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Found 6 results

  1. With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out. A load of good that did, eh? This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks. For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known. It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's. It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me. This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos, Til the next one! "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints" 1. scouting a way in 2. The atrium, looking straight through 3. 4. 5. This tells me they were short of funds. 6. 7. The windows for the atrium 8. Lift mechanics 9. The lift motor and pulley system 10. Service history for the lift 11. A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift 12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard 13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in 14. Huge computer room 15. Keys still left as they were since closure 16. Media storage units 16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89 17. Lift room 18. Temperature gauges 19. Wiring for the lift 20. Very rusty keys 21. The motor for the lift 22. Lift schematics 23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house 24. This still works! 25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned 26. Old school floppy disk dated 91 27. Media room and units 28. Stannah lift lever 29. Inside the vast atrium 30. Another angle 31. Vintage clock and safe
  2. Following on from our escapades here is another report from The Derpy Rotten Scoundrels Euroderp Tour earlier this year. Having spent the previous day dicking about by Lake Como, swimming in the lake, the lads got their broga on, whilst Disco Kitten put everyone to shame with her epic yoga skills. fortytwo went jungleering and spent the day battling beasts in the wilderness and arrived back after a fight with a snake. Deciding we were on the move the next day we set up camp in a derelict house looking out over the lake. Chilled out with beer and did the only to do when your Euroderping and your derp has an awesome white wall, slammed Indian Jones and the Temple of Doom on the projector and settled in for the night! Our plan was to head for the Holy Grail of NPU, having visited previously I was still excited about the chance of a revisit. So we loaded up the limo and Zsa Zsa and headed off with a plan to hit the Animal Testing Facility on the way. This is another place that is proper trashed but good for a mini derp adventure. I have no idea of its full name, or where it is as I do an excellent job of sleeping as soon as Im in the car. Its a nice little walk in and there is still some interesting stuff in there to see. I've gleaned a little bit of history from some dude who went in 2016. The place belonged to a Swiss Company who were apparently big in the animal testing industry, they moved to this site and rented the building, however when the rental contract ran out they didn't renew the contract and it fell into disrepair. The land it is built on is partly poisoned, due to there being a chemical site their previously and isn't likely to be cleaned up anytime soon. A couple of years after the facility closed it was hit by a fire, causing acrid fumes to permeate the local area. Firefighters arrived and found evidence the fire had been started deliberately but were able to stop the fire fairly quickly. Although they contained the fire, the whole site had to be checked due to rumours of the facility being occupied by refugees and concerns over the local kids playing in the buildings. The facility still has the animal operating/autopsy table in place and there is lots of medical equipment lying around, lamps, autoclaves and a gloved box unit. Anyway here's a few pics (all from my phone as I lost the ones I took on my camera ) Thanks for looking
  3. I wasn't quite sure whether to stick this in military or industrial, but it's more of an industrial site that was used by the military so here it goes. This was my last explore of my American trip, on my last full day in the country and after driving around Trenton having a few fails and being totally sketched out by how much of a massive craphole the city is we plumped for an easy guaranteed in. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD for short) was constructed in 1953 directly adjacent to Trenton Mercer Airport and was used by the US Navy to test jet engines, alternate fuels, turbines and engine starters until the facility closed in 1998 due to a relocation to Tennessee. Two thirds of the site was demolished with the land handed over to a homeless charity at no cost, but as yet nothing has happened. What is left is the closest you could possibly get to a secondary Pyestock, with three test cells still in situ and the huge power plant building which at one point would have held two rows of eight turbines/exhausters to provide enough power to rival that of Pyestock's famous Air House. Sadly the turbines are no more, with just the plinths left but it's still an impressive space. Having kicked myself for missing out on a return to Pyestock with my decent gear during it's final days, I had known about and wanted to see this place for ages so it was great to see what was in essence Pyestock's little brother across the pond. The few bits of pipe left on the outside of the buildings are even that same evocative shade of light blue which made Pyestock's pipes instantly recognisable. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157659895110111 I hope you've enjoyed my selection of things from across the pond, all I have left to bring you now is a compilation of the seven or so locations I didn't get enough photos from to warrant separate threads and I'm all done! I'll be back over in the springtime all being well.
  4. I finally cracked it. Since the beginning of last year, when I first began seriously looking into and researching abandonments in the United States, I was in awe at the sheer number of derelict hospitals and asylums that littered the country. Think back to our own 'age of asylums' that lasted from roughly 2005 through to 2010, times it by maybe ten, and you're getting there. Of course the only problem is over there the country is absolutely massive so they are all spread out all over the place. I knew that I must see one, I didn't mind which, but I would bite peoples hands off to be given a chance to do an asylum in America. It just so happens myself and my companions chose one of the biggest. This asylum (which I have given a pseudonym) sits on a parcel of land 600 acres in size - that is twice the size of the entire plot of land Severalls sits on. Construction began in 1927 and it catered, at it's peak in 1959, for 9000 patients - four and a half times the 2000 that Severalls treated in it's heyday. The enormous campus is a mix of standalone buildings, sprawling quads containing 12 wards each - 4 on each floor - and dozens of other associated buildings, with the majority of buildings being 3 or 4 storeys tall. The hospital began to wind down operations during the 1970s, and now the few still active buildings offer mainly outpatient mental health services. However, these places are not plain sailing. Because you can - literally - drive around them, this also means the on-site police/security (yes), and the 'real' police have a habit of driving around too. When we were there driving through the main part of the site, it became a constant game of cat and mouse trying to avoid the suspicions of the campus police who were driving up and down the roads almost constantly. According to my mates who had been before, if you are seen by them with so much as a backpack on your back out in the open, you get escorted out immediately. So we left and re-organised ourselves before heading in to the two massive buildings at the north-eastern corner of the site, as far from the eyes of the police as possible. I'll let the photos do the talking as to what I found. No externals because of the aforementioned issues, but to be honest, they are drab, grey and uninspiring buildings. On to the second building, and things were about to get quite special. Considering going in I had no idea what to expect. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157649243716994/
  5. 1. Reha POTTlangweilig 01 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 2. Reha POTTlangweilig 02 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 3. Reha POTTlangweilig 03 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 4. Reha POTTlangweilig 04 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 5. Reha POTTlangweilig 05 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 6. Reha POTTlangweilig 06 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 7. Reha POTTlangweilig 07 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr
  6. I Saw this and i had to go! its a cool little underground hospital bigger than i thought it would be, Really enjoyed this one The medical centre was part of the Firth Brown's and was used for medicals to look after any injured employees from the factories. A little history on firth browns, that im sure you all know allready but still...... John Brown founded his company in the 1840s to manufacture steel files. Over the years the emphasis moved to the manufacture of railway track, made from steel provided by the new Bessemer process, and later to rail coach springs. Shipcladding and shipbuilding interests came into the company portfolio and finally, in the 1950s to general construction. In the late 1830s Thomas Firth was head melter at Sheffield crucible steelmakers Sanderson Brothers. He had fathered ten children, seven boys and three girls. Two of the sons, Mark and Thomas junior followed in fathers footsteps and started work at Sanderson Brothers but in 1842 left to set up their own business, their father joining them shortly afterwards. In the 1850s and '60s Thomas Firth supplied Samuel Colt with most of the iron and steel used at his firearms factories both at Hartford Connecticut and the short-lived facility in Pimlico, London. Business grew and moved into the armaments market directly, the company installing two Nasmyth Steam forge hammers in 1863 which were used to forge heavy artillery pieces. In 1871, Firth's cast the thirty five ton Woolwich Infant gun and 5 years later they produced an eighty ton gun. In 1902 Sheffield steelmakers John Brown & Company exchanged shares and came to a working agreement with neighbouring company Thomas Firth & Sons, the companies continuing under their own management until they finally merged in 1930 n 1973 Firth Brown merged with the Derby and Manchester-based wire-making firm Richard Johnson and Nephew, to form Johnson and Firth Brown Ltd (JFB).
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