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Found 18 results

  1. The well-known 18th century building was once the central administration of a nearby steelworks. Visited with @The_Raw , @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  2. This was the admin block for an adjacent steelworks. It was built in 1704, and despite being pretty battered nowadays, it still retains some of its former grandeur. The mixture of decay and natural light makes it quite photogenic. Plenty of reports from here before so this is just an update on its current state. Visited with @Maniac, @Andyand @extreme_ironing. Thanks for looking you bunch of silly little tossers
  3. The Visit Another evening explore with redhunter I couldn't believe that this place would be accessible with it being so public on the ground floor but redhunter found a way The actual building has been completely stripped ready for demolition but the roof and that strange greenhouse area are incredible! Spent a good while on the roof watching the sun go down! The History Birmingham Central Library was the main public library in Birmingham, England from 1974 until 2013. For a time the largest non-national library in Europe, it closed on 29 June 2013 and was replaced with the Library of Birmingham. The existing building was due to be demolished early in Summer 2015 after 41 years, as part of the redevelopment of Paradise Circus by Argent Group. Designed by architect, John Madin in the brutalist style, the library was part of an ambitious development project by Birmingham City Council to create a civic centre on its new Inner Ring Road system; however due to economic reasons significant parts of the masterplan were not completed and quality was reduced on materials as an economic measure. Two previous libraries occupied the adjacent site before Madin’s library opened in 1974. The previous library was opened in 1883 and was designed by John Henry Chamberlain featuring a tall clerestoried reading room, this was demolished in 1974 after the new library had opened Despite the original vision not being fully implemented the library has gained architectural praise as an icon of British Brutalism with its stark use of concrete, bold geometry, inverted ziggurat sculptural form and monumental scale. Its style was seen at the time as a symbol of social progressivism. Based on this, English Heritage applied and failed twice for the building to gain listed status. However, due to strong opposition from Birmingham City Council the building gained immunity from listing until 2016. In 2010–11 Central Library was the second most visited library in the country with 1,197,350 visitors.
  4. France Bureau Central, May 2015

    This is a slightly older set, from May 2015, whe I had just the basic skills and gear: a Nikon D3200 with 18-55 lens, and NO AB -function , the pictures don't look exactly the way I want them to, guess that i have to go back now with my new equipment. these images are all single raw , processed in ligtroom, so forgive me 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  5. Explored with FatPanda, Raz & Jord Bit of History; Birmingham Central Library was the main public library in Birmingham, England from 1974 until 2013. For a time the largest non-national library in Europe, it closed on 29 June 2013 and was replaced with the Library of Birmingham. The existing building was due to be demolished early in Summer 2015 after 41 years, as part of the redevelopment of Paradise Circus by Argent Group. Designed by architect, John Madin in the brutalist style, the library was part of an ambitious development project by Birmingham City Council to create a civic centre on its new Inner Ring Road system; however due to economic reasons significant parts of the masterplan were not completed and quality was reduced on materials as an economic measure. Two previous libraries occupied the adjacent site before Madin’s library opened in 1974. The previous library was opened in 1883 and was designed by John Henry Chamberlain featuring a tall clerestoried reading room, this was demolished in 1974 after the new library had opened. Despite the original vision not being fully implemented the library has gained architectural praise as an icon of British Brutalism with its stark use of concrete, bold geometry, inverted ziggurat sculptural form and monumental scale. Its style was seen at the time as a symbol of social progressivism. Based on this, English Heritage applied and failed twice for the building to gain listed status. However, due to strong opposition from Birmingham City Council the building gained immunity from listing until 2016. In 2010–11 Central Library was the second most visited library in the country with 1,197,350 visitors. The Explore First stop of the day, and things didnt look promising as we walked around the edges of this derpy monster and we were very surpised that we actually got a preview in the form of a public walk way through the middde of the courtyard Noting weaknesses in the defence as we went, one thing lead to another and soon we were taking a leisurely stroll through the workers equipment room. No need for torches in this one, in the areas where the walls aren't glass, the demolition company have kindly assisted with lamps to guide the way... How thoughtful of them Structually it is a great building, in terms of the little nick nacks inside its a shell, a building site. However here are a few snaps of our time here; Thanks for looking
  6. Belgium Central Station - July - 2015

    Roight so most of these angles you will have already seen courtesy of mr raw but i figured id chuck mine up all the same. What an epic place! seriously lucky to have had the opportunity to get up here and see thie amazing building, big thanks to the guys in antwerp for sorting this out- you know who you are and big thanks to raw for liaising with the antwerp guys and making this possible! there is a few of the public interior thrown in aswell just to give an idea of the place as a whole, stupidly the only external i have is on film so might have to throw it up later maybe. such good fun running around the roof walkways with tripod in one hand and a beer in the other, couldn't think of a better way to spend the evening, loved looking down through the grill of the walkway and seeing all the people in the station below wandering around completely oblivious to us little scamps upstairs! Awesome once in a lifetime shizzle explored with raw, curiousgeorge and my ol mate jane. Bit of history The Antwerp Central Station is one of the world's most impressive railway stations. Dubbed the 'Railway Cathedral', it is one of the main landmarks in Antwerp. Central Station, Antwerp Central Station The railway station was built between 1895 and 1905 and replaced a wooden train station built in 1854 by engineer Auguste Lambeau. Today the whole complex is over 400 meters (1300ft) long and has two entrances, a historic domed building at the Astrid square and a modern atrium at the Kievit square. There are three levels of tracks and a shopping center which includes a diamond gallery with more than thirty diamond shops. The domed building The monumental main building was designed by the Bruges architect L. Delacenserie. It has a huge dome and eight smaller towers of which six were demolished during the 1950s. Fortunately, these were reconstructed in 2009 Clock and Antwerp Coat of Arms, Central Station, Antwerp Station interior together with several ornaments including large lion statues. The rich interior is lavishly decorated with more than twenty different kinds of marble and stone. The main hall and the railway cafeteria can match the interiors of many palaces. Not a single square meter either inside or outside the building is not decorated. The train shed Antwerp Central Station Interior The platforms are covered by a huge iron and glass vaulted ceiling, which was restored in the 1990s. Besides the platform, the vault also covers many of the small diamond and gold shops, which are part of the diamond district next to the Central Station. The huge glass vault was designed by the architect J. Van Asperen. It is 185 meters long and 44 meters at its highest point. The original platform and tracks themselves are elevated, the two lower levels were added later to accommodate the high speed train connection to Amsterdam. few internals to start and the awesomeness of the roof! spot the raw?! thanks for looking kids!
  7. Belgium Central Ohm... April '15

    The last location on our last Belgian excursion and what a belter!! Not actually abandoned so maybe class this one as infiltration... Vintage turbons, switches n dials... YES PLEASE!!! ...CENTRAL OHM... ... As always, thanks for lookin' in
  8. My last thread today I promise!! Out of all the abandonments in Buffalo the most famous one is by a long way the Central Terminal. It is instantly recognisable as a huge monolithic building and has been used in many films, TV shows etc etc. The main high rise part is very well locked up because of this, but the rest of the parts including the platforms and passenger walkways are open to the elements. And oh boy were the elements having fun this day. The weather was pretty grim when we were in Sacred Heart Church but by the time we had had lunch and made it to the Terminal it was truly horrific, so much so we actually abandoned the explore during a torrential hailstorm which flooded all the dirt tracks through and around the site. That and spying a mysterious small car parked near to where there is usually a police cruiser sat, it wasn't security or police probably just some foolish explorers but it spooked us sifficiently to call it a day and walk our sodden way back to the car and the warm. Because of the weather I didn't get many photos. More here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157649154039682/
  9. Nice to get away from the dull and wet UK for a couple of days, and visit some of the islands derelict offerings in the sunshine. Central Térmica coal fired power station was built in 1958 according to a design by the Spanish architect Ramón Vázquez Molezún, the plant was closed in 1991/92 after a new modern power station was opened in 1986 only 10km away. Enjoyed this very much hence the image heavy report..... .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
  10. 1. Central Thermique01 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 2. Central Thermique02 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 3. Central Thermique03 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 4. Central Thermique04 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 5. Central Thermique05 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 6. Central Thermique06 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr
  11. Stumbled across this place by accident at the weekend I only hade my trusty phone camera with me so here is the results. Thanks for looking...
  12. Sometimes working a Sunday has its advantages such as no demolition crew right next to your entry point It took longer to get in than it did to explore the place but the control room made for a welcome site to work for a little while
  13. Info taken from Urban Degeneration... (Thanks) Splored with S8 & Zero81. In 1918 Lever Brothers built a power station on the banks of the Mersey on what was to become Commercial Road. The station was called Central Power Station and had three coal fired boilers and a 5 Megawatt generating set manufactured by Siemen’s Brothers. The boilers had ‘chain grates’, these were like slow moving conveyor belts which passed through the furnaces, coal was loaded on one end from a hopper, it moved into the furnace and as the coal burned, the ash was collected in hoppers under the boilers. Expansion continued, in 1929 electricity was installed in the houses of Port Sunlight Village and, in 1931, Bromborough Dock was opened. To meet the increased demand, Central Power Station was expanded, with the addition of three more coal fired boilers and a 6.25 Megawatt generating set. The station could now produce a total of 11.5 Megawatts of electrical power at 3.3kv. By the 1950s Central Power Station was producing power for the various Lever’s factories around Port Sunlight and Bromborough, both of the Villages and for other companies operating in the Bromborough Pool area. It had a connection to the main MANWEB electricity supply so that in periods of high demand it imported power from MANWEB, and at times of low demand it exported power to MANWEB. Many of the works supplied with electricity also used steam and there were more than 10 low pressure steam generating plants operating in the area. A new type of generating set was now available, this was known as a ‘Back Pressure Generator’, it took steam at high pressure, used it to turn the turbine then output the steam for re-use at a lower pressure. A pilot scheme was installed in the hardening plant of the old margarine works, opposite Central Power Station, this consisted of a small 1.3 Megawatt back pressure generating set manufactured by British Thomson Houston. This took steam at 230 p.s.i. from the power station boilers and output steam at 50 p.s.i. The pilot scheme was a success, and it was decided to build a new power station on what is now Thermal Road. thanks...
  14. Visited with TCake lightning visit, lots of negotiating with the the local people to find and the gain an access route to this one Carls Shaft Major investments were made ​​in 1949-1954 to meet an increasing demand for iron ore . Despite this, the mine closed in 1967, partly as a result of intensifying international competition and a decline in Western European economy around 1966-1967. [4] The annual output of the mine closure was about 250 000 tonnes. Pics ....and from the roof Thanks
  15. Here follows a tale of derring-do unlike any other in my history... The Central Hydraulic Tower in Birkenhead was a Hydraulic Accumulator station situated in the docks, it ceased operating many moons ago and the plan is eventually to turn it into a hotel. The inside was the biggest death trap I had ever visited until I saw Grands Moulins de Paris mill. Most of the staircases were rotten with planks of wood the only way across. The ladders up to the top were unstable to say the least, most of them secured with blue twine. And the ladder up to the roof was barely a ladder, 3 missing steps and a half broken side, and it didn't even line up with the roof hatch. And we did this on a night it was blowing a gale. A major rush but looking back, so bloody dangerous. Excuse the shoddy exterior and interior photos, it's fair to say I wasn't entirely focused on getting composed shots inside... A year or so ago a group of kids got stranded at the top with the fire service having to rescue them, after this the interior was pretty much stripped out of everything. A few more here http://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157627740187149/
  16. Evening all, Slowly getting through the European location sets and got another to share. This is known as Bureau Central and was our first stop when we left Luxembourg. The builders are in the grounds and there is a real hive of activity going on. We found a way in and spent a few hours here. There isn't much in the way of items left behind but just a real dark, atmospheric and beautiful architectural wonder of a building with a good strong familiar smell of decay. Minimal history on this one. Central Office was built in 1892 and was expanded in 1926 through the development of the company. This huge building was abandoned in 1986 following a merger between two leading companies in the steel industry in France. Some of the photos I've processed are below. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 Cheers for looking in.
  17. Evening all, Giving myself a break from posting up residential places, I thought I'd post up an industrial location which was right on the border between Luxembourg and France and formed part of our first full day in Luxembourg before we left for France. We parked up and made our way over the road and up to the main site. From the access through to the first few levels, the place looked quite derelict with a lot of graffiti, theft and destruction. We decided to climb to the very top and make our way down. As we made our way down, the better parts were revealed to us and some of these areas can be seen below. Some history Terres Rouge/Centrale Thermique is an abandoned power station in the industrial heart of Luxembourg. Already in the 1870s, four furnaces were built in the region. Since then, many blast furnaces have been added, which led to the blossoming of the Luxembourg steel industry and turned it into one of the largest in Europe. Originally, only the gas which was produced by the creation of cokes was used to generate electricity – next to, evidently older techniques which existed already. Later on, however, a new process was discovered to convert the furnace gas, which was released by the melting of the steel, into electricity. In 1951, the Centrale Thermique was built, which allowed to apply this newly developed technique and thus provide electricity for the surrounding industry. When the last furnace in the region was shut down in 1997, the power station lost its purpose and was left abandoned. I will let the photos speak for themselves, better than I could with words. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 Thanks for looking in.
  18. Explored with Skeleton Key, Klempner69, Tommo, UrbanX and Waddy Ongar station was opened by the Eastern Counties Railway on 24 April 1865, serving principally as a goods station taking agricultural produce from the nearby farms into central London. On 29 September 1949, London Underground services took over the operation of the station from British Railways when services were extended from Loughton. The entire Epping to Ongar branch was a single track line with one passing place at North Weald station. The line was under threat of closure for many years, and it was finally closed on 30 September 1994 The station and the line are now in the ownership of a private company, the Epping Ongar Railway Ltd who, at time of purchase, publicly stated their intention to run commuter services again, but the claimed lack of platform availability at London Underground's Epping station at the west end of the line has to date proven an insuperable obstacle to this. On with the piccies......... Thanks for looking
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