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Found 15 results

  1. After a 3am start and awesome morning at Haslar we headed through London to Colchester to go to Severalls. on arrival just as we was about to negotiate the palisade security flew round the corner in his van and spotted us so we hid in the overgrowth for a short while until the coast was clear, after we was inside we thought any moment that Micheal was going to pop out of nowhere and bust us but due to being careful we managed a good couple hours in there until darkness fell and we headed to the main gates and gave ourselves up instead of going back over the fence! First time using the new camera today finally invested in a decent camera instead of using the trusty old gopro and after spending half the day messing around with settings I managed to come up with enough pics for a report, barely scratched the surface when I visited last month! Visited with Fat Panda, Seldom Seen and a non member Hope you enjoyed
  2. Finally got to visit the place that sparked my addiction to these places and it was worth the wait! after unintentionally using some other lads we bumped into as bait for the secca we made our way round the endless corridors like headless chickens trying to decide which way to go and after just short of 2 hours we walked straight into security! probably the most friendly I've bumped into yet and nicely pointed out the best bits on our long walk out, all of which we missed ! Apologies if the fish-eye is too much pics shot from my gopro! The History Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex, UK was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 and opened in May 1913. The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on a plan whereby wards, offices and services were within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between in the years after its opening. Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy.. A change in management during the 1960s (and likely a change in social acceptances) saw reforms introduced including the creation of art and music therapy programs and the widespread use of drugs and medication. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospita Thanks for looking
  3. Old Odeon/Regal cinema, Colchester, Essex - October 2014 Intro This had been on my list for too long, unsure why as from what I could see, it was absolutely trashed and pretty much covered in faeces. But despite this I persevered and I'm glad I did. Despite it being trashed and a bit of a dump, it was pretty nice, loved the explore and it was definitely a long anticipated one! Been on my list for around a year. As always, pictures at the end, enjoy. History The old Odeon cinema was formerly the Regal cinema. It was designed by Cecil Masey, a well-known cinema architect, and built in 1931. It has a Spanish-style gabled front and originally had an 'atmospheric' interior and included a café, Wurlitzer organ, and full stage facilities, with flanking shops on the ground-floor frontage. It opened in February 1931, originally, with an Atmospheric style interior and seating 1,446, it was built for the local David Agar circuit. The designs by architect Cecil Masey also featured a café, and it was equipped with a Wurlitzer 2Manual/5Ranks organ and full stage facilities. Taken over by the County Cinemas chain in March 1935, they were taken over by the Oscar Deutsch chain of Odeon Theatres Ltd. in 1938. The Regal cinema was closed in 1944, when it was damaged by a fire, and it remained closed for three months while repairs were carried out. It was renamed 'Odeon' in September 1961. The building was extensively remodelled in 1964; 10 years later the interior was completely reconstructed to provide three screens, and it became the Odeon film centre; a fourth screen was added in 1987 and two more in 1991 when alterations to the building gave a 30 per cent increase in seating capacity. The old dressing rooms were used as a base for Hospital Radio Colchester from 1975 to 1990. In 1992 the Odeon was the only cinema in Colchester. Later, three additional screens were added, bringing the total to six. The cinema then closed on Sunday, October 13, 2002 when Odeon relocated to a new purpose built 8-screen multiplex nearby in Head Street. Live performances were presented at the Regal/Odeon as well as films - for example, on the 8th September 1964, the Rolling Stones played two concerts here! The interior was subdivided in 1974 and the cinema closed in 2002. Now empty, the building was put up for sale in March 2012 ('... Colchester's former Odeon cinema is up for sale with a price tag of £1.5 million ...', 6th March, Essex County Standard). James Bettley, an architectural historian, describes it as 'A distinctive building and an increasingly rare survival'. The old cinema is referred to in the prestigious architectural guide 'The buildings of England: Essex', written by Niklaus Pevsner in 1954 and updated by James Bettley in 2007. Cecil A Masey LRIBA (1880-1960) designed a large number of cinemas in England and was also joint architect in 1937, with famous architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, of the iconic National Theatre on the South Bank in London. He also designed the Phoenix Theatre in London. The building plans of the old Odeon cinema are held by the Essex Record Office in Chelmsford; they were produced by Masey for D Ager and others (owners), in association with builders W. Chambers and Son and Pitchers Construction Co. Ltd. The old Odeon cinema in Colchester has a well-documented history, with a section in 'On Screen Colchester: The Story of Colchester's Cinemas'. There is a film documentary, c 1930, of the building of the Colchester Regal cinema, held by the East Anglian Film Archive: http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/212013 There is also some footage of Crouch Street, including the cinema, taken in 1961: http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/212940 The cinema's Wurlitzer organ (Opus 1840) survives and its story is posted at http://www.theatreorgans.co.uk/featu.../Opus1840.html - made in 1928 in the US, it was installed in the Regal in 1931 and stayed there until 1963. The cinema played a significant role in people's lives before television. It is possible that more people went into the old Odeon than any other building in the town. Eric Rudsdale, the wartime diarist of Colchester, recorded his visit to the Regal; also see the personal recollections in 'New Regal brought welcome boost to the building industry' - http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/l...al_brought_wel... and 'A Young Boy's War in Addlestone and Ardleigh' by h albion, part of the BBC's WW2 People's War project, at http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peop...a2045503.shtml http://www.colchesterhistoricbuildin...ldings_gallery Theatres trust archives: http://www.theatrestrust.org.uk/reso...eon-colchester Present Apart from the obvious muck, dirty and scummy rotting boards that have plastered the front façade, the only concern or two I'd have is the damp and maybe the cracks, it doesn't look like it's subsidence as such (at least I hope not) but it's very crumbly and you can see the crack relatively clearly. Although this probably just the damp having it's affect on the external walls. Inside it's relatively similar, from what I can gather the original 1930's ceiling has decayed more and a gaping whole has surfaced towards the front. The wooden boards are surprisingly strong and don't seem to have rotten as much as you'd expect, the lower levels haven't flooded and the only major let downs were the lack of seats and all the rubbish on both, the outside, and in the screens. Rubbish as in, decaying pigeon and pigeon poo, cider bottles and prams. As far as I could see, the only graffiti is around the front, on the windows. A building still possible to renovate, but I assume the cost would be phenomenal. Especially if they have to first secure £1.5 Million to buy the place before work even starts. Future The future of this once thriving building has remained uncertain for some time. The owner had bought the site a while ago and submitted plans to convert it into a night club in 2008 (what an original idea! ), he was then refused the application and begun looking at options of demolition and re-development into housing. (http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/9..._pull_it_down/) COLCHESTER’S former Odeon cinema is likely to be demolished and the site redeveloped. Steve Peri, owner of the rundown Crouch Street building says he has abandoned plans to convert the old building into a giant nightclub. Instead he is considering other options, such as building shops and homes on the site. The entrepreneur says with local clubs such as Route closing because of dwindling trade, he no longer feels a large nightclub would be viable. He explained: “To make the Odeon cinema into a nightclub, as it is, is not worth it. “We’re looking at other projects at the moment – maybe putting flats there or knocking it down, or maybe putting a bar and nightclub there, but not a superclub with a restaurant. “It’s going to cost quite a bit. We’re talking probably about 25 to 30 flats and retail units, plus underground parking. “We’re working on it at the moment and hope by the summer we can come up with a decision.†The cinema opened in 1931 and is not a listed building, though it is on Colchester Council’s local list of notable buildings. Its fabric has gradually deteriorated since it closed as a cinema in 2002. Steve Levy, of Victor Hawkins Jewellers, said he would be happy to see the cinema go. He felt Colchester Council should have taken action to keep it in better shape. Then, in October 2013, plans were submitted to re-develop the site, demolishing all of it, including the front façade. The facade of the building is set to be demolished and a new one re-built, albeit identical (we assume to allowed large construction vehicles through to the site). Its heart will be removed and replaced by a large imposing glass windowed building that will dominate the skyline of Colchester. This will not be in keeping with the local archecture of Britain’s oldest recorded town. Locals opposed the pans and began a petition: http://www.change.org/p/help-us-save...rom-demolition http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/1...for_old_Odeon/ A NEW vision for Colchester's old Odeon cinema site has been revealed by developers. Plans to build a hotel and apartment complex have been radically altered. Revised plans have ditched the hotel element and set the luxury apartments away from Crouch Street around a courtyard. The Art Deco façade of the former cinema will be kept and restored, and developers say once planning permission work can begin immediately. A few articles have been posted in attempt to convince the locals it will help the community: http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/1...Crouch_Street/ http://www.chelmsfordweeklynews.co.u..._oasis/?ref=mr What is supposed to be happening with the site: As far as I can tell, Colchester council have yet to confirm the plans, and were supposed to decide in November. My visit I'd read the past reports for about a year, so I was studying them to see what I could do different, how I could get in, and how I could find myself around. A mate wanted to come along with me again for some time and I suggested this after he saw a few pics from the ABC cinema in Southend, ever since then I've wanted to get into another cinema, and this one was the one I desperately wanted to say I had done before it's finally gone. Access was thoroughly enjoyable, I'm not sure why, but it was pretty easy and just relaxed. Externally, it looks quite aged and very derelict, but is very characteristic. We had a bit of a look around first of all, found our way in and had a very relax explore (apart from the pigeons of course, but it's a derelict cinema, there will be pigeons), enjoyed spying on the public in Crouch St as they wandered past oblivious. Wandered round a bit more, then headed it. Pictures This hadn't been reported since 2012 I believe, and thought, for those that went, it might be nice to see it again. I tried to get different pictures, or similar pictures but maybe with different lighting, just to try and get something different I suppose! I hope you enjoy, my camera was messing me about and I was getting rather annoyed with it. I don't know what's wrong with it, but it's annoying as. Externals Cheers
  4. SEVERALLS HOSPITAL - DECEMBER 2014 Severalls Hospital history The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990's following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, as a temporary building for the nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the central boiler house in 2007. In 2008 the sale of the hospital site, including its extensive grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the building industry. Planning permission was however granted in 2011 to redevelop the site. Today Building work is now up to the perimeter of the main site on the eastern side. This includes the construction of a new road that will link the A12 with the junction of the Northern Approach Road and Mill Road which covers land where several villa's once stood along with part of the former cricket pitch. As a consequence the dog walker's path is closed whilst the new road(s) intersect it. In my theory the new road will provide a good way to carry poor old Severalls away once demolition starts, as it avoids the majority of residential areas with a useful direct link to the A12. The new road is now nearing completion and a spur from the new link road leads ominously up to the main perimeter fence. This year, could be her last... The explore Spending all night in an asylum has been on my mooching bucket list for sometime. I wanted to experience Severalls at night (and no - it has nothing to do with ghost c**ting), but all to do with atmosphere and the gradual change from night to day and taking away (hopefully) a few half decent snaps. Explored in the always excellent company of Hamtagger and Matt Inked. It is surreal to be on a Friday late night train from Liverpool Street, stuffed full of very loud pissed up city types heading home to middle England and ponder that in just over an hours time they will all be left behind and home for the next ten and a half hours will be exclusively peaceful... 1. Full moon - it was not to be sadly. 2. Day room.. at night. 3. 4. Ok, i can hear: "what the hell is that?". I liked this effect, night sky on glazed tiles in the smaller kitchen. 5. Cold kitchen. Yes, it really was cold - middle of winter is always the best time to do an all nighter . 6. On to the next day and ablutions time. 7. I think we were feeling 'vacant' after ten plus hours... 8. Far Male Wards. These were at least 20 degrees warmer than the female side for anyone thinking of repeating this exercise. 9. 10. 11. 12. Severalls one and only chair. With the bed gone, this is the only comfort around . 13. 14. Path to paradise. Thanks for looking folks!!
  5. Visited with Hamtagger and Session9 It's been a while, but I'm back and I'm staying here for good. 2015 should be full of awesome explores so I'll be posting a lot more often on here now. Severalls was one of the first places I ever wanted to do but due to distance it took a while to happen. We set off from Lincoln and had a 3 hour drive down to Colchester to experience what has to be the coldest night of my life! When we arrived outside Severalls the only way in seemed like a bit of a ball shredder so we walked around the outside of the Fences for a while in the dark before going to collect Session9 from the train station. When we got back to Severalls we stuck with the first ball shredding access point and luckily all 6 of our testicles were still intact. The night then consisted of eating cold food from Ration packs, numb fingers and various banging noises from the ground floor. Hamtagger cheated death by about 3 inches when he looked back and saw a huge hole in the floor leading to the basement. (Exploring in the dark is dangerous kids) After about 9 hours inside we went to one of the bigger rooms to wait for the sunrise. Somehow we managed to fall asleep in temperatures of about -9 and woke up feeling colder and more tired than before with no sunrise After another hour of taking some daylight shots we decided that the easiest way out was to bump into security (The ball shredder didn't seem as appealing when you have no energy whatsoever) He was a nice bloke and said he always finds Explorers wandering around. He told us a story about how the week before he bumped into some Younger lads (Around 18 years old) who actually ran away and cried when he caught them and begged him not to hit them (Own up if you're on here, we won't laugh....Much) We left Severalls (Without shedding a single tear or shredding a single ball) History Lesson The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990's following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, as a temporary building for the nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the central boiler house in 2007. In 2008, the sale of the hospital site, including its extensive grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the building industry. Planning permission was however granted in 2011 to redevelop the site. Pictures 1. 2. This is where the "Secreta" worked 3. The Water Tower with a bit of moon showing (I was hoping this would turn out better when I took it) 4. The paintings down this corridor must have taken a while 5. My personal favourite from the explore. This room was pitch black and we were all taking seperate pictures so I took advantage of the lights everyone else was using. 6. This is the Sillouhette of the Giant that is Session9 7. Who's up for a double dip? 8. Light Painting took up at least 70% of out time here... 9. More light painting. Either Security were blind or lazy. 10. Toilet doors Thank you for taking time to read my report and Happy New Year
  6. After my initial introduction on OS I have been severely lacking in effort getting any reports up (apologies!) so though I might as well start with one of the "classics"! History Everybody knows the history of Sevs by now but for parity’s sake… Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex, United Kingdom was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 to the design of architect Frank Whitmore. It opened in May 1913. The 300-acre site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence) The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. A few of the satellite villas as of 2013 are still operational as research facilities on the edge of the site. This includes "Chestnut Villa" (originally Children's Villa), which provides laboratory services, and "Willow House" (originally Male Acute Ward), and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). "Rivendell", a more modern building is still in use at the entrance to the site. Apart from Chestnut Villa, all remaining Buildings still in use are owned and run by North Essex Partnership University Foundation Trust (NEPFT). Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally, the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the Central Boiler House in 2007. In 2008, the sale of the hospital site, including its extensive grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the building industry. The Explore Visited on a clear and chilly morning with a regular exploring buddy. We arrived before sunrise to scout out our entry. Straight away we had a couple of close shaves with a van patrolling the external perimeter and then the finishing night shift passing us very close by just as we reached the fence. After biding our time, sitting tight for a short while and with daylight fast approaching we finally hit the fence and were surprisingly up and over the tackle mashing palisade quicker than expected and made our way inside. Now I know every man and his dog has had a go at Sevs and it has a reputation of being a bit a “tourist†site these days but I can now see why it’s so popular. The place is vast, with all those never ending corridors, buildings galore and everything you would expect from your typical asylum. Seeing the place unfold in front of us just as the sun came up, beautifully lit and cloaked in the early morning mist really was a sight to behold. We managed to spend just over four hours inside and covered best part of the east side of the site. As we began making our way towards the western side our luck finally ran out. Upon trying to squeeze through a tight door into one of the corridors who should I see standing at the end of the corridor facing the other way but security. Wedged in the door I couldn’t enter the corridor for obvious reasons and it would have made too much noise trying to exit back out so the best I could do was hide in the doorway and hope our high-viz adorned friend carried on in the other direction. Sadly it wasn’t to be and with a polite “Hello†we were busted. Michael had claimed another scalp. Credit to Michael, he was extremely professional but polite and it was a pleasure to finally meet the legend. After the usual formalities he kindly showed us the way out. Overall it was an enjoyable day at a beautiful site. I never did get to visit this gift shop that everybody talks about though… My photos don't do it justice but the light on the cobwebs covered in morning dew was amazing The obligatory morgue shot My exploring buddy The fateful door where our day ended . Didn't realise I had shot it earlier in the day until reviewing my pics! Hope you enjoyed
  7. Severalls, a heads up.

    Hi guys, I haven't been on the forums much recently (been busy mostly with my new born, but some of it's laziness) but thought I would give you guys a heads up. We were at Sev's this morning for a silly o'clock start and after a 5-6 hour mooch about and on our way out we got busted by Michael accompanied by a Police Officer. Now we had a good chat with them both and they were friendly enough but it turns out the NHS has been getting pissed off with people getting in, so now it seems the cops will be called out every time security thinks they are in the building so they can run name checks (due to people using 'Mickey Mouse' names) and search anyone caught. So I was informed the NHS are looking to make an example of people going in. The Police let us go as they didn't see any reason to take it further their side however we were informed to expect a letter from the NHS with a possible civil prosecution. How I have been lucky enough enough not to get caught in 4 years but everyone's luck runs out some day, but getting accused of breaking and entering and tearing down the water towers palisade fence was a bit nerve racking when you know you haven't done anything wrong. I get the feeling the NHS are trying to pin anything which happens on the site to anyone caught. We will see what happens. This might be nothing to some of you but I though I would let people know that Sev's might not be the easy ride it has been regarding security any more, hats off to Michael though, he was very fair and very professional, and after a bit of a cat and mouse game I felt very good at his job. Anyway just a little shot from the day:
  8. The explore... A very early start again, a liquid monster breakfast, and a couple of hour drive down to collect S9, then onwards to begin the longest explore to date. High spirits and expectations were quickly dashed on arrival as we spotted a hi-viz from a distance near our planned entry point and the next hour and a half was spent trying to outwit him. After a textbook flanking manoeuvre we made our entry and blood was drawn in the process. The next 8 ½ hours was asylum heaven. Pretty much everything here for the derp-addict. Met up with the Hi-viz secca man at the end, as we couldn’t be arsed climbing out again, so waited for him to find us. He was a very pleasant chap and was quite bemused that it was us, still here since the morning encounter. He scribbled down our made-up names and addresses and let us out through another gate (about 600 miles from my car). Another can of Redbull was consumed for the looong drive back to Lincoln. Some history and pictures below, hope you like! Severalls Hospital history (stolen from S9 thanks mate) The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990's following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, as a temporary building for the nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the central boiler house in 2007. In 2008, the sale of the hospital site, including its extensive grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the building industry. Planning permission was however granted in 2011 to redevelop the site. Today Building work is now up to the perimeter of the main site on the eastern side. This includes the construction of a new road that will link the A12 with the junction of the Northern Approach Road and Mill Road. As a consequence the dog walker's path is closed whilst the new road(s) intersect it. It seems unclear when work will start on the main site. Much was made of the announcement late last year that work would start this year, but rumour has it, that this has fallen through, yet again. In my theory the new road will provide a good way to carry poor old Severalls away once demolition starts, as it avoids the majority of residential areas with a useful direct link to the A12. If the redevelopment has fallen through, it can only mean this Essex beauty spot can be enjoyed for sometime yet. Thanks again to Session9 for a cracking day! 1. Exterior 2. 3. Once A 2000 bed asylum, where did all the other beds go? 4. 5. Found this little dude, half cocooned, in a basement and spent quite a while witnessing his birth, not a dry eye in the place haha 6. Day Room 7. Wall Mural 8. Turd Area. Why didn't I open those two first doors for a better shot?! 9. The most photogenic corridor in my opinion, really liked the pastel colours in this one. 10. Medium-level bombing 11. Astro-turf, derpy radiators, and a tree. 12. Anyone know what the yellow bars are? 13. 14. X-Ray Dept. 15. Hard to get away from the corridor porn in this place 16. The dangers of Vindaloo 17. Yes, I checked, and no 18. Mmmmm, corridors 19. 20. Kitchen Area 21. My toilet obsession, eh S9? 22. Selfie to end with. Picture credit to Session9 Thanks for looking everyone. Feedback appreciated as always
  9. Well... I thought it was about time I ventured over to the mighty Severalls to see what all the fuss is about! Along with 28DL member '12318', a sparrow-fart early start was in order and off we trotted! Access was up to the usual Sevs standard but we did it with a bit of perseverance, ignoring the inbuilt brain fault telling us "how difficult a climb can it be?"....! Once inside we headed round in the comfort of the buildings and, following the corridors, ventured around maybe half of the site until... Graham the Security guard put an end to our joviality! To be fair, he is one of the good guys and politely escorted us off site, telling us of the plethora of 'urbexers' he's had the pleasure of meeting. So, despite our stealthy prowess... we were rumbled! Unfortunate, as we were getting into our stride and had managed to see a bag full of the delights inside. Perhaps another day to finish the job! Here's a bit of history: Situated just north of Colchester (The oldest recorded town in Britain, apparently), Severall's Asylum was built in 1910 and opened it's doors for the treatment of patient's with mental health issues by 1913. The hospital, owned by Essex County Council, was the second one built in Essex to help accommodate patients in addition to Warley Hospital near Brentwood. It's design was the combined effort of F Whitmore and W.H. Town in the Edwardian 'Art & Crafts' style of facing red brickwork and large sash, bay windows giving it a simple, yet elegant look. Being connected by a huge network of corridors, the staff were able to navigate to all parts of the complex and the functional buildings housed everything from in-patient accommodation, wards and isolation units, to kitchens, laundry and workshop facilities to keep the hospital pretty much self sufficient. The hospital faithfully served Colchester and the wider community for nearly ninety years and survived two World Wars despite being bombed in 1942 by the German Luftwaffe who mistook the hospital for a factory, resulting in the tragic deaths of 38 patients. Many more were wounded. The hospital finally succumbed to the 'Mental Health & Care in the Community Act', closing it's doors for the last time in 1997. Numerous planning applications have been submitted since the hospital's closure but haven't seen any development or restoration work commence. Speaking to Graham the security bloke today confirmed that the demolition of the entire site is imminent, but, this has been mentioned countless times over the last fifteen years or so and could just be a usual ploy to discourage further breaches. I'd like to think we'll get another chance to see all we missed today but if these rumours are indeed true, the end of Severall's could be on the horizon. Here are some of the 177 shots I took today. I hope you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed taking them and I'm glad I got the chance to cross this one off the list! Apologies for this being a bit image-heavy and all in mono... erm... I'm not sorry really! A truly magnificent place and such a shame to see it in a state of disrepair... but then again, it wouldn't hold the same appeal if it was normal! Thanks for having a look... and thanks again to 28DL member 12318 for joining me and not pointing and laughing at this middle-aged loser trying to scale fences designed for a Russian gymnast!
  10. Hi all Some may recognise the username from 28DL but, having just found out about this forum, thought I'd sign up here too to broaden my horizons..! Am living in Colchester, Essex so lots of places lined up (and a fair few done already..!) Will get some of my reports on here in the coming weeks, but in the meantime for those who can be bothered here is my Flickr page https://www.flickr.com/photos/97424506@N08/sets/ Cheers!!
  11. Colchester Garrison - fire

    Hello All I know a number of you took the time to visit the old barracks in colchester a while ago Now it seems there is a bit less to look at A lot of it has undergone redevelopment in the past couple of years, and so it seems the developers have hired their monkeys to make short work of a bit more of it The former swimming pool was set on fire in the early hours of this evening UPDATED: Fire crews tackle blaze in former garrison buiding (From Essex County Standard) Best picture out of the lot; Wonder when the Admin building a bit further down the road will go...
  12. Well I finally managed to drag my arse up here and take a look at the place. I've been meaning to do this for years, so when Raptor Jesus and me were contemplating how to fill what would otherwise have been a fairly boring Sunday, a text from Kent Urbex asking if I knew what the state of play was at Severalls spawned a plan. Roll forwards to the next day and there we were poised to do battle with the infamous severalls fence - made all the more difficult because I'd forgotten to pack the straps normally used for such occurances. Never mind, we found a few helpful items lying around to assist us, and before we knew it we were over and inside. There have been recent developments here, most of the trees and vegitation have been cleared from around the perimeter and there's now 2 fences round a majority of the site. Thanks to Dubbed Navigator for some hints on water tower access and for navigating us to a good spot to get in! Severalls was, as most of you undoubtably know, a mental institution in the town of Colchester which closed in the late 90's. It's quite special in a way, as there's really not many of these asylums left now, the golden age for exploring them has long since passed and most of them have been demolished or re-developed. This will eventually be the fate of this place as well, so any of you procrastinating about a visit here, just do it and see it before it goes as you'll kick yourself if you don't! Visited with Raptor Jesus, Kent Urbex and for part of the day with Dubbed Navigator. Didn't get many photos I was happy with, the place is very empty really, but I shall stick up a small selection below. View from the top of the water tower Wasn't expecting to find this at the bottom, I'm sure there must have been photos posted before, but I didn't remember seeing them. Thanks for looking. Maniac.
  13. Yep another sevs report.we havnt done it so after the news of the plans for the place a decision was made and we headed up for our first explore of the day! Now Obscurity has been bust at the fence before so was looking to get it done,and done it was we used our urbex trampoline to deal with that palisade and ninja'd our wayin..shortly after to be followed by Olz9181 and his mate (sorry mate forgot yer name..been a long day)..quick chat and intorductions and we went our seperate ways! History has been done to death so here's http://severallsmentalhospital.co.uk/#/ ... 4532878444 Got to a point we could hear what sounded like a power tool being used and some distant banging so as we had spent quite a while in here decided to Gtfo.. Visited with Space Invader and Obscurity Not gunna go to mad with the pics im sure you have all seen the place by now... sorry love them corridors.. With a bit of info (cheers dicky)we where sure we where gunna nail the tower..but it wasnt to be.. Thanks to Obscurity for driving and too both of you for a long but fun day! Just for nelly one pano
  14. Copford Place is a 18th century Grade II listed building in the village of Copford, 5 miles west of Colchester British History Online has this to say about it..... "Apparently late 17th century, a two storeyed, sevenbayed, doublepile house that forms the south range of Copford Place; it contains a chimneypiece dated 1698 and other fittings of about that date. The house probably then faced the road and was of red brick like the stable to the north. In the early 19th century the house was extended northeast by two bays to create an east entrance and given plain classical white brick fa¸ades. In 1947 it was converted into private accommodation for elderly people, and in 1980 taken over by Help the Aged which in 1998 refurbished the house as self contained flats" Explored this place straight after a Laurel and Hardy style explore at Severalls, I came away feeling disappointed with this house but then I suppose after Severalls then this was like a polished turd!! Sorry for the flash photos, it was boarded top and bottom In the attic room we found a squat. It was very tidy with no damage. It had obviously only been occupied by one person, there was a sleeping bag, his shoes, saucepans, a CD player etc. The sell by dates on the food wrappers went back to 2009, I felt sorry for the guy, I think that he may have come back to find the place boarded and fenced with all his gear inside. The Barn - This is also a Grade II listed building
  15. One of the most impressive things that I have ever seen. The size of the place and the sheer scale cannot be described, the corridors that stretch seemingly for miles and the surprises that await around every corner. The History Severalls Hospital was the second Essex County Asylum - opening in 1913 to relieve pressure from the Warley Asylum. Designed by F.Whithouse & W.H.Town, the site was continually added to between 1910 and 1935, and this is reflected in the different styles present. The asylum was situated on 300 acres of the Severalls estate, which was sold to the Essex County Council in 1904 and its doors were opened to patients in 1913; at its peak it housed over 2000 patients, both in main wards and the outlaying villas. Interestingly the chimney attached to the water tower was lowered by one third of its height during World War Two to prevent it being a hazard to crippled bombers landing at a nearby US airbase Happy New Year!!! Thanks for taking the time
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