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Found 13 results

  1. I visited the chocolate factory already more than four years ago. Inside it was partly very dark - much darker than it looks in the photos. The plaster had fallen from the ceiling; a gray damp mud lay on the floor and stuck stubbornly to the shoes. After the owner died, the factory was closed over 20 years ago. The widow of the manufacturer still lives in a dilapidated house next to the factory. In the past years, the condition has worsened a lot. Meanwhile, the roof of the former factory has almost completely collapsed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  2. The old factory building (built 1906 – 1908) has a rich history. The original chocolate factory functioned as a temporary base for the American, German and Belgian army during the two World Wars. After World War II the factory was assigned a new goal, from then on it was used for the production of tin. Nowadays it's being restored in appartments. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8
  3. Thought it was worth going back here to get some new pictures. It was really worth it as some more decay has set in and my photography skills I feel have improved somewhat I was oop north hanging out with Jamie_P for a bit and we decided it'd be a good idea to go and get some explores done, so we contacted Mr de Kay and sorted a plan We did three locations in all and had an awesome time and a very successful day. Photos: Cheers, SM
  4. Easter bunnies are currently in season. Therefore below some pictures from a factory that produced amongst others easter bunnies made of chocolate. A lot of the old equipment is still in there, but it is pitchblack inside, therefore only a few shots... #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 For a few more pictures, check my website: http://www.industriesafari.de/Viewer/Osterhasenwerk14/index.html
  5. Terry's Chocolate

    threw a video together of a good day out at Terry's over the weekend was treated to a sweet sunset too!
  6. Visited with Hamtagger and Session9 The main reason I wanted to go here was for the stairs (And I took about 70 pictures of them all together) We left Lincolnshire early as always, driving down the motorway half asleep en route to York to pick Session9 up for our "First splore of the day" When we arrived at Terry's we headed straight for the Admin building but it looked like the only way in would be a tough one, and we had walked past 5 cameras without noticing (They're pretty small) Luckily we were there earlier than the security. We then decided to do the main "Crappy derp of a building" to begin with and head back for the Admin after. The main factory actually wasn't that bad, it was a bit bare but still better than some of the others I've been to. After an eventful walk around finding a potential IED, a turd on the roof and slipping on ice every 10 seconds we headed for the Clock tower, but it was sealed tighter than Fort Knox. (You win some, you lose some) So we walked back to the Admin building and made our way in. Session9 is approximately 8 feet tall so it was quite interesting squeezing through tiny gaps History Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. Its history stretched back to 1767, but in 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. The company's headquarters, later renamed The Chocolate Works factory, was closed by Kraft in 2005, and products using the Terry's brand name are now produced in other Kraft facilities in Poland, Sweden, Belgium, and Slovakia. The Terry's name eventually became part of Mondelēz International. Pictures 1 Terry's Clock Tower and Factory 2 Circular Window in the main factory 3 What's a factory without a puddle reflection? 4 Lift 5 A selfie of a selfie 6 Ladies loo 7 The beginning of the stairs 8 Another angle 9 HD-ARRGHH 10 I wanted to go for a different angle than the others I'd seen, so I got Hamtagger to pose on a post with me. 11 I may have obsessed over these a bit 12 Framing the window with a window 13 Through the looking glass 14 Odd angles 15 Dome from above with Lens flare 16 Lights in a darkened room Thankyou for taking time to read my report. 97 more to come this year!
  7. Terry's Chocolate Factory The Explore Alarm clock springs into life at 3:30am, it feels like someone has thrown sand in my eyes and I wonder for a split second why i'm awake this early. Then I remember.. explore day I drove up to meet Matt Inked, then onwards to York to rendezvous with Session9. A quick chin-wag then onto the first target of the day before the sun came up. We had a quick look at the factory building and possible access to it was found, but decided to have a look at the tower and admin building first and quickly realised the tower was sadly shut tight and the admin building wasn't looking too good either at that point We went back and spent an hour or two in the factory, then decided to check out the admin building one more time and thankfully this time found our way inside.... The History Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. Its history stretched back to 1767, but in 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. The company's headquarters, later renamed The Chocolate Works factory, was closed by Kraft in 2005, and products using the Terry's brand name are now produced in other Kraft facilities in Poland, Sweden, Belgium, and Slovakia. The Terry's name eventually became part of Mondelēz International. The Pictures 1. Large factory building to the left, clock tower in the middle, and admin building to the right. 2. The sun slowly appearing on a frosty morning 3. 4. 5. 6. 7,8,9. Factory puddle reflections (7 and 9 are inverted ) 10. Moving on to the admin building.. 11. That Staircase... 12. The Skylight... 13. 14. Main admin "shop floor" 15. 16. Admin Roof 17. Above the dome 18. Roof "attic" enclosed on the roof of admin 19. It was a shame that the tower was sealed shut as tight as the preverbal nuns chuff, but believe it we did try. Maybe next time. As always, thanks for looking and all feedback much appreciated
  8. History Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York with a history dating back to 1767. This factory opened in 1926 and became known as Terry's Confectionery Works. It was buil in an Art Deco style and included a distinct clock tower. Here new products including the Chocolate Apple (1926), Terry's Chocolate Orange (1931), and Terry's All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. With the onset of the Second World War, confectionery production was immediately halted. The factory was taken over by F Hill's and Son's of Manchester as a shadow factory, to manufacture and repair aircraft propeller blades. With the factory handed back to the company post-war, production was difficult due to rationing and limited imports of raw cocoa. As a result, in 1954 production of the chocolate apple was phased out in favour of increased production of the chocolate orange. In 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. From 2000, the company brand was changed from Terry's of York to simply Terry's, reducing the company's links to the city. Production was also scaled back, with just UK products and Terry's Chocolate Orange, Terry's All Gold and Twilight made for the international market. In 2004, Kraft Foods decided to absorb Terry's, switch production of remaining products All Gold and Chocolate Orange to their own factories in Belgium, Sweden, Poland and Slovakia, and close the plant. The factory closed on 30 September 2005, with the loss of 317 jobs. The factory was bought by developers Grantside, renamed The Chocolate Works, and in February 2010 planning permission was given for a £165 million redevelopment of the site as a mixed-use of residential, commercial and leisure. Redevelopment started in 2011, with removal of asbestos, followed by demolition of non-scheduled buildings in early 2012. Our Visit I jumped on a last minute coach from London with extreme_ironing on hearing news that construction work at Terry's has upped the pace recently and now has 24 hour security in place. We were a bit apprehensive about making such a long trip with the possibility of failure but both determined to see this place before it's demise. Thankfully our trip was well worth the effort as we managed to access the admin building, the factory and the old clock tower. Security always seemed to be one step behind us as we watched them nosing around each building after we'd moved onto the next one. It really is an amazing site, the admin building full of Art Deco features was a joy to explore, a real life Willy Wonka factory if you like. After 6 hours on site we headed off into the night for a well earnt curry and beers before hitting another of York's gems. The Pics Looking towards the main factory from the roof of the admin building, we had to stay low at this point as security was wandering about below us.... The ground floor of the admin building, everything decorated in Art Deco style.... Art deco detail The Safe Door Logo on the inside of the safe The grand entrance hall The stairs, lost count of how many pics I took in here.... Stained glass dome window above the staircase Office The manager's office overlooking downstairs Detail On top of the clock toweer Construction site next door with York Minster in the distance Looking down over the security hut with the factory to the right and admin building on the left Behind one of the clock faces Factory doors Not much to see inside the factory except long empty rooms like this The walls and windows are still pretty impressive for a factory though Watching security's movements over in the admin building The racecourse next door The clock tower from the top of the factory Night starting to close in Extreme Ironing chilling in the window frame waiting for security to finish his rounds below Thanks for looking
  9. Hey there! Visited this one with Miz Firestorm, Miss Lightyear and Goldie on a bit of a Yorkshire tour. Could have easily spent a few more hours here just wandering around, loved it. Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. Its history stretched back to 1767, but in 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. The company's headquarters, later renamed The Chocolate Works factory, was closed by Kraft in 2005, and products using the Terry's brand name are now produced in other Kraft facilities in Poland, Sweden, Belgium, and Slovakia. The Terry's name eventually became part of Mondelēz International. In 1767 as Robert Berry opened a shop close to Bootham Bar, York, selling cough lozenges, lemon and orange candied peel and other sweets. Joined by William Bayldon, the partners renamed the business Bayldon and Berry confectionery. Born in Pocklington, Joseph Terry came to York to serve as an apprentice apothecary in Stonegate. On gaining his certificates, he set up as a chemist in Walmgate. But after marrying Harriet Atkinson in 1823, he met her elderly uncle Robert Berry. After William Bayldon left the business, Terry agreed to become a partner in the confectionery business, and after closing his chemists shop joined the confectionery business in St Helen's Square, York. In 1825 after the death of Robert Berry, Terry agreed a new partnership with Robert's son George, renaming the business Terry & Berry. In 1828, George left the business and it was renamed Terry's of York. Using his skills as a chemist, Joseph developed new lines of chocolate, confectionery, sugared sweets, candied peel, marmalade and medicated lozenges. He began using the developing railway network of the North Eastern Railway, to distribute his products over the North of England and as far away as London. In 1923, Frank and Noel Terry joined the family business. They revamped the company, launching new products and bought a site off of Bishopthorpe Road, York on which to develop a new factory known as Terry's Confectionery Works. Built in an Art Deco style, the factory included a distinct clock tower. Opened in 1926, new products including the Chocolate Apple, Terry's Chocolate Orange, and Terry's All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. In 2004, Kraft Foods decided to absorb Terry's, switch production of remaining products All Gold and Chocolate Orange to their own factories in Belgium, Sweden, Poland and Slovakia, and close the plant. The factory closed on 30 September 2005, with the loss of 317 jobs. After all that history.. Photos! Cheers for looking
  10. UK Willy Wonkas Chocolate Factory

    Couldnt make my mind up which section to put this in so I settled on here, its a factory but only really shot for the stairs. Fun day out with fellow explorers Project Mayhem, AndyK and Matt Kriegaffenine Hampshire Not much to say, good fun morning no complications, like it should be I make no apologies for the number of stair shots cheers The Baron
  11. The Chocolate Factory Industrial Elegance History It may seem like a set from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, but this impressive Chocolate Works in York is really real! Built 1924 to 1930 after Frank and Noel Terry joined the family business, the factory produced chocolate and all sorts of confectionery until its closure in 2005. The buildings are fronted with an attractive Art Deco style and included a large clock tower brandishing the company’s name on each clock face. The group of buildings on the site include a 500ft five storey factory block, the clock tower, administration block, time office and a liquor factory, all built in a matching style reflecting the strength and importance of Terry’s corporate image. The buildings are of strong historic significance as they represent the most complete surviving expression of the importance of chocolate production in York. This importance has earned the buildings grade II listed status. 1. That Staircase! The Terry’s Chocolate business itself has a longer past than the buildings. The original company was formed in 1767 by Messrs Bayldon and Berry, and only taking on the name of Terry’s when Joseph Terry joined in 1823, and finally became Terry’s of York in 1828. Joseph Terry was a chemist and put his skills to use developing new lines and perfecting the company’s chocolate and other products. By utilising the new North Eastern Rail Network the company was able to distribute its new products far and wide, while the River Humber provided a means for shipments of sugar and cocoa to be delivered. Frank and Noel Terry joined the business in 1923, revamping it and launching additional product lines to be produced at their new factory, known as Terry’s Confectionery Works. United Biscuits acquired Terry’s in 1975 but financial issues in the early 1990s saw Kraft Foods purchase the confectionery division. In 2004 Kraft foods transferred production to other factories in Europe and closed the York site with the loss of 300 jobs. 2. Terry’s Chocolate Works and Clock Tower Our Visit The Willy Wonka feel to this place and the epic Titanic-like staircase had placed this one right at the top of my list. It’s almost always sealed up tight so I didn’t expect I’d ever get a chance to see it, but while in the area with Proj3ctM4yh3m, PeterC4, Carl H and Philberto, we thought it might be worth stopping off to check. We got lucky! It may have taken a bit of effort and resulted in a trip to A&E but I managed to get in! Worth the effort I’d say! 3. Driveway 4. Admin Building 5. The Staircase 6. Under the Dome 7. Doorway 8. Panelling Detail 9. Room in the Chambre du Chocolate 10. Details 11. Through the Round Window 12. Chambre du Chocolate 13. Corridor 14. Large Space 15. Willy Wonka’s Office 16. The Big Man’s Toilet 17. Nice Room 18. Selfie on the Stair
  12. 2013: Not entirely sure on the status quo. 2010: History Pinched from Layz @ 28 days #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157624371589225/
  13. Terry's Chocolate Orange is a popular British chocolate product, made by Kraft Foods, originally sold only in the United Kingdom, but now sold all across the world. It is a ball of chocolate mixed with orange oil, divided into 20 "segments", similar to a real orange, and wrapped in orange-coloured foil. As the segments, when packaged, are stuck together firmly, the traditional method of getting ready to eat them is: prior to unwrapping the ball, to tap it severely on a hard surface to cause the segments to separate from each other. In the US market, where it has had a variety of importers over the years, it was briefly sold as a Tobler (maker of the Toblerone) product. Its history dates back to the 1920s, when the so-called "Chocolate Apple" was first produced, but the company has its roots in the 1820s. The orange was launched in the 1930s and was much more popular than the apple, leading to the apple's phasing out in 1954.[1] On 30 September 2005 the former Terry's Factory in York closed its doors for the last time with the loss of 350 jobs, with production moving out of Yorkand the UK for the first time to existing Kraft Foods facilities in Sweden, Belgium, Poland and Slovakia. O YEA THE FACTORY............... from the top of the clock tower Joseph Terry Sir Joseph Terry (7 January 1828 – 12 January 1898) was an English industrialist. Terry was born in York, England, and educated at St Peter's School, York. In 1854, he took over his father’s confectionery business, together with his two younger brothers. In 1864 he expanded the business by building a steam-powered factory in York. Two years later there were 400 separate items in the firm’s price list, mostly chocolate products. The business was incorporated as Joseph Terry & Sons Ltd. in 1895, by which time it had over 300 employees. In 1864, Terry married Frances, the daughter of Dr Joseph Goddard. They had three sons before she died in 1866. In 1871 he married Margaret, the daughter of William Thorpe of Aldborough House, Malton, Yorkshire, with whom he had a son and three daughters. His eldest son, Thomas, became a partner in the business in 1880. Terry served as Sheriff of York in 1870, and was Lord Mayor of the city on four occasions. He was knighted in 1887. He died of heart failure at the Royal Station Hotel on 12 January 1898, and was buried atYork Cemetery on 15 January 1898. History Joseph Terry became a partner in the confectionery business of Robert Berry in 1823. Robert Berry died and his son left the business in 1828. Joseph Terry then was left to expand the business before his death in 1850. The business was further developed by his son, Joseph Terry junior. Joseph Terry and Sons moved to the current site at South Bank in 1926. Terry’s was taken over by Kraft in 1993. They closed the York factory on 30 September 2005. Now called The Chocolate Works, development company Grantside Ltd has consulted local people on how to develop the site. A previous bid by the company to develop the site was rejected by the City of York Council. However, on 3 February 2010 the current planning application was accepted and the site will be developed with a mix of residential, commercial and leisure... Thanks for looking Oldskool........
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