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Found 8 results

  1. A personal favourite of myn. Had two visits here, one with no camera and another quick visit, due to pikeys being in here stripping it and one following me around, i valued my camera gear and my life so i left with only a handful of snapshots. Now well secured, with intercom warning if you get within a few metres of the perimeter. Clipstone Colliery was a coal mine situated near the village of the same name on the edge of an area of Nottinghamshire known as “The Dukeries†because of the number of stately homes in the area. The colliery was owned by the Bolsover Colliery Company and passed to the National Coal Board in 1947. The headstocks and powerhouse are grade II listed buildings. The colliery was sunk to exploit the Barnsley seam or “Tophardâ€, as it known locally. In the 1950s the shafts were deepened to over 1000 yards (920 m) to exploit other seams. The colliery was closed by British Coal, as the National Coal Board had become, in 1993 and reopened by RJB Mining (now UK Coal) in April 1994, the licence to dig for coal being limited to the Yard seam which is located at a depth of 957 yards (870 m). The colliery was finally closed in April 2003. Thanks for looking guys and gals
  2. Another great place to visit as most of you will know by now, Visited in may of 2013 with urban witness & urban sentry. It seamed like ages to walk over the field so we could approach from the rear of the place then finding the way in was also not such an easy task !! .... but needless to say we carried on looking and as you can see the rest is history HISTORY Clipstone Colliery was a coal mine situated near the village of the same name on the edge of an area of Nottinghamshire known as “The Dukeries†because of the number of stately homes in the area. The colliery was owned by the Bolsover Colliery Company and passed to the National Coal Board in 1947. The colliery was sunk to exploit the Barnsley seam or “Tophardâ€Â, as it known locally. In the 1950s the shafts were deepened to over 1000 yards (920 m) to exploit other seams. The colliery was closed by British Coal, as the National Coal Board had become, in 1993 and reopened by RJB Mining (now UK Coal) in April 1994, the licence to dig for coal being limited to the Yard seam which is located at a depth of 957 yards (870 m). The colliery was finally closed in April 2003.
  3. The first stop of my recent England road trip, having driven through the night to try get here for the sunrise, I arrived very early in the morning with JFR (my Scottish exploring buddy). The goal of this trip was too conquer the roadside headstock, after climbing to around 20feet from what I thought was the entry point to the roadside platform I was greeted with a vertical shaft with no more ladders. Having squeezed up what must have been 100+ feet of bird shit, nests, dead pigeons, buckets of grease and debris, it was obvious it was not going to be possible with my backpack on. Another visit will have to be made. So it was decided to climb to the easier headstock, but was also too late once we got there for proper sunrise pics. As the weather was much nicer than the last time we visited, I took the tripod up and whacked on the fisheye to have a bit of fun up top As this was JFR's first trip here we took a quick wander around the buildings, see if you can spot him creeping around Thanks for looking
  4. Quite a bit late with this report, but finally getting round to posting up some pics. After completing a early morning adventure at a nearby hospital Scattergun, Proj3ct M4yh3m, Lowri and two friends from Spain headed for this here. It was a bright sunny day, but it was also freezing cold, high winds and the distinct lack of sleep having been awake for some 30 odd hours SG and I wearily took on this place. I won't go into the history as it has been done a few times before. Under the expert guidance of Proj3ct M4yh3m and Lowri we left the ole fart SG in the car to catch 40 winks whilst we made our way into the site in broad daylight. Not a care in the world was given by passer-bys, thankfully! Access was fairly simple and we soon were inside wandering around the beast with the wind howling through, it was bloody cold but exciting place to be! Soon SG joined us and it was decided to head for the Headstock, in a mild gale with snow showers! Mr Vertigo himself crawling back down Very cool Spiral staircase Back inside it was time to grab a few more shots and try get some warmth in us. Couple externals before retreating to a hotel and some much needed sleep!
  5. Explored with Therealindianajones, Shush, Skankypants, and Pam
  6. One of my local haunts,been 3 times now,and still great..
  7. I feel like an idiot that this didnt get done sooner, I just never got round to it. Its really good-one of the best I have done....only 40 minutes away. If you haven't been then I recommend it, the size is unbelievable-something you cant really see in the pictures. A good day out with a solid crew-fun times. A bit of history: "Clipstone Colliery, is at Clipstone village in Nottinghamshire. The new village of Clipstone, was built on the site of Clipstone Army Camp in 1926 by the Bolsover Mining Company. It was built as a model village with the latest housing and facilities to provide accommodation and recreation for the mines workers. In 1912 the Bolsover Colliery Company leased 6,000 acres of mining rights form the Duke of Portland. A test bore found the 6ft Tophard seam of coal present at a depth of 640yds below surface. At the outbreak of war in 1914 the work on sinking of the shaft was suspended at a depth of 50 ft however the surface buildings such as the winding house went on to be completed. In 1919 work on the shaft recommenced and by 1922 the two 21ft diameter shafts were complete. Mining on the Tophard seam began in 1927. By WWII, the seam being worked was becoming exhausted, so deeper needed to be developed resulting in a programme of reconstruction/reorganisation being drawn up just after the war. The National Coal Board (NCB) implemented the scheme upon nationalisation in 1947-48. At surface, work had started fully by 1953. All the old equipment including the old steam winders, boilers, and fan, were scrapped and the winding houses, headframes, boiler house, fan house and heapstead buildings etc were demolished. They were replaced by new heapsteads, headframes, a fan house, and a winder/power house located between the two shafts, with two electrically powered winders. In the case of the winding system, a different form was used, this being a system already adopted in Europe named 'Koepe' or Friction winding. This uses a single loop of wire rope, or two or more ropes in parallel, and a powered pulley or 'Koepe' wheel to wind rather than the standard drum. The system is thus balanced, needing less power for operation. It was invented in Germany in 1877 by Frederick Koepe, the first British example being installed at Bestwood Colliery, Nottinghamshire, in the 1880s. It was not successful, and was soon removed. The system was installed at a few more collieries up to the 1930s, but did not enjoy widespread use. Clipstone was one of the first post war examples of this system, but surprisingly, here the NCB went for ground based winders, rather than the by now more usual system of winders installed in towers over the shafts. This required the use of headframes, and the ones at Clipstone have pulley wheels or 'sheaves' located one above the other being designed specifically for the Koepe winding system. The winding house contained the two electrically driven Koepe winders, and two motor generator sets to convert the local AC supply to DC. This configuration remained virtually unaltered until closure in 2003. The heapsteads are the two brick buildings beneath the headframes. The central winder house is a modern design of brick and glass. The two magnificent headframes, which were the tallest in the UK when built, standing at approximately 65m high, and act as local landmarks as they can be seen for a miles around dominating the skyline. The 1950s headgear and winder house were listed in 2000 as an "early example of the 'Koepe' system". Whilst they are not the first built, it seems that they are the earliest in situ example left in the UK. The architecture of these buildings is excellent for a post war twentieth century colliery. This technical interest has not stopped demolition proposals. In 2003, a referendum in Clipstone was held and the villagers voted for demolition of the whole site. The Coal Authority has made a listed building consent application for demolition, and everything except the tallest all metal headstocks in the country and the winder house and other immediate buildings have been demolished including the baths and coal hoppers. Even though the colliery never recorded a loss it was closed in 1993 and mothballed. It was re-opened in 1994 by RJB Mining (now UK coal) but finally closed in April 2003. This was one of 31 mines named for closure by British Coal but was to be the first to restart production under licence arrangements a full year ahead of the privatisation of the NCB. Production re-commenced in 1994 with six to seven years of reserves. After nine years the colliery had produced nearly four million tonnes of coal, but the other reserves remaining were not viable based upon their quality, high sulphur content and cost of accessing them." My pictures..... Full set on my Flickr+more HDR to hate on! thanking you.
  8. After seeing the recent reports and the fact that Maniac was up in Notts we decided to finally get our asses over to Clipstone Colliery. Not much of site remains however what does remain is very impressive. History - http://www.aditnow.co.uk/mines/Clipstone-Colliery-Coal-Mine/ On with pixz0rz (photobucket boarderz ftw) Guestbook Maniac Maniac at the top of one of the headstocks Well thats all folks, its a great little site, well worth the visit Peace Out, Shadz
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