Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'decay'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 56 results

  1. UK Crookham Court April 2013

    Shot a few years ago before all the vandalism. No edits just a walk around. Was such a lovely place then. I believe restoration work is now well ongoing. This is great to hear. Thanks for looking I got plenty more films in the pipeline.
  2. Belgium Rusty & Dusty

    Once in a while, I get actually excited about industrial locations, not that often to be honest but still. This was one of those moments, they even started demolishing parts of it, but still I thought it was worth a visit when the workmen had a day off. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
  3. Matthews' Equestrian Center (Or Matthew's Riding School) was a well known, and well used site in medway, featuring on local and national media over the years. The equestrian centre is now in a very run down state, where flytipping is common. The site is badly damaged through fire and vandalism, though, some remains almost intact. The upper floors are difficult to walk on, due to incredibly thin wooden boards supported by rotting timber beams. The building is quite open to the elements, with a broken roof and in some places a non-existent roof. This is my first report, which will be quite picture heavy - Any criticisms will appreciated. And here is one piece of graffiti that we just quite like
  4. Hey folks sorry I have not posted in sometime been rather busy with so many trips an projects at the moment. Here is a wonderful decaying carehome, its closure was around 2000 an since natural decay has set in wonderfully, maybe too much as when you reach the top of the main staircase dont turn left as I figured out, the floors like wallpaper an lucky the radiator was there to "save" me. Anyway after exploring around here, we set off to some other places but upon our return home, my partner did not like her shots, so the next day we went back Enjoy the piccys! Thanks for looking everyone
  5. Belgium Huize Godelieve

    The only information I have about this one is coming from my grandparents, who used to know the people that lived there. It was the house of the principal of a little school close by, sadly enough they demolished it before I was into urbex. They called the man "mister pipe" since he always walked around smoking a pipe
  6. I finally got around to post this report, so here goes: If you didn't get to see my previous Belgium report, feel free to take a peek: 48 hours in Belgium 2014 I wake up in my hotel room in Amsterdam, later I'm going to meet up with @Merryprankster, @The_Raw and a non-member (Jane) in Antwerp, for some kick-ass urban exploration days. I grab a trusty sandwich and make my way to downtown Amsterdam. It is incredibly hot, hitting around 30 °C and I'm about to catch a train to Antwerp. The entire station is crowded and I can't find my train, which is supposed to depart in a few minutes. I finally find a train conductor who can tell me where to go. I make it to the correct platform, just as the train is rolling in. I get on the train, but just like the station, it's cramped. I literally end up sitting between two peoples luggage – but there's air-condition, so I can't really complain. Two hours and a pair of sore legs later, I'm finally there. The door opens to another train carriage, and it hits me… The stench of the sweat from 15 persons, all mixed together in a hot train-pot and left simmering for a few hours. I was told that our carriage, was the only one with functioning air-condition and I'm inclined to believe the person who told me that. I make my way through Central Antwerp Station and it's such a beautiful place, if you haven't seen it, google it. And knowing that I would be standing at the top of it all, gave me butterflies in my stomach. I head down to our hotel for the night, where I'm meeting with the rest of the guys. After our greetings and a few necessary ice creams, we make our way to: Château de la Chapelle. As the name might suggest, it's a large residential building. Complete with its own wine cellar and chapel. The size and number of chairs, suggests to me that it was used for weddings or the likes. The were signs of construction and I think it's definitely it's worth saving. A very beautiful building. The entire house is protected by a moat, where I managed to get a VERY wet shoe. I was later reminded of my clumsiness by another Belgian explorer: “I think you're the first one getting wet feet there”. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. After trying out another spot and not finding a way in, we head back to Antwerp. A take a quick shower and we head downtown for a copious amount of cheap chips. A big shoutout to The_Raw and The Antwerp crew for getting us up on: Antwerp Central Station The original station building was constructed between 1895 and 1905 and is regarded as one of the finest transportation buildings in Belgium – and I can see why. The station itself has four levels, with three levels for tracks, 14 platforms in use and a shopping center on the fourth level. The station also houses a diamond gallery with more than 30 diamond shops. Most likely a once in a lifetime experience to explore this. 11. (The station in the distance) 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. After the exploration, I wasn't feeling too well, so I got our only room key and went home for the night and the others went to explore a few other places. I was awoken early in the morning by a loud banging on the door. I opened the door to a very stern looking The_Raw. When he got home after the explore, I slept right through his door knocking and he therefor went to sleep on the roof of the hotel. Beers were brought as an apology. We made our way to Château Nottebohm. Château Nottebohm is cottage-style manor built in 1908 and it's history is a bit unclear. Some say it was built for the family Nottebohm, who were a very prominent family and known for their work in curing skin diseases, the manor was later occupied during WWII and during the 50's used as a hotel, banquet hall and restaurant. Others claim it was a wealthy German family living in the manor, whom fled during WWII and it was since left to decay. 17. 18. 19. Stick aroud for Part Two!
  7. The Xmas holidays made for some free time and the opportunity for me to explore. So I arranged a whole day out with my buddys and Storm LSF who was coming out with us for the 1st time.. So the Alarm goes of at 2:30am and I check the phone and 2 of the party have become lightweights We arrive at the south coast at 7am and its not good from the start. Fail, fail, and busted by a rather nice security guard. So it is onto our last stop of the day as it is now the afternoon and decided we would try this... With it being busy near the front doors we decided to head round the back and tackle the muddy and waterlogged fields and get in that way..... Once we had squeezed in (due to too much xmas choc I guess) it was time to grab a load of photos and then make a quick exit and get home for more xmas Choccys. And then as we are walking away we hear some shouting from the other side of the water from some folk, could not work out if it was get out of there or how did you get in lol, but we just stomped of into the sunset and headed home History Pinched from kkj The Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded c.1933 to exploit a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay to the south of the Surrey village of Capel. Although the outbreak of war in 1939 brought some demand for bricks to help with the war effort, there was apparently little need for the high-grade hollow ceramic blocks which were Clockhouse's main product and conscription meant that there was also a severe shortage of labour. By 1941, the Company was in liquidation and sold the majority of its share capital to the London Brick Company (LBC) to avoid closing the works. In 1945, the Company was wound up for good and the works were acquired by the LBC. Under LBC, production was substantially increased, aided by the 1950s housing boom and in the 1960s the works was rebuilt to cope with ever increasing demand. The global financial crisis of 2008 hit the building materials industry hard: a sudden slump in housing prices meant that house-building ground almost to a halt and demand for bricks plummeted. In March 2009, a 'phased closure programme' which began later that month and led to the loss of 61 jobs with indication that there was no intention to re-activate the brickworks or extract clay from the adjacent pits. Since closure, Clockhouse Brickworks has been in limbo, slowly being stripped of anything valuable while a lengthy audit determines the planning conditions surrounding re-use of the site. Plans for an incinerator ('energy from waste facility') on the site, bitterly opposed by local residents, were thrown out by a High Court Judgment in 2009 and the future of the site is now uncertain. 1 2 3 4 5 6 :pThis is what I wanted to see here 7 35mm 8 85mm 9 17mm 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And a few random pics from some place we got busted at during the day. Apparently we set of a PIR/alarm as we walked in 1 2
  8. A beautiful chateau tucked away in the French countryside... Luckily we got to see it just before it was horribly trashed! ...CHATEAU FACHOS... Thanks for lookin' in...
  9. Every so often you come across something unseen from forums or even the internet before, an considering I love exploring old houses this one I could not pass up on again, I first noticed this place a few months ago driving past it then a few weeks ago the other half remembered about it, as I had long forgotten so we decided to pay a visit upon route to another house. Not much room inside as all rooms where packed full of stuff the small house itself had been turned upside down either by looters or kids, but either way the good stuff remained, an old gasmask with box was outside under some bits and buckets, inside a beautiful piano sits hardly untouched, while you looked around you soon noticed alot more than what you first would upon entering. As i said hardly any full room shots, but hopefully what I have is enough to show an insight into this place. (address an so fourth been edited). Enjoy Thank you for looking
  10. Opening in May 1939, Royal Air Force West Raynham was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War. RAF West Raynham was an expansion scheme airfield with a grass landing strip and a Fort-type lookout tower. The lookout tower was replaced with a “Control Tower for Very Heavy Bomber Stations†later in the war. The headquarters and accommodation blocks were built to the west of the landing area and bomb stores to the south-east. In 1943 two concrete runways were built to replace the grass landing strip. One runway was 1.8km and the other 1.3km in length. The housing on the base was also expanded at the same time, providing accommodation for 2,456 men and 658 women. The station had a Rapier missile training dome, in which a 180 degree simulation could be projected onto the inside of the dome to simulate flight in a fighter jet. Many of the facilities were similar to those provided by the stations sister base RAF Kirton in Lindsey in Lincolnshire, including the training dome. The station closed in 1994 but was retained as a strategic resrve. The site laid derelict until the RAF decided it was surplus to requirements in 2006 and was sold to developers in 2007. Part of the site has been used as a new housing estate, and the land around the main runway is now a solar farm. The Airmen's Restaurant Officers Mess Station HQ Accommodation Blocks Medical Block Sports Hall Control Tower Hangers and Rapier Dome The hangers are now in use by private businesses so we didn't go inside them. Water Tower
  11. Not my usual way to spend 30mins or so, but the place seemed curious when passing, so popping inside finding odd trinkets and going up the stairs, it soon began to feel like it could cave in, inside is all light painted which showed a wall mural, (minus light through doors/ceiling) outside a wonderful RV its up for sale so anyone wanting a splore vehicle this is right up the alley even has on-board camera No other information on this one sadly but not bad for what it is. Thanks for looking
  12. Sweet day out in Wales today Visited with Raz & FatPanda Bit of History; Holywell Union workhouse was erected in 1838-40 at the south of Holywell and was designed by John Welch. The Poor Law Commissioners authorised an expenditure of £6,200 on its construction which was to accommodate 400 inmates. The workhouse design followed the popular cruciform or "square" layout with separate accommodation wings for the different classes of inmate (male/female, infirm/able-bodied etc.) radiating from a central hub. To the rear, a central three-storey range connected to the central supervisory hub who observation windows gave a clear view over all the inmates yards. The main accommodation blocks ran north and south and had cross-wings at each end. In 1930, the workhouse passed into local council control and became a Public Assistance Institution. In 1948, the former workhouse became part of the National Health Services as Lluesty General Hospital. In the final years Lluesty was used to provide geriatric care up until its closure in 2008 when the towns new community hospital opened. In Febuary 2011 it was sold to developers for £275.000. The site is allocated for a development of 70 houses but as the original work houses and chapel are grade II listed, they cannot be demolished. The Explore; Easy 9am start after 2 hours sleep still a little bit pissed we set off for a day in Wales. Enroute to our first location we stumbled across an old hospital, eager to find a somewhat original derp that maybe resembled Denbigh's little brother we clambered over the fence into what looks like the court yard of a prison (and after looking into it, it transpires that it was once used as one ) and the first thing we come across is needles. Lots of them. Now this is normally enough to make me think "hmmm do i really want to be here?" but not today, today i was going to be careful and push on. It turned out to be a rather photogenic little spot! Ruined, but pleasing to the eye. However after aprox 1 hour we decided it was time to make tracks and continue our adventure in Wales. Heres a few more photos; And a couple of funky blue boilers to finish... If you got this far, cheers for looking
  13. Most people know about this place and have seen it pop up almost everywhere this year, I may be hated for this but it just did not do nothing for me this place, I only liked the ceilings mainly, the best part for me was basically being a ninja an walking around trying not to make noise at silly o clock in the morning, I guess once you have seen the pictures of this place online, you've basically been, im sure my photos wont show anything different than anyone else's either but someone might enjoy them I have to also say watching secca sleep and the dogs staring up at me as I stood looking at them from the windows was rather fun, I was expecting them to bark and wake secca up, but alas nothing not even a whimper... shocking. IMGP2706 IMGP2704 IMGP2699 IMGP2696 IMGP2694 IMGP2691 IMGP2685 IMGP2684 IMGP2680 IMGP2678 IMGP2667 IMGP2670 IMGP2664 IMGP2663 IMGP2660 IMGP2657 IMGP2648 IMGP2643 IMGP2653 Thanks for looking as always
  14. This was another of those fab days out, Just driving around and checking out stuff I had been wanting to see for a while that had popped up online. So myself Zyge, littlebear and Spark headed out for the day to avoid massive nettles and horsefly bites..... Something that I did not manage all to well 1st stop was a area called Hillbilly farm, this was linked to RAF Fersfield and the land incorporates some of the old nissen huts and a few other out buildings as well. Inside some of these buildings you will see there are all sorts of vehicles and other bits of junk, most of what nature has now reclaimed. There is not a lot of history on the farm itself other than the farmer did not want to sell it off as he was worried about being ripped of, how true this is I am not sure, but the airfield history I feel is important as most of what there is to see incorporates the building that are there. The runway is now gone as are all airfield building that we looked for, but you can still drive around the taxi way if you wish Built in 1943/1944, the airfield was originally a satellite of RAF Knettishall. It was constructed to Class A bomber specifications, with a main 6,000 ft (1,800 m) runway (08/26), and two secondary runways (02/20, 14/32) of 4,200 ft (1,300 m). Accommodation for about 2,000 personnel were in Nissen huts along with an operations block and two T-2 hangars. The facility was originally named Winfarthing when it was allocated to the United States Army Air Forces in 1942. Assigned to the VIII Bomber Command, it was renamed Fersfield when used by the Americans. Winfarthing was assigned USAAF station number 140; Fersfield was reassigned 554. Not used by the USAAF, it was transferred to the United States Navy for operational use. The airfield is most notable as the operational airfield for Operation Aphrodite, a secret plan for remote controlled Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers (redesignated as BQ-7s) to be used against German V-1 flying bomb sites, submarine pens, or deep fortifications that had resisted conventional bombing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  15. Thank you for watching my photos! If you want to see more of my work please visit and like my page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Colourbex/834327016579594?sk=timeline
  16. The history of Robert Fletcher & sons paper mill dates back to the industrial revolution. The company was once owned by Ralph Crompton and Nephews, producers and bleachers of paper. Their first mill was located in Stoneclough, Manchester. The death of the Crompton brothers left the mill ownerless and the succession was offered to Robert Fletcher, the mill’s manager at the time. Fletcher had risen through the ranks, to first become the manager of the bleaching department and later the whole mill. Following Fletcher’s death on 17th May 1865, his sons John and James took over. They in turn passed down the mill to their sons, also named John and James. In 1897 the mill was incorporated as a limited company. In 1921 a second mill opened, located at Greenfield, near Oldham. The mill specialised in the production of cigarette paper and at its height employed 1000 people to run seven paper machines. These machines produced only a fraction of the paper the later, much larger machines could produce. Upon closure the mill had three machines – two very similar lines from 19XX and a huge modern 1996 addition. By 1986 the company was making a loss and was purchased by the Melton Medes Conglomerate who turned the company around and started to make a profit once again. However by 2001 the company was once again failing and the decision was made to close the Stoneclough Mill. Some people were transferred to the Greenfield mill, but the company could not sustain the increasing loses and was forced into receivership. The mill was closed down overnight. The mill at Stoneclough has been demolished. To this day the mill at Greenfield still remains how it was the day it closed. Streams of paper remain inside the machines, connected to the rolls of finished product at the end of the production lines – a time capsule from a bygone era. Wood Pulp Treatment and Preparation Paper starts off as wood bails which is turned into a pulp using machines, then bleached. The rolling machines The rolling machines form the pulp into sheets. Spooling Machines and Packing Area The sheets are fed onto reels and cut to size Offices and Staff Areas Newer Machine Room This huge machine was a later addition an is much more modern than the rest of the machinery.
  17. Want to see more? Visit and like my fb page colourbex to stay updated https://www.facebook.com/pages/Colourbex/834327016579594?fref=ts
  18. Poland The Laboratory - 2015

    ‘But it was just a part of the story…’ This story starts in the point where the last one (http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9412-The-Library-and-Forbidden-Archive-July-2015) ended … more or less. It is again the same winter Sunday or Saturday … (don’t remember now maybe it was the 7th or 8th of February 2015 - the photos come from much wider range of time), the day when we reached that location for the first time. It is the day in which we reached the top floor of the building and we discovered the library, reading room, project/drawing rooms and archive. But now … there was something more. We are standing on a dark corridor (me and my two friends). Standing in front of a door. It seemed that this door led to another part of the building. From satellite pictures we could guess that we were just in ½ of the length of the building. There had to be another part of the corridor behind the door and some other unexplored room. After what we saw already we had to get in. The door was two sided, wooden, quite massive. On the left side there used to be a window with an windowsill. Now the window was sealed with a massive plank attached by nine or ten inch nails. There was no door handle on the door (someone just removed the old one). It was quite obvious that someone wanted to sell-off that part with a lot of effort. We could also notice that the lock in the door was closed from inside and the keyhole (of quite modern lock was damaged). At some point we wanted to give up, At that point it took us almost an hour to find a way to enter. The door was wooden but because of all the moisture the wood on the outside was soft. After some time we could see the deadbolt. Luckly the lock was old, the deadbolt was not locked in a fixed position and we could move it back. Than we used that door handle I found, located its bolt in the hole. This allowed us to move the latch bolt back. Now we needed just a bit of leaver to move the door. Because of all the moisture it was just a bit of stuck. Maybe after more than an hour we could get inside. It was something we couldn’t except from outside. Something we were not anticipating to see in such building. There was a scent. Chemical, unpleasant scent. We were entering a long abandoned laboratory. What we discovered was a set of different rooms connected with one corridor. On the left there was a small social room. Items scattered around here and there. It all looked as if no one moved it from long time. Everything just as if left in a hurry. Back to the main hall. A door on the right. A small board with a sign ‘Angle measurement’ I remember Iv entered a quite big room. First what I noticed just made my feet soft. All this equipment, wasted, rusting, forgotten. How much of state money had to be here in this building … A meeting room by which we I could enter another room (here visible on the left). Inside different measuring tools. Everything just as left a decade ago. Ducktape, stamples, rubber stamp, pens, typing machines, phones …. There was also a lot of different documents, furniture, wet, now a bit rotting. All the tools covered with rust. But of course what was most important (for us) everything was not moved here since the workers abandoned this place. There was no dust holes, no footprints. No signs of activity of any visitors. Just the sign of time. And as in the library/archive/reading room because it was the last floor we could see that there was water dripping through the ceiling. Someone tried to place some kind of containers for water but without maintenance … But until then we didn’t found the source of that chemical scent. We had to go a bit deep in to the unknown. Next door on our right. The scent became almost unbearable. Now we started to get to the source. First a chemical storage room. Water dripping through the ceiling, chemical moist in the air. Some of the older containers broken with their insiders on the floor. As a graduate of biotech I decided that there is not much health risk and that we can proceed. We found a fool scale chemical laboratory Chemical glasses still on the benches, full with different content. Acid that was mixing with the air made its job allowing everything to corrode even faster. What was mostly stunning is that if any one of use moved an object we could already see it. A white patch, free of dust. It had to be a decade since no one visited this place. Everything as if the time had stopped. Objects, equipment waiting to be sued again … What made me almost cry are those high sensitive scales that had to be really expensive at some time. We were able to find a lot of things there. Old documents, photos of workers, undeveloped films. Some of those things could be saved. And again there were some many details. So many things that just standing there made my head hurt. I remember that when I came that day back to home I was totally exhausted. The amount of frames, details that this location had to offer was mind blowing. At that point we decided not to publish any photos. We wanted to gather as much material from this place as possible. We wanted to record it, film it in the state we discovered it that day. It was a long and hard work … And now … This is a taste a things to come https://vimeo.com/124396935 When it’s done .. you will know As the last time more photos can be seen in following albums: https://www.flickr.com/photos/126529380@N08/sets/72157651170444730 https://www.flickr.com/photos/126529380@N08/sets/72157649023177383
  19. (it will be my first ... so lets make it with quality) The archive and forgotten library It was a cold winter day. Because of the short day I decided to meet with my friends and explore some local industrial zone. We were vising it since few weeks already. Building after building. Because the place was guarded (it still is) we were not in the hurry. Sometimes entering different buildings took us some time because the entrance was not that obvious. Once in we had a lot of time to document what we will find. Little that we know what awaited us that day particular day. In some way we were not expecting anything interesting. We already knew that most of the buildings are just pure industrial/production halls. That day we decided to enter one inconspicuous three floored building. Since it was quite close to the guards office we didn’t wanted to risk. With all caution we tried to find some entrance to that building. Nothing. With all the desperation we tried the windows. At some point one window at the height of 2 meters gave in (we didn’t brake it, it just opened). We entered the building. Usually when you are inside you are safe from the guards but since we didn’t know what expect we were still careful. First we found a view that was just expected. Raw, industrial. A corridor that opened to a small hall and some workshops. Since the building was three floored we wanted to see what is upstairs. We found a staircase and started to climb the stairs. From old stained by dust windows we could see guards patrolling the area. Soo lucky we were inside. After we reached the top floor we noticed that the place looks like there was no one since a long time. Dust, no foot prints, a grating door closed by a rusty padlock. Since it was the top floor we could see that the water was leaking through the ceiling. Now we noticed that not just the padlock is rusty but the grating itself also. With just a bit of force it gave in … giving us just enough space to enter. Another corridor and then … room after room we noticed where we are. First what I have noticed was a reading room. Desks and chairs not moved since long time. No footprints. Just next to it a library. Books wet with water dripping through the ceiling. I could notice that someone tried to save those books by covering the bookshelves with some kind of foil. The efforts went in vein. Books covered with fungi, wet, decaying. Moving on to another rooms we noticed that its not just the library and the reading room here. First empty rooms filled with decaying documents Someone tried to stock them up, maybe to move them away/save them. In the end they just started to rot. Moving on we discovered what were those documents and where did they came from. The library and reading room were attached to project rooms. Once fantastic now … At the end of the corridor we found an archive. A place where all those documents were stored in the most proper way. There were two type of archive rooms. One old archive with old wooden furniture. Containing different plans and graphs, projects of the things produced in the industrial zone. There was also more modern part of the archive. This time more steel/aluminum In the end we were vising this single location for almost 2 months. Every Sunday or Saturday checking all the details, gathering photographic material. Unfortunately such places can’t be a secret forever. Since the moment other local explorers found it location it started to decay even faster. More (best photos selected) from this location can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/126529380@N08/sets/72157650551638208/with/16993743615/ … and if you want you can also check my fb … https://www.facebook.com/HDReverywhere
  20. Want to see more of my work? Like my page Colourbex and stay updated https://www.facebook.com/pages/Colourbex/834327016579594?ref=ts&fref=ts
  21. Want to see more? Like my page Colourbex and stay updated! https://www.facebook.com/pages/Colourbex/834327016579594?ref=ts&fref=ts
  22. Belgium Abandoned Hospital 2015

    Want to see more? Like my FB page Colourbex and stay updated https://www.facebook.com/pages/Colourbex/834327016579594?fref=ts
  23. Day 2 of the 'Tour Di Bastardi' and after ramming some croissants, coffee and that pre packed dry bread/toast stuff down our necks, Darbians, Masa and myself kicked off proceedings with a MASSIVE want of mine... Cant think of any better way of spending a glorious Italian summers morning than wandering around a sprawling, dusty, rotten hospital site... Rather picture heavy but hey... I don't care! ... As always, thankyou please for looking
  24. Manicomio di R is an abandoned asylum in Italy. Built in 1871 the hospital was a transformation of other buildings that were originally a hospital of charitable institutions, and later a military college. The hospital was used to treat the mentally ill, and electroshock therapy was used extensively here, along with experimental operations on the nervous system. Facilities included a laboratory of clinical research, one of pathology, one radiology, one of electrotherapy and an operating room for intervention to the nervous system. The asylum closed down in the early 1980s and has been abandoned ever since. Very little damage has been caused, so natural decay has been allowed to work its magic on the old corridors and rooms resulting in a pleasant glimpse of the Italian past. Our Visit This place went straight to the top of my list of favourite asylums in the world! Unassuming from the outside, the building has so much to offer inside. The huge corridors with tall windows are so bright and airy, and the building has a lovely feel to it. Add the old fashioned operating theatre and x-ray machines, chapel and left over items into the mix to achieve urbex heaven! We arrived here quite late in the day and didn’t have long before the light faded, I could have happily spent all day here. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Want more? View the full set from here on my website - Behind Closed Doors
  25. So here is a place I did last year, an recently went back to find most of the original items missing anyway best not to dwell on the past an focus on the present. This place was rotten, you could not find a worse place to venture inside, with dry dog Sh!T everywhere, an huge spiders and sacks of babies hanging from ceiling (more spiders) this place even makes my skin feel weird now. When I first stepped foot inside, the smell an rot of the place was very overpowering, but document I must and soon I did not become aware of any of the surroundings an focused on the photos. Id say judging by letters tucked on cabinets it had been abandoned 10/11 years, the last owner was (female) judging by the clothes that was left, an it seemed she lived in one bedroom, bottles of water tucked in cabinets and draws while she remotely hide herself away, did i mention she had possibly 13/14 dogs alive in the house as she sheltered from the outside world? With the woman never leaving the dogs was forced to eat what they could... then each other. (Dog bones present in places). Unsure how even in todays world this could happen, unsure if the woman died here or simply vanished eventually leaving behind every sentimental piece of her past behind, but judging by the place she died here, spoke to the locals the place has been put on the market but with a new road coming in, they want to knock this place down an move the others living nearby. Here is my photos, sorry if there is many, first shots are of a recent visit (B/W) which was not visible or found at start. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Thanks everyone for sticking with this, hopefully ive documented this place well enough
×