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Found 13 results

  1. History The building this report is based on is the old art deco Filter House. The building housed all of the equipment and tanks that were needed to complete the chemical filtration process. It also contained a laboratory which was used to handle chemicals and conduct tests, to ensure the water was fit for human consumption before being sent to the nearby reservoir. The site on which the old chemical filter building at Sandford Mill sits began life as a corn mill. The timber mill was constructed sometime in the early 19th century, directly over a stream that would run underneath the centre of the building. The stream drove a large water wheel, which provided power to the corn mill. By the end of the century, a steam engine was installed to generate additional power. It is noted that coal used to run the engine was supplied from Newcastle-under-Lyme, which was transported along canals via horse drawn barges. In 1923 Chelmsford Corporation purchased the site for the construction of a new Borough Waterworks. Construction of the new facility began in 1926, around the time milling in the area ceased. The old corn mill was subsequently demolished, save for two cottages which were built in 1905. They are the only surviving remnants of the original mill. The waterworks started operating in March 1929, despite the fact that it was not fully completed until July 1930. The preliminary site consisted of a large red brick building which became known as the ‘Engine House’. Water from the River Chelmer, and from a 650ft deep borehole was both treated and pumped inside this building using electrically-driven pumps. These were powered by diesel driven alternators during the day and the mains electricity supply by night. The capacity of the waterworks was improved in 1956, following the construction of a new building that was known as the ‘Filter House’. The entire water treatment process was transferred over to the new building, and additional pumps were installed in the Engine House. Three further pump houses were also erected across the site, to move the water around the site through the various stages of the treatment process. The largest pump house, positioned over by the weir, became known as the River Pump House. After being treated the water was transported via the Engine House over to Galleywood Reservoir, approximately four miles away, for use in Chelmsford. Although local rumour has it that the building was designed and constructed by the same Scottish architects, Dunn and Watson, who are responsible for the construction of the Marconi factory in Chelmsford, this is in fact not true. Dunn and Watson’s practice closed in 1912, forty-four years before the chemical building was completed. While the Filter House follows a very similar late art deco design, whoever constructed it remains unknown. During the mid-70s, the water industry was nationalised and the site was acquired by the Essex Water Company. To avoid the operating two duplicated sites in close proximity of one another, the water company decided to transfer all operations to a site further down the River Chelmer, at Langford. By 1984, all water pumping at the Sandford Mill site ceased and the facility was made completely redundant. Most of the equipment was removed that same year, and the land was returned to the Borough Council. Our Version of Events At the end of areasonably successfulday of exploring over in Colchester, where we’d ended up finding ourselves in a semi-abandoned hospital, we decided to meet up with Xploring and DRZ_Explorer. For the rest of the evening we fucked around trying to get into a cinema, then in the clock tower of the Britvic site and finally, rather randomly, a cemetery. After that, we arranged to meet up the next night because there was some sort of chemical filter building nearby that sounded like it was a good wander. From what we were being told, the place sounded like it was something a bit different and unique. The following evening came, and we all met up down a small country lane by the side of a canal. Getting onto the site wasn’t particularly difficult; although, finding a way inside the building itself presented its own set of challenges. However, it wasn’t long before we were all inside the building, gathered at the bottom of the main staircase that leads into the main tank room. It was at this point we realised visiting during the night perhaps wasn’t the greatest idea ever conceived. Once we climbed the stairs and entered the large hall housing the chemical tanks it suddenly dawned on us that the room is has windows on every side, and overlooking the building are the former mill cottages and the museum – where there were lights switched on. We did our best to take photos throughout the building, but not being able to light-paint too well meant that most of the shots came out a bit shit. In the end, we gave up and decided we’d pop back the following day, during daylight hours. We returned the next day, and were disappointed to find a white van parked outside. So, for the next hour or so we had to play the waiting game and a couple of rounds of dominos, until the van and its occupants finally fucked off. Thankfully, they did eventually leave, so we made our way back to the entrance we’d found the previous night. Fortunately, it was still open. Once inside, visibility was incredible. Plenty of natural light was pouring through the windows, making our job of snapping up some photos much easier. What is more, now we could properly take in our surroundings. The lads from the previous night had been right, the place looked amazing. With all of the tiles around, it was kind of like standing in an ancient swimming baths, crossed with an old-school batman-styled chemical factory – the type where bad-guys and scientists have a high risk of falling into a vat of unspecified chemical waste. Much to our disappointment, neither batman nor the joker turned up. The only weird thing we stumbled across were a few skeletons of rabbits and squirrels. As others have said before, it looked like a small-scale massacre had taken place. Our theory, then, is that the animals had somehow managed to get inside the building, because, as with all explores, it has been broken into a few times. This means at some point the doors and windows may have been open to the little critters. Since all the skeletons look fairly intact, it looked more like the animals died due to poisoning – they are inside a former chemical filtering building after all, where there is an abundance of chemical residue. How they all managed to end up in the same room, however, is a harder phenomenon to explain. Our guess is that Poison Ivy may have inhabited the building at some point, and she moved all the corpses into that room where she was able to have a bit of a barbeque. We found her cans of special brew; evidence that she definitely cooked something up in that room. Anyway, we’re certain that this theory surpasses all others in terms of its validity and reliability. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa, Stewie and Xploring. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  2. This was the second stop of out Sunday trip. I have to say I do love a good bit of industrial filth. History - Originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The site employed around 115 people and was part of the Uniqema acquisition in 2006. In 2008, the business had a turnover of £45.3m and made a £2.1m operating profit. This was flattered by favourable glycerine pricing and the site made a loss in the final quarter of 2008 which has worsened into 2009, this poor performance eventually lead to the closure of the site.
  3. The Explore After visiting Lostock power station this was actually a really relaxed explore with lots of different types of building to look around, theres warehouses, offices, workshops and a huge industrial area at the back. The History Originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The site employed around 115 people and was part of the Uniqema acquisition in 2006. In 2008, the business had a turnover of £45.3m and made a £2.1m operating profit. This was flattered by favourable glycerine pricing and the site made a loss in the final quarter of 2008 which has worsened into 2009, this poor performance eventually lead to the closure of the site.
  4. A bit of History: The plant started operating in 1855 and employed over 2000 workers at the hight of its trade. It has had other names over the years but Croda being the most commonly known in recent times. The plant unfortunately closed in 2009, which did cause over 100 staff to loose their jobs, but they very kindly spent £40 million on turning this danger hazard into a playground for us adventurers! The Explore: This one was explored with Raz and Fat Panda.. As we arrived, true to their nature, we had council workers opposite our entrance just wasting air as they sat there motionless in their van. We took a wander around the site and managed to find our way in after having a lovely chat with one of the local scum bags who just could not understand why we weren't going in to steal anything... Anyway after creeping around a little we came to the conclusion there was no secca onsite. Now with freedom to explore we wandered freely. Unfortunately I could not make it up the towers as my jelly legs would not allow me to but all in all it was a fun explore. This is the first report I have uploaded so any pointers would be great Thanks for looking this far
  5. THE HISTORY Croda was originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The factory opened in 1855 and the company went from having 84 staff in 1840 to a remarkable 2300. Borrowed from Lavino hope you dont mind m8ty. The explore Visited here with Acid- Reflux. Really liked the look of this wanted to climb those towers lol. Anyway was one hell of a fun explore. Has we got there acid suddenly stopped and said someone is riding a bike round the outside of building looking in like secca etc. Very clever has a lot quieter than a quad. Anyways once he had done one in we went but that wasn't the end of close calls and surprises lol. After a nice walk round we split up temporally taking some shots. When from out of no where this dude walked right past a door where i was stood big bald dude looked like someone you wouldn't wanna meet lol. He didn't see me so i slowly made my way back to acid told him and waited a little. Anyway decided to make our way to another building the clock tower was our next port of call. Just has we went round the corner this lad came the other way How the fook he didn't see us i have no idea. Anyway me and acid then hid like a couple of prats in a fairly cramp shower after stepping across some minions heads that made more fooking noise than pigeons lol. After 15 mins or so acid then decided to say WTF are we doing lol. And out we went straight into clock tower building. Now this was pretty cool. While we where in there one floor above us there was a shit ton of noise. Talking banging etc. When we got to stairs we stood for a bit then decided fook it up we went. Now no ghost shit but FFS it was empty no fooker there 15 mins of noise and now empty no way down past us NOTHING. So if that was you doing one hell of a magic trick fair play. We couldn't get to the clock but from what Ive heard its modern now so not really much to see. Anyway did the rest towers etc. And then right near the end i heard acid say hello and in walked this big bald dude Shit busted. So you would think but oh no all this time playing hide and seek and he was there doing something metal who knows cause he says " Are you meant to be in here " In which Acid replies in his charming manner " No Are You" The guy then says " No " Acid then says " Good " LMFAO. All this fooking time hide and fooking seek and they where not even secca DUH. Anyways was a bloody fun explore now on with thee pics. PICS WooHoo Kitchens lol love me a kitchen. Snakes and ladders or that snake game from nokia days lol Very very funny considering the company lol. Photo opp lol My made phot opp lol I am a Dalek From the towers Waiting on tour bus home lol Thanks for looking. Sorry on pic heavy but with such a larger place and several buildings hard to cut down pics. Hope you like it.
  6. visited the croda chemical plant myself @woopashoopaa @telf @the Kwan and thanks to Kwan for giving us the tour of this huge site. Covered the whole site apart from the one with the clock tower and it did look rather good. We had heard that security patrolled the site on a motorbike we did here one but never saw one. But we did see the metal fairies who were so busy they ran past us in one room and didn't even see us lol. So here's some history and some of my photos... THE HISTORY Croda was originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The factory opened in 1855 and the company went from having 84 staff in 1840 to a remarkable 2300. In 1919 the company was taken over by Lever Brothers who used the site for soap production. There is no longer any evidence of either of these companies having used the site. In 1936 the Lever Brothers pulled out of candle production but continued to use the site until 1997 when ICI bought it off Unilever (Unichema on-site), formerly Lever Brothers/Margarine Union. Since then it has been known as Croda International and continued production of fatty acids and glycerol until late 2009 when the site ceased production. The site is still very much live, but is in the process of being decommissioned and demolished, which has resulted in the loss of 115 jobs mainly held by people living in Bromborough Pool village. [
  7. Poland The Laboratory - 2015

    ‘But it was just a part of the story…’ This story starts in the point where the last one (http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9412-The-Library-and-Forbidden-Archive-July-2015) ended … more or less. It is again the same winter Sunday or Saturday … (don’t remember now maybe it was the 7th or 8th of February 2015 - the photos come from much wider range of time), the day when we reached that location for the first time. It is the day in which we reached the top floor of the building and we discovered the library, reading room, project/drawing rooms and archive. But now … there was something more. We are standing on a dark corridor (me and my two friends). Standing in front of a door. It seemed that this door led to another part of the building. From satellite pictures we could guess that we were just in ½ of the length of the building. There had to be another part of the corridor behind the door and some other unexplored room. After what we saw already we had to get in. The door was two sided, wooden, quite massive. On the left side there used to be a window with an windowsill. Now the window was sealed with a massive plank attached by nine or ten inch nails. There was no door handle on the door (someone just removed the old one). It was quite obvious that someone wanted to sell-off that part with a lot of effort. We could also notice that the lock in the door was closed from inside and the keyhole (of quite modern lock was damaged). At some point we wanted to give up, At that point it took us almost an hour to find a way to enter. The door was wooden but because of all the moisture the wood on the outside was soft. After some time we could see the deadbolt. Luckly the lock was old, the deadbolt was not locked in a fixed position and we could move it back. Than we used that door handle I found, located its bolt in the hole. This allowed us to move the latch bolt back. Now we needed just a bit of leaver to move the door. Because of all the moisture it was just a bit of stuck. Maybe after more than an hour we could get inside. It was something we couldn’t except from outside. Something we were not anticipating to see in such building. There was a scent. Chemical, unpleasant scent. We were entering a long abandoned laboratory. What we discovered was a set of different rooms connected with one corridor. On the left there was a small social room. Items scattered around here and there. It all looked as if no one moved it from long time. Everything just as if left in a hurry. Back to the main hall. A door on the right. A small board with a sign ‘Angle measurement’ I remember Iv entered a quite big room. First what I noticed just made my feet soft. All this equipment, wasted, rusting, forgotten. How much of state money had to be here in this building … A meeting room by which we I could enter another room (here visible on the left). Inside different measuring tools. Everything just as left a decade ago. Ducktape, stamples, rubber stamp, pens, typing machines, phones …. There was also a lot of different documents, furniture, wet, now a bit rotting. All the tools covered with rust. But of course what was most important (for us) everything was not moved here since the workers abandoned this place. There was no dust holes, no footprints. No signs of activity of any visitors. Just the sign of time. And as in the library/archive/reading room because it was the last floor we could see that there was water dripping through the ceiling. Someone tried to place some kind of containers for water but without maintenance … But until then we didn’t found the source of that chemical scent. We had to go a bit deep in to the unknown. Next door on our right. The scent became almost unbearable. Now we started to get to the source. First a chemical storage room. Water dripping through the ceiling, chemical moist in the air. Some of the older containers broken with their insiders on the floor. As a graduate of biotech I decided that there is not much health risk and that we can proceed. We found a fool scale chemical laboratory Chemical glasses still on the benches, full with different content. Acid that was mixing with the air made its job allowing everything to corrode even faster. What was mostly stunning is that if any one of use moved an object we could already see it. A white patch, free of dust. It had to be a decade since no one visited this place. Everything as if the time had stopped. Objects, equipment waiting to be sued again … What made me almost cry are those high sensitive scales that had to be really expensive at some time. We were able to find a lot of things there. Old documents, photos of workers, undeveloped films. Some of those things could be saved. And again there were some many details. So many things that just standing there made my head hurt. I remember that when I came that day back to home I was totally exhausted. The amount of frames, details that this location had to offer was mind blowing. At that point we decided not to publish any photos. We wanted to gather as much material from this place as possible. We wanted to record it, film it in the state we discovered it that day. It was a long and hard work … And now … This is a taste a things to come https://vimeo.com/124396935 When it’s done .. you will know As the last time more photos can be seen in following albums: https://www.flickr.com/photos/126529380@N08/sets/72157651170444730 https://www.flickr.com/photos/126529380@N08/sets/72157649023177383
  8. Short Video from last month, lots to see here
  9. Gonna keep this short as im using the on screen keyboard but posted a report here a while back and we finally got to go in the light. visited with Raz Enjoy
  10. This Mill was originally one of Essex’s watermills. It closed in 1926, when the town waterworks was built on the site. The waterworks became redundant in 1984 when the town was supplied from another pumping station further down the River. It has been sat alone and empty since 1984. Beautiful art deco style building virtually untouched since closing. Visited with a non member, he had been before and took me round to see it. It was a nice easy explore. Lots to see but mainly that control panel at the top of the stairs which looks as if its waiting for you as you walk round the corner. The tiled floors and walls are basically untouched bar a few that have lost their glueyness. There are a few large tanks, 6 I think. Some laboratory rooms and some weird happenings down stairs in the toilet. There were animals basically ripped apart, human clothes in a little cubby hole so can only think there must have been some sort of weirdo in there at some point. More newspaper, the last 3 explores I have done there has ben dated newspaper, in this whole place there was just 1 page with the date. And lots of dial porn Hope you enjoy, I liked this place Sorry... It was calling!
  11. Hello OS. I've done a report on this place already, I know.. But there's a few photos I didn't add and i've had a few more visits since then (I can't keep away). Demolition here is well underway and it won't be long until all of the disused areas are just waste, and I'm pretty sad to see this go really, I can't even count how many times I've been, just to go and see if i can find anything new and sadly, most of the best parts are now gone. Pretty much every visit with AndyK/Behind Closed Doors. A quality location altogether, plenty to see History: The origins of the company lie with two brothers, Henri and Camille Dreyfus. In 1912 they set up "Cellonit Gesellschaft Dreyfus and Co" in Basel, Switzerland. In 1916 the brothers were invited to live in Britain by the British Government, to produce their recently developed cellulose acetate dope for the war effort; the canvas skins of aircraft of the time were sealed and made taut with nitrocellulose dope, which was easily ignited by bullets. They developed the necessary plant and "British Cellulose and Chemical Manufacturing Co" was registered on March 18, 1916. The British Government patented the process developed by Henri Dreyfus, which lowered the costs of acetic anhydride production, an important reagent in the production of cellulose acetate. At the end of World War I, the British Government cancelled all contracts and the company changed to produce acetate fibres. In 1923 the company name was changed to British Celanese Ltd, a contraction of cellulose and ease. Softer and stronger, as well as being cheaper to produce than other fabrics used at the time such as satin or taffeta, Celanese was used in the production of garments. British Celanese was the first factory in Britain to produce propylene and from it isopropyl alcohol and acetone in 1942. Clarifoil production developed out of cellulose acetate yarn technology. Clarifoil full-scale production commenced from 1947. Henri Dreyfus died in 1944. Camille Dreyfus died in 1956. In 1957, British Celanese was taken over by Courtaulds. The site is now operated by Celanese. The plant finally closed after the last shift on Wednesday 14th November 2012. Pics: Couple from the night visit: Bye! Cheers for looking
  12. UK Acid Land! - 2014

    Hello again! Finally covered most of this site after about three six hour visits, it's MASSIVE! I loved this place, plenty to see and there's always the chance of some action Overall a great explore! Demolition is soon to be in full swing sadly, I'll miss the place.Visited earlier in the year with Goldie, and a bit more recently revisited with AndyK! and PopPunkJamie. Head up, pic heavy Pics: Cheers for looking, SM
  13. Ok trip out with Critical Mass,Hanel Dante & Host to a partly demoed chemical plant After a while trudging through mud and reeds we had a small climb to make then on site ,a pretty relaxed explore but this site has its obstacles.....on with the pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Short but sweet ,its been along day cheers for looking Oldskool
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