at a possible route past down by the mortuary. I worked my way through yet more brambles, & after a fashion I found a way through. I wanted to take a look at the mortuary building as well, but after seeing what a fucked condition it was in, I soon moved on. On making my way back I heard an almighty siren going off. I picked up the pace to get back to Vixxie & Ninjer to find out what had happened. Turns out it was the “get to work horn”, like the opening scene to the Flintstones! As soon as that happened the place was a scene of activity, with one guy getting into a grabber type vehicle which began pulling apart the building we were stood next to. Tracing my steps back to the mortuary, we chose our moment & made a break for it around the side. We made it past the workers & into a hole in the side of the Maternity building. Not knowing whether we were alone here, & from a past “letting our guard down too quickly” fail, we treaded very cautiously. Turns out it was pretty alright, with most of our noises being shrouded by the guys tearing buildings down nearby. We found one of the classic rooms, & began taking shots of the lamps of other bits of tasty decay. I took an interest to an area that had been cordoned off, with some rather nice looking foliage growing inside. I failed to notice the area beneath my feet which was marked in green paint. On standing on it, my bodyweight caused it to sink. Ninjer turned around to me & warned “Don't you stand on that!” As we made our way through the place we found whole areas that were basically off limits, with green spray across the floor in large patches. After exhausting all of the goodies that the upper floor had to offer, we made our way downstairs. Walking the corridors, I noticed a feature I recognized but I didn’t know where from. There were streaks of paint running down the windows & panels, in shades of red & copper. Then it hit me, the bleeding doors! I opened up the double doors to find a blank room, to which I was rather puzzled by. It was only when I took a step in the room that I looked back & found them, quite easily missed. Along one of the long passageways we found our way into another of the buildings. It wasn’t all that interesting, with a lot of the rooms looking pretty much the same. We did find a black board which had a list of all the usual suspects scrawled across it in chalk. We wanted to add our own little bit to it, but could we find any chalk......could we bollocks! We stopped in here & had a spot of lunch, before making our way out. We made a decision at this point to call it a day, as the way around the front had workers pacing about, & we didn’t fancy turning what was a nice explore into a nasty confrontation which Secca. We didn’t get to see everything, but we had a laugh & got some good shots, which is a win in my book. The Photos 01) 02) 03) 04) 05) 06) 07) 08) 09) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15) 16) 17) 18) 19)
  4. As I was going passed Cambridge on a recent trip down south I thought I'd have a look at this place as I understand it's not going to be around for long. Solo mooch this one and was unfortunately not in here long and managed to miss all the best bits. It started with a cavalier entry with the surrounding area being busier then I would have liked. Not long into the place I came across a load of yellow strip lighting used on building projects and they where all switched on. Cracked on as all seemed to be quite, but was now on edge about the lights being on. This and the cavalier entry started to get the better of me as a went in circles around the part I was in thinking this was not such a good idea. Suddenly a heard a siren going passed out side and I was gone. No police turned up in the end but I was glad to be out. Looking at the reports since I have been back I'm gutted that I did not compose myself more and soldier on but, when panic sets in on a solo it's hard to see reason. HISTORY The Evelyn Trust was established as a charity in 1920, when it owned and managed The Evelyn Hospital in Cambridge. In 2003 the Trust sold the hospital and invested the funds to support “the relief of sickness, the preservation and protection of health for the public benefit and the promotion of medical research and education within the City of Cambridge, the University of Cambridge or Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge or otherwise in the surrounding areas.†A history of the hospital was published in 2005. ‘A wonderful thing for Cambridge – the Evelyn Hospital 1921 to 2003’, was written by Sheila Mann. A well-known and well-loved local institution, the Evelyn Nursing Home was founded in 1921 by C Morland Agnew as a consequence of his wife Evelyn having undergone an unpleasant stay in another Cambridge nursing home. For many years the only Cambridge nursing home to possess an operating theatre, the Evelyn also opened its doors to medical, maternity and psychiatric patients and to residents. Following an ambitious programme of modernisation and development instigated by Morland Agnew’s grandson Julian Agnew in 1974, the Evelyn decided to specialise in the care of acute medical and surgical cases – a programme for which it was well equipped, thanks to its close ties with Addenbrooke’s Hospital and with the Cambridge medical fraternity. In 1983 it was renamed the Evelyn Hospital as a reflection of its new status. Further developments in the 1980s and 1990s allowed it to establish itself as a busy acute private hospital with a reputation for high standards of medical and nursing care. However, the problems of running a standalone hospital in the changed environment of private medical care in the twenty-first century were considerable, and in order to ensure its continuing future, the hospital was sold to the Nuffield Hospitals Group in 2003. 1 2 3/4 5 6 7 8/9 10 11 12 13 14 15/16 17 18 Thanks For Looking
  5. En route back from RAF Upwood we decided to stop by Cambridge’s Regional War Room, aka RSG4 after developing a somewhat large fascination of bunkers. I was almost not going to bother uploading this due to a lack of pictures and lack of entry at all, however as there are no reports on this place at all anyway here is what I did get along with some history on the place…
  6. UK RAF Upwood - Cambridge - July 2015

    A bit of history that for once I did NOT steal ..... well from anyone on here History Since 1982, the Nene Valley Gliding Club [1] has conducted its glider operations from a field that occupies the site of the old runways. Initially these operations were under an agreement with the Ministry of Defence. However, in 1995 the club was told they would need to find a new home as the land was going to be sold off. The club was unable to locate a suitable new home and was preparing for the possibility of having to close when the purchaser of the land, Marshal Papworth, agreed to lease the land to the club for 10 years. This has allowed the club to continue flying from Marshals Paddock (so named by the club after their benefactor's death in 2000). Much of the RAF Upwood is unused, closed by the Ministry of Defence in 1994. Most of the station was vacated and the land and buildings sold off to civil ownership. Upwood is also the home of No. 511 (Ramsey) Squadron Air Training Corps who have been on the site since the early 70s. Originally housed in the old fire station the squadron moved to a number of buildings before settling in the old nissen hut church building. When the station was closed by the MOD in 1995, the squadron moved to the Upwood school. The squadron finally settled into the present building inside the fence in 1997. In 2004 Turbine Motor Works purchased a large amount of property on the former base including the four C-type hangars. Their plan is to convert the property into a state-of-the-art jet engine overhaul facility. Together with the Nene Valley Gliding Club and the Air Cadet Squadron, this facility will ensure that the former RAF base will continue its aviation legacy well into the 21st century. Part of the facility is now used by paintballing players. The explore Visited with my better half, Hamtagger After quite a nice day mooching about we rocked up to Upwood in the early evening, it was a beautiful day. The sun was still beating and it must have been half 7!! Got in and soon found out it was going to be a very leisurely explore. We scaled up the many buildings and started making our way around the site. A lot bigger than I expected to be honest. I did expect the level of trashing though as I had seen in various other reports. We made our way to the medical centre as had seen those lamps, considering I'd seen reports from January this year not looking too bad I was shocked at just how trashed it was. Never mind, it made for a few decent pics. We left there and headed for the tower to get some pics from above.. Now I am not usually one for climbing but I was all game for this, was even ready to go first. Didn't even have time to get the gloves out to climb the ladder, I was on it! With HT still clambering to get his gloves on I started climbing.. one step, one fucking step was all I took when I looked up, saw a pigeon and then low and behold the flying rat shit on my forehead!!! I stepped down, HT didn't know what was going on, I just looked at him, pointed to my head and said a pigeon has shit on my head!! Well.... he may as well have been rolling around on the floor in hysterics! Thank god I saw the funny side.. Anyway, I cleaned the pigeon shit off...or so I thought! HT went first this time, with me following.. got all the way to the top and that fucking bird was still flapping around. I knew he was after me so I hastily made my way back down leaving HT up there and he escaped completely bird shit free! I carried on taking pics of some of the buildings and when HT came back down we carried on, laughing about pigeons. Done quite a lot of the site, there is a beautiful state of decay in this place. he buildings looks shit from the exterior but the insides have some real peely goodness. We finished up and walked back to the car.. walking along, HT kept saying he could smell shit, thinking it was dog shit we carried on and it wasn't until he leant in to kiss me he could smell the pigeon shit! I just started laughing, with me and him standing in this quiet little cul de sac with him pouring water over me to get rid of the smell it was the end to a good day Anyway on with the pics 1 - The start of the explore.... someone's excited.... 2 3 - kid in a sweet shop.... 4 5 6 - Those lamps, with neither of us taking a tripod it was the best I got.. 7 8 9 - Peely porn 10 11 - One for us... 12 13 14 15 - Think the electricity has gone.. 16 - He likes to get naked... this is the 'before' shot... 17 18 - Pigeon Shit tower.. 19
  7. hey all, i'm back again So, after setting my alarm at, what can only be described as stupid o'clock in the morning and riding for what seemed like forever in darkness, I finally found myself standing in a Burger King car park waiting for my friend. Lucky I didn't have to wait long, and we were off to our first location of the day! Entry was fine - even got in early enough to chill out for a little before sunrise. The room we chilled in happened to be that of the bleeding doors, and it's safe to say it was such a lovely site watching the sun creep through the window and illuminate the doors. I didn't take loads of pictures, but here are some of the better ones.. Sorry it's not many pictures - was too busy enjoying myself Anyhow, thanks for looking guys - and if you couldn't tell, i really liked the bleeding doors;)
  8. ...Cambridge Military Hospital... I'd been meaning to try for a revisit here for some time, so when I happened upon Spidermonkeys pics of the X-ray department that was it! Always an eventful explore this one, what with that bloody fence and the ever vigilant Ghurkas! Dragged non member Mooch along for the ride this time... ... ... Thanks for lookin...
  9. So its nice to get into another derp, been a while since I've done a nice, exciting big derp and this is one I have considered doing for a while. Visited on a miserable November morning with MrDan We started off with the maternity unit which has been disused since 1998 and it certainly shows! Although much to our suprise and for reasons unknown, the electricity is on in this very dilapidated part of the site. We spent a good few hours photographing this part of the hospital before moving on to the X-ray wards which closed in 2009. The power was recently on in here, with reports of their being juice to the X-Ray Machines! On this occasion the power was off, which can only be a good thing really as someone who doesn't know what they are doing could hurt someone. We spent a good 7-8 hours in here and progressed onto the main hospital part but found secca sealing it on the inside so decided to call it a day as the night was drawing in anyway. The Cambridge Military Hospital opened in 1879 and was to play a vital role in The First World War as being the first base to receive casualties from The Western Front. The first case of plastic surgery in the British Empire was performed here; at the CMH; Captain Gillies (later known as Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. During this time he was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. He was soon to fall in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 he came back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the CMH. When the Second World War was over, the importance of Britain's military commitments declined and civilians were admitted to the hospital. The Maternity wing closed in around 1996-98. Other sections of the hospital remained open as Frimley Park Hospital which was an NHS civilian hospital which closed sometime in 2009. #1 #2 #3 #4 The famous "Bleeding Doors" which were done this way for a film apparently. #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/with/15635196688/
  10. Had a good opportunity to visit this place after a long time of wanting to, managed to score a spot to sleep on Captain Trollface and Spider Monkey's hotel room floor so we could hit it good and early. Was stupidly thick fog that morning and would have made for some majorly haunting externals, unfortunately security are alert and mobile enough that I didn't get an op to do that. <_> Had a lot of fun in this place avoiding the sec, they were on the ball and camped out at certain vantage points but we all did a great job spotting them first and waiting them out. Cambridge Military Hospital was built in 1879 and closed in 1996 due to the cost of maintaining the old building and the discovery of a £$%&ton of asbestos in the walls. Pioneering plastic surgery techniques were performed and developed here on soldiers brought back from the Western Front during WW1. Old external of the hospital from the front showing the clock tower and main building. Didn't get into the tower unfort as was locked off from our section, might be worth checking out at gourd level next time. Smaller operating theatre lights with nature creeping in behind. One of two remaining x-ray set-ups, amazingly the power was still working and all mechanics fully functioning, had a bit of fun in here. The kitchen - pigeon only thing on menu today, this place was missing a roof so was well colonised. Ek. To the wards... The main structure was epic in scale and a single corridor linked the whole building, on the bottom floor you could see all the way to the end, on the top floor the hallways was split up but wide enough to be equipped with beds. Children's ward. Some sort of booth for the testing of audio skills or hearing aids. Some rather amazing doors. Love love love this room, they haven't come in thru the windows so not sure how they grew so fast here. Leaving so soon? Thanks for looking, I wrote a blog entry with all the high res pics on my site at: http://www.unexposed.photography/Visits/Cambridge-Military-Hospital. Linked back to Oblivion State. Thanks Miz Firestorm and SpiderMonkey for having me. Cheers guys.
  11. Visited with Goldie, this one was a whole lot of fun! getting in at 11pm and sleeping on a hard floor was 'great'.. In fact i'm not even sure i slept! At 6am as it began to get light we started to move around the place and it was so nice to see this place by dawn! Was nice and peaceful at this time in the morning Feel like we missed a few bits though, probably due to lack of sleep, we explored for a couple of hours and decided to leave. Was good not to have security on us as that was the last thing i needed that morning! All in all a great explore History (taken from Wiki): The Cambridge Military Hospital, built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot, was located at Stanhope Lines.[2] It was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and opened on 18 July 1879. In the First World War, the Cambridge Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front. The Cambridge Hospital was also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. Captain Gillies (later Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. Morestin was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. Gillies fell in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 was sent back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the Cambridge Hospital. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties. The hospital also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. Shots: Not many photos i'm afraid! but hope you enjoy these. Cheers!
  12. After visiting the hospital back in august I decided I would get some more external shots at night. I entered the site as usual and headed towards the first set of buildings and started capturing some long exposures. It was a perfect night, the stars and the moon were shining bright, perfect! I then headed onto the main road however within a minute or so we spotted the secca and his dog walking towards us. I decided not to start running and calmly made myself around to the clock tower at the front. I crouched down for a minute or so before the secca and his dog walked past about 10ft away from me, how he didn't notice me I will never know. He then stayed on the corner of the road for what seemed like ages so I decided to head to the front gate and let myself out. Of course they spotted me walking out, so after talking to them for about 5 mins and them threatening to call the police I just walked out the gate and that was that. Being my first night explore I really enjoyed it, there's something about wandering around an abandoned building at night and taking photos that is quite peaceful Anyway along with the photos!
  13. I'd been wanting to visit this place for ages, I went with two 28DL members; sentinel, and juicerail, the last of whom was actually born in there. With it being within such close proximity of military bases etc there is a lot of security, gurkhas and dog handlers patrol the grounds 24 hours a day. Nevertheless we began our explore with some ninja skills and quickly we were inside. We had a good three hours or so in the maternity building which not only has the bleeding doors but the bleeding everything pretty much, bleeding walls, cartoon characters, sinks, you name it. It's quite a creepy place and to think that babies were delivered in there seems quite bizarre looking at the state of it now, my mate juicerail turned out ok though just about! On leaving the maternity ward we were unfortunately spotted by a gurkha who quickly called for backup and waved at us a lot. He looked friendly enough so we decided to turn ourselves in rather than run which was appreciated and we were treated amicably by the gurkhas and the fuzz when they arrived. Shame we didn't make it inside the main hospital building but we were all pretty chuffed with what we did manage to see. The History: The Cambridge Military Hospital (CMH) was the fifth military hospital built in Aldershot. It was opened on 18th July in 1879 and named after Prince George, the Duke of Cambridge who was the commander-in-chief of the army at the time. It was built on a hill because the thinking at the time was that the wind would sweep away any infection and clean the air. The section which we explored was built in 1897 and named The Louise Margaret Hospital after Princess Louise Margaret, whose husband (the Duke of Connaught) was the GOC of Aldershot Command at the time. It was the largest family hospital ever to be erected by the military sevice to begin with, initially caring for the wives and children of servicemen until 1958 when it became a maternity hospital. During the First World War Cambridge Military Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front and also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties, and also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. The pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Few more snaps here http://www.flickr.com/photos/74870643@N02/sets/72157641559361794/ Thanks for looking
  14. Cambridge Military Hospital Visited with Chaos History The Cambridge Military Hospital, built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot, was located at Stanhope Lines. It was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and opened on 18 July 1879. In the First World War, the Cambridge Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front. The Cambridge Hospital was also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. Captain Gillies (later Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. Morestin was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. Gillies fell in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 was sent back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the Cambridge Hospital. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties. The hospital also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. The Explore We were getting restless moping about trying to work out what we were going to do with ourselves, one evening we decided on a last minute next day explore to this monolith of military medical history. We set off at 9am... a relatively late start considering some of the stupid times I decide to get up and go exploring, we made are way over and in....first stop... the Morgue 1. 2. 3. 4. After our 'chilling' poke about in the morgue we headed off to the main building, hearing that there was a vigilant secca presence we made best effort to get in as quickly as possible....no such luck, we spent a while frustratingly wandering around with eyes in the back of our heads to the front of the building trying to find a way in until suddenly a head pops out of a broken window "ssssssh down there...window" We moved to where we thought he was pointing....nothing. Close to the 'obvious' hut we had to make a decision and quick, after poking around a bit more we needed to adapt, improvise and overcome, with a slip and slide danger entry and a bit of an ankle breaking drop we were in, we made our way to the clock tower and then pushed on through the building. 5. On our way up to the clock tower we realised the epicness of this building, the corridors easily span 300 meters from point to point, and in the dark felt like they wen't on forever. We bumped into a couple other explorers one of which scared the living daylights out of us on a dark stairwell....cheers for that Webbly, we had a quick chat and pushed on. 6. The building 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. The mould slowly consuming the building was like nothing I've ever seen We really underestimated the size of the place and wanted to get one more area in before we left this fantastic building home for some well deserved dinner. The childrens ward 14. 15. 16. 17. The Bleeding Doors Thanks for looking
  15. I took these photos a while back but only just decided to upload them. This was my first trip to CMH and wow it was impressive. We made our way into the site and did not get disturbed for the rest of the day! Because of time we didnt manage to look around the rest of the site but anyway here are some of the photo's
  16. Visited with Webbley and Chrisr86. In Dec 2012 Maternity Bit and January 2013 for the Video! The Cambridge Military Hospital, built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot, was located at Stanhope Lines. It was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and opened on 18 July 1879. In the First World War, the Cambridge Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front. The Cambridge Hospital was also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. Captain Gillies (later Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. Morestin was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. Gillies fell in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 was sent back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the Cambridge Hospital. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties. The hospital also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. http://youtu.be/Umam2fBzZy4 Thanks!
  17. After the legendary morning that was Santastock 2012 a few of us decided to have a look at this place (minus the Christmas outfits). I had previously visited in August but only took pictures of the outside of the buildings. Absolutely stunning Victorian building with plenty to see. I spent most of the day wandering round looking for the bleeding doors, completely oblivious that they were in a separate building. Hopefully I will be able to tick that of the list one day. History: The Cambridge Military Hospital, built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot, was located at Stanhope Lines. It was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and opened on 18 July 1879. In the First World War, the Cambridge Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front. The Cambridge Hospital was also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. Captain Gillies (later Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. Morestin was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. Gillies fell in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 was sent back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the Cambridge Hospital. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties. The hospital also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.
  18. Explored with 5 non members Im sure everyone knows the history of this place by now so I wont bore you with it
  19. CAMBRIDGE MILITARY HOSPITAL, ALDERSHOT. After changing my mind about heading 'oop narth' at the last minute and a miserable fail at my first port of call, I found myself peering through the fences of this southern beauty. Failure was not an option today as this had happened here a few weeks earlier! After some fence vaulting and squeezing I was in! PRAISE THE LORD!! The first thing which struck me was the deathly silence, just the odd banging window and the wind occasionally howling through the clock tower, VERY atmospheric! The second thing that struck me was the peely paint... Mmmmmm! Lots of it too. Together with one of the longest corridors I've seen yet this place rates as one of my faves! BOSTIN!! Heres a bit of history before the pix... The Cambridge Military Hospital, built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot, was located at Stanhope Lines. It was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and opened on 18 July 1879. In the First World War, the Cambridge Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front. The Cambridge Hospital was also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. Captain Gillies (later Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. Morestin was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. Gillies fell in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 was sent back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the Cambridge Hospital. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties. The hospital also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. ON WITH THE PIX... HOPE YOU LIKE 'EM! Thanks for looking...
×