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Found 3 results

  1. So this was more of a cheeky little explore than anything planned in advance. A few of us were in the South of France for the Urban Explorer Wedding of the Year, an event that was most definitely epic and involved many many drunken selfies of at least half a dozen drunken explorers (including the Bride and Groom) but hey that's another story and not one for here The day after we left the Bride and Groom to do Honeymoony type things and took ourselves off on a trip to the local cokeworks/coal miney type place. It isn't epic or awesome but it was a pretty damn fine mooch to end the trip with. It is a derpy derp and appears to be a popular place to burn out cars but worth a trip anyway History is limited and in French so here is my best shot at something that vaguely resembles information but however doesn't mean a great deal to me and is probably worth skipping lol!.... The Sainte Marie open pit was a coal mine of the Mining Unit of Tam, H.B.C.M. (Houilleres du Bassin Centre Midi), in the south-western part of France, near Albi. In this area, a large amount of coal has been exploited by Underground mining. This pit was designed in order to exploit the coal remaining around the shaft (Saint Marie shaft) of an old Underground mine situated in the basin of Carmaux.The diameter at the top of the pit was 1200 metres and its final depth was expected to be 300 metres. The first 100 metres were composed of tertiary deposits (clay and sand) which covered the carboniferous formation. The average slope angle of the Tertiary is 37° (without benches) and in the Coal Measures, it was foreseen from 37° to 50° (with benches of 6 metres high) depending on the slope situaüon. At present üme, the depth of the mine is about 160 metres. Nine coal seams have been mined by Underground working between 1900 and 1984. Different methods have been used depending on the thickness, the dip of the layer and the dimension of the panel. In fact, panels were backfilled, caved or undermined long-wall. The basin of Carmaux is a large synclinal split by a dense network of faults which directions are approximately N 140 E. The dips and the dip directions which was left around the shaft, but, close to the slopes, begin the old exploited long walls. These long walls are at different topographic levels due to the particular structure and have been exploited in panels lined by the faults odented approximately N140. The first design of the open pit was done by a Standard geotechnical survey; this one has taken into account the geomechanical, hydrogeological, structural Parameters äs well äs the "decohesion", induced by the revival of subsidence due to old Underground mining. However, some mining slopes can locally present risks of slipping induced by old Underground mining. Anyway here are a few pics Thanks for looking
  2. Cwm Coke Cokeworks, Beddlau, South Wales – March 2015 Wow, this is one I have wanted to do for years and finally I got to see it. Me and Southside Assassin loaded up the car and headed off for a mixed weekend away in Wales. After taking a wrong turn and ending 20 miles too far from the location, we headed in the RIGHT direction and arrived on site mid morning. The site is huge and we also met up with Hamtagger and Geoff later on. Got some amazing photos and videos here and thought we would try our luck on the elevators. I would try this on a more still day and obviously tread carefully as you ascend, looking at any movements. They seemed pretty solid on our visit. The trip was sadly cut short when one of our groups was spotted while snapping an external, meaning we covered the whole site but not the main room that we had saved till last  A brief paragraph about Coke from wiki: History Borrowed and Adjusted from H1971’s 2013 report on 28 days Dating back as far as 1909; when the Great Western Colliery Co. began sinking pits to provide steam coals for the Great Western Railway. By 1914 coal was being produced on the Colliery, all of which came from two shafts named Magaret and Mildred, which were over 750 yards deep. In 1928 Powell Duffryn Associated Colleries ltd took over the colliery which employed approximately 1000 men and continued production under this name until 1947; at which point, The National Coal Board was established to run the nationalised coal mining industry in Britain. Between the years 1952 and 1960 the colliery underwent an extensive £9 million reconstruction scheme which included linking CWM to Coedely Tonyrefail. By the 1970s around 1,500 men were producing 515,000 tons of coke on a yearly basis at CWM until the privatisation of the National Coal Board in 1986. The Colliery ceased production in 1986 although there were an estimated 80 million tonnes of coal seams and reserves still there which were never mined. CWM Coke was designed to centralise and maintain the production of South Wales foundry coke. The coal mined at CWM was suitable for foundry coke given its low sulphur content The coke works continued to run after the colliery’s 1986 closure and ceased production in June of 2002. The MASSIVE site has sat rotting ever since. In true Landie Style I have SMASHED the 10 photo thing, I usually allow myself to creep up to 13 or so, but this site took my breath away. The decay just makes it, its amazing here. And hey we all have fast connections these days right? #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #-VIDEO- Climbing the Elevators https://youtu.be/wJT2haGI0_U Thanks again guys :-) More (If you want!!) At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157651326002345/
  3. Was originally going to post a few pics in the comments on Fat Pandas report as I visited with him but had quite a few pics so thought i'd throw a report together! Coke Manufacturing (Monckton) Coke has been made on the Monckton site at Royston near Barnsley in South Yorkshire for over 130 years. Until December 2014, Monckton was the only independent coke production plant in the UK, and was ranked as one of Europe’s leading producers of high-quality metallurgical coke. On 12 December 2014, the Company confirmed that, with no significant improvement in market conditions or customer demand, Monckton was to close, with coke production ceasing during that month. The Monckton plant is now being de-commissioned and this is expected to take approximately six months. The gas from Monckton coke ovens is used in a combined heat and power plant that can generate up to 11 megawatts of electricity. Not only does this supply all the electricity needed on-site, we actually sell our surplus electricity to the national grid – enough to provide power for more than 1,000 homes. Here's my take on this place Thanks for looking
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