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Found 41 results

  1. Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and Gina on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  2. Woolley Hall The history Woolley Hall is a landscape park largely unchanged since 1800. The park is associated with a Jacobean Hall (dated to around 1635 with later alterations). Features include wooded pleasure grounds, a ha-ha, kitchen garden and ponds. The main house is Grade II listed and the courtyard is Grade II listed as being of Special Architectural and Historic Interest. Michael Wentworth began rebuilding Woolley Hall in 1635. The new Woolley Hall consisted of an 'H'-shaped building of moderate size. An east wing was added to the south front around 1680. The western wing was added during the mid eighteenth century. The eastern wings which form the rest of the present building were added in the early nineteenth century. The house is constructed of hammer-dressed sandstone, with a slate roof. There are four storeys including the attic and basement. Recently Woolley Hall went up for sale (2014) with a guide price of £3m from its owners, Wakefield Council. It was purchased in 2015 by new owners Commercial Development Projects (CDP). Plans were submitted (2016) for a hotel conversion for the Grade II listed building. (CDP) had put forward a proposal to create a 88-bedroom hotel, with function facilities to cater for 300 guests, spa treatment rooms and a gastro restaurant. But (CDP), sent an email to the council (2017) to say they have withdrawn the plans, but gave no explanation. In reaction to the withdrawal, assistant chief executive for resources and governance at Wakefield Council, Michael Clements said: “Wakefield Council agreed to sell Woolley Hall to a local developer last year. “The sale was conditional upon them developing the site into a boutique hotel. “Disappointingly, this deal has now fallen through. It is thought the proceeds would be used to re-invest council capital with a spoke person stating “The proceeds from the sale will be used to support the council’s capital investment plans across the district whilst it will also provide an annual budget saving to help us deal with the funding cuts imposed on us by the Government.” The explore The hall sits in pleasant surroundings and considering its recent endeavour has a boutique hotel it looks like efforts are been made to keep the hall well maintained. so... during a very windy February morning we moved in for a closer look. It was a little difficult to know where to start with this one as there were quite a few different access routes to the hall... Not knowing if we would be met by a security team we started documenting the building from a far whilst slowly moving in. The hall is quite something and reminded us of one of those old hammer house movies... albeit without Dracula. Moving slowly to the east side of the hall we came across what looked like an old boiler house... although four boilers remained only one was operational... perhaps part of the councils money saving scheme. Making our way though we entered the main hall.. Surprisingly most of the rooms original architecture is preserved with some rather exquisite flooring and panelling. although some of the rooms were accessible most of the doors were bolted and without wrecking what looked like a very well preserved old door we decided to document what we could and move on. Although the main hall was the main attraction we decided to explore some of the stable blocks to the north of the hall... It looks like this was used by council departments including Wakefield social services among others. Largely empty with left overs from its office days with little else on offer. There was some very unusual looking housing quarters although we could not find any entry to these building. On leaving the stable blocks we were met by a very pleasant care taker who gave us a little history whilst politely telling us to f*uck off... The pics The main hall The stable block The boiler house oh well time for a game of golf... LBE
  3. This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  4. Yep, it's another Italian asylum! Last one from this trip. We changed our plans at the last minute to check on this instead of visiting one of the better known spots. It was a bit of a gamble as we had no info and it was going to be the last explore of the trip, but it could be epic. I'm glad we did as it turned out to be a banger. Something interesting in every room and corridor pretty much. Lights still on in places and parts that looked not long abandoned. Probably the closest thing I've seen to one of the classic UK asylums in their hey day. We only had time to get around half of it unfortunately so I'm sure there is a lot more to see in here. Visited with elliot5200 & @shaddam Freaky bastard door, like something out of a horror film creaking and banging of it's own accord. Never heard anything like it. The first of many in here. Lights still on in some parts This semi-circular section was a secure wing for violent patients. Inside one of the cells and the adjacent corridor We popped our heads into the chapel just before we left as it was a bit bait. Very nice in there but it looked very much still in use so we didn't hang about. And that's all for now. Thanks for looking
  5. This had been on my to-do list for some time having seen previous reports. I suppose for that reason it was more of a pilgrimage than an explore but well enjoyable nonetheless. We made a right meal of getting in here but it was necessary with the amount of activity near where we wanted to be. Not to mention the security chickens and sheep announcing our presence to all and sundry. The snow didn't help either, making sure we had no choice but to 'leave only footprints' from one end of the site to the other. Anyway, nobody came looking for us luckily and what a belter of a place. The main building is not only stunning but has some intact operating rooms full of equipment. I could have spent all day in there and I'll most likely pop back if ever in the area again as I'm told there is a morgue somewhere. We did try a few other buildings but they were mostly bricked up and the ones we got into didn't have much inside. A fruitful trip with elliot5200 and @shaddam Built in 1871, the site began as a charity hospital. It then became a military training college before turning into a psychiatric hospital. It was commonly referred to as "the factory of ideas" by locals. About 500 people worked there as doctors, clerks, nurses, and maintenance staff. It's busiest period of admissions came during WWII where the number of patients never fell below 1,000. The total number of patients reached it's peak of 1,400 in the 1960s. It was closed in 1981 when Basaglia law came into force. This was the act which signified a large reform of the psychiatric system in Italy. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. One of the other buildings with little inside 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Not a baaaaad explore at all Thanks for looking
  6. This was a fun one. A small part of the hospital is still in use so there were lots of vehicles coming and going. Security kept driving up and down the main road as well like it was groundhog day so we had to stay on our toes. The hospital was built in 1930 for the treatment of people suffering from mental illness. Towards the end of WWII, in 1945, a famous massacre took place here. Seventy five Italian Social Republic soldiers were brought here as prisoners and around 50 of them were brutally executed. Some of them being tied up with wire and crushed under the wheels of two trucks. Anyway, as I was saying, a fun place to hang out, with something to see in most of the buildings. I'd say we got around 75% of the abandoned stuff. Here's some pics: 1. Chapel 2. Not too impressive inside 3. 4. & 5. 6. Beds bolted to the floor 7. 8. 9. Not entirely sure what this was, some kind of meals on wheels type body trolley? 10. 11. Several buildings full of old documents 12. 13. 14. X-ray scans 15. Theatre/Cinema 16. Amazingly the projector has survived Thanks for looking
  7. Hey, guys, this is a video from my recent exploration of Manchester's Victoria Arches. Unfortunately, we were caught entering and as I couldn't resist taking a peak I went it alone. However, we will be back to make a proper video report on the place. I was absolutely gutted to not get a proper vid but the footage I did get was half decent and worth it for the experience alone. This place holds so many memories and it is astonishing to wonder whats under our feet.
  8. The Station Hotel is a grand Victorian building situated in the heart of Ayr town centre. The hotel consists of 71 bedrooms, complete with en-suite bathrooms, plus a host of suits for functions and a cocktail lounge. The hotel, which is attached to Ayr railway station, was originally opened by the Glasgow and South Western Railway in June 1866 and become part of the British Transport Hotels (BTH) at Nationalisation. It was sold by BTH in October 1951 and has changed ownership a number of times, having been owned by Stakis Hotels, Quality, and Swallow Hotels. The Station Hotel is currently the oldest and most famous hotel in Ayr. The hotel has retained almost all of its original features inside and out. The hotel started to turn away customers in 2014 and closed around 2015. After suffering neglect for some time beforehand, the building is now deteriorating; the railway station have had to take action to safeguard their customers from falling debris. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The car park is fenced off due to parts of the exterior falling off Entrance and staircase Reception Lift and staircase on the first floor Into the cocktail lounge.... The corridor leading to the next parts was suffering decay due to leaks in the roof The Arran Suite... Restaurant... The restaurant's kitchen Other public spaces around the hotel... The Kyle Suite bar area The Carrick Room The Kintyre Suite And finally, the hotel rooms... View of the decaying rear facade overlooking the railway station
  9. Dobroyd mill The history Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use. The explore The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill. The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too. The pics
  10. Explore This was a fairly easy explore as these buildings are not as protected as the main college and the park relies on tourists to inform security about any vandals. The gymnasium was the hardest to get into as we had to avoid getting seen by any onlookers. So going at a later time of day would be advised. You should be cautious if you get further into the student centre as some of the doors looked to be alarmed. The classrooms are in the open and not surrounded by anything so you are likely to be spotted by security or tourists. We had a run in with security who were quite well mannered and laid back. All they said was that we were not to go near the building as it is a demolition site. Explored with @little_boy_explores History Student Centre I can't believe they left this in the open Gymnasium We didn't need to this door Classrooms
  11. Grand casino history Located in the Sefton district of Southport at the corner of Lord Street and Court Street. Originally built in 1923 as a garage and car showroom, it was converted into a luxury cinema in 1938 by architect George E. Tonge. The Grand Cinema opened on 14th November 1938 with Arthur Tracy in "Follow Your Star". The cinema was designed for and operated by an independent operator throughout its cinematic life. Seating was provided in a stadium plan with a sloping floor at the front (known as the Pit stalls and stepped floor at the rear which was known as the Royal stalls and Grand stalls. An unusual feature was the provision of a balconette which was attached to each sidewall. Seating was provised in pairs all along towards the proscenium. There were decorative grilles each side of the proscenium opening which contained the organ pipes of the Compton 3Manual organ which had an illuminated console on a lift, in the centre of the orchestra pit. The organ was opened by Herbert A. Dowson. In the ceiling was a large shallow dowm which had a central Art Deco style light fixture. There was a cafe provided for patrons. In 1963 the Compton organ was removed to Cheetham Hill Methodist Church in Manchester, which in later years was moved to Chorley Town Hall. In 1966 another Compton organ was installed at the Grand Cinema which had previously been housed in the Regal Cinema, Douglas, Isle of Man and this was opened by Charles Smart. The Grand Cinema closed on 2nd July 1966 with Sean Connery in "Thunderball" and Peter Cushing in "Hound of the Baskervilles". It was converted into an independent bingo club, and the Compton organ was played to bingo players at the interval during the first few years. The Grand Cinema last operated as the Stanley Grand Casino, and from 2007 became the Mint Casino, but this was closed by May 2016 and the building is boarded up in early-2017. It is a Grade II listed building. Visited with @albinojay and @GK_WAX a nice easy no bother place this one to trouble or drama. With nice easy local parking. The place is a bit of a death trap with soggy weetabix floors. But enjoyed it was met there by another couple lads @cloth head @scrappy and another lad who's name I didn't get.nice to meet you all. This has been around a while but hasn't had much foot traffic previous post have been in non public so I'll post here. Move if appropriate thanks. AE3A3F7D-13D6-46A2-BBAC-531556536576 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 677196FF-ED07-414A-9EB3-16F7F1686508 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A4BEE354-17D4-43C3-B29B-E949AD22EA21 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 521170FE-A826-4E2B-AE07-F90EB2A17446 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 41F04130-2574-41F5-BAD8-C6637C8C1DBA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C5221223-E490-4DDB-9B64-EB5D1A80F0A0 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A24A62DC-B8F2-4029-A979-D553F1A5F329 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 97FA0434-1D1C-44A2-96E0-89E2C6D61EC6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 352BF5D7-B9D9-4E71-861F-CA6B8AADC650 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 95CC590A-7E8B-4876-A259-F6DCD85E1E93 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5857917C-0368-421B-AF97-4E56B351376E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F8D01375-12B7-4DD2-AF23-E36E812755EA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr CD2C385D-4775-4085-BCAC-E9347EE31B4E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 97ABFA19-6F4F-488A-9F00-9636FFF07634 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/GcMZPQ][/url]ADBDC4A5-0609-4DF9-9D88-135775D61C59 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B34CB251-D300-48EA-B24C-14806915C219 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 78899088-C91D-41E8-ADBE-8B4D02F6E0E6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/23fMZKj][/url]7C7E01B6-72B6-4394-A664-A2188F5B5DBB by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 48BCACC7-F497-4402-911D-BC6A68F8C329 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 10E00DAC-5129-442C-A055-D8E8E6A46B37 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A57EDCE2-17AF-4066-AEBF-742B3DFB10C6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9419402C-5E4F-45DA-BF5D-5706D72749B3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6ACB5984-5895-43ED-82E3-132DE586AC2F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 324F8383-0F17-4D00-AB82-60CE78F340C2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr FF2CBFFB-2962-498A-BEE4-2DE4AB3EB6D8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0FF552D4-1564-48DE-8E48-EFA706588646 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  12. Kastix Ltd History Built in 1947 as the new drill hall for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion West Riding Regiment. Later used as the offices for Kastix, a textile company producing womenswear and children's clothing, which went in to receivership in 2001 with the loss of more than 50 jobs. Conversion plans There are currently plans to demolish the site to construct an Aldi supermarket. The exterior Bit out of the way... but was in the area so decided to take a look. Its a fair size and considering it's had no owners since 2001 the condition of the place is pretty decent. Stopping at the top of the road and checking for hostiles we decided to take a closer look. Theres lots of works adjacent and we attracted quite a few spectators as we scrambled through the fencing... moving in we could see there were a few CCTV cameras, rusty and outdated these were perhaps part of the security measures when the building was last working. Starting at the front and working our way to the back (drawn quite a crowd at this point) we were intrigued to find an entry point. The exterior is fitting with the period and will be a shame when the building is demolished to make way for the plastic prefabs that are ALDI. Most of the windows and doors are original but it looks like efforts were made to modernise the building at some point. Scaling the roof... checking for open doors windows (bingo).. we were in. The interior Making our way through a small room and then into a much larger hall we were a little taken back by the size of the building... Strewn garments, hangers and palettes of junk made us a little unsettled and it was almost like a worker was about to appear and escort us off the premises (or maybe try sell us some clothing). Making our way past the left overs we headed to the doors littered across the back of the building. slowly working through the rooms we came to the main stairwell... making our way to the upper floors...we made our way through the many offices, empty and miscellaneous rooms ending in an area with some pretty creepy looking changing rooms. Overall theres a few cool bits and in our opinion its worth documenting if not for the very creepy mannequins, the overall condition or the asthetics the sheer amount of stuff left over from previous occupiers. There also an attic area which was a little difficult to reach but it did look like someone had gone to the effort to investigate. That concludes the explore...
  13. Nipped in here after G.B's last February. Not much to see building wise but there is some nice graffiti knocking about. I have seen some more recent reports and the graffiti has changed in parts now. Some for the better some not. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Sheffield Tramway was an extensive tramway network serving the English city of Sheffield and its suburbs. The first tramway line, horse-drawn, opened in 1873 between Lady's Bridge and Attercliffe, subsequently extended to Brightside and Tinsley. Routes were built to Heeley, where a tram depot was built,Nether Edge and Hillsborough. In 1899, the first electric tram ran between Nether Edge and Tinsley. By 1902 all the routes were electrified. By 1910 the network covered 39 miles, by 1951 48 miles. The last trams ran between Leopold Street to Beauchief and Tinsley on 8 October 1960—three Sheffield trams were subsequently preserved at the National Tramway Museum in Crich. . . . . This one was outside Cannons Brewery on the same day. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680624533806/with/33051734346/
  14. One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  15. This location is the one where you quickly hear the stories about: impossible, the mount everest of the urbex, don't even try ... But sometmes this steel giant likes some company over too and there were rumours of a slight chance to get in. The date was set already and actually something else was on the program but when one fellow exploer had heard that there were loopholes in the net of the impenetrable hell gate (read: fences, 3 rows of nato wire and another 200V power wire as icing on the cake) we wanted to attempt. The hell gate was only a smaller obstacle, because once you pass you are on the playground of little demons in white vans that approach almost without any sound, or with a shepherd dog at their side. With all of the above in mind, I had a very turbulent night's sleep 3 nights in advance. In the end, the steel gods favoured us that day, which enabled me to enjoy this beautiful exploration. Very briefly it became exciting when there were 5 people in the building with helmets and hi-visability jackets. After some back-and-forth texting with my mates, and some cat and mouse tricks to avoid thm, I first hid in a closet and then rushed me to the top where the rest of our team was. Once there, I crossed the 5 fluos ... 5 eyes on me, 2 of them with open mouth. A French voice 'mais, elle est ici tout seule?' 'vous n'avez pas peur'? It turned out to be just the most flashy explorers you can imagine, not to mention the decibels they produced. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  16. Just noticed a lot of topics posted lately on this location but hey ho here is mine. The Church of our Saviour Visited with: Alex & Klare Visit date: February 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. History The church was consecrated on the 23rd of January 1865 and held its final service in October 2007. The build cost was £8,000 for the church & the nearby school and vicarage. The church was built in the Early Pointed Gothic style with polished red granite pillars & seating was supplied for around 1,000 people. The church spire located on the north side stands at around 150 ft in height. There is also a small baptism pool that is sunk into the floor and was covered by an ornamental grate and the carpet when not in use. Since it's closure in October 2007 repairs to the roof have been made on several occasions which has helped to keep the church in a good condition, however, the future of the church is still uncertain at this time and decay is slowly setting in. My Visit To say I was looking forward to visiting here would have been an understatement, I was excited! This was the first church that I explored and I knew it was going to be one to remember. As we were walking up to the church I was just hoping we would be get to see the beauty inside, however, I should not have worried as we just walked straight in! We headed straight up the stairs to the balcony area and I just stood there with what must have been a huge smile on my face looking at the beauty in front of me. If there is one thing I love about churches it is the architecture & the craftsmanship that goes into creating these beautiful buildings. After a few minutes of taking in the beauty we started to unpack our camera gear and set about doing what we love. Then, we noticed that the carpet at the top of the church was pulled back to reveal the baptism pool so, myself and Alex decided to go and cover it back over to make for nicer photos. We told Klare to be careful as not to step on it and fall down as the last thing we need is anyone getting hurt. My first photo was taken from the balcony looking into the church. Then all I have to do to find another opportunity for a photo is turn around! After taking the above photos I headed down the stairs to grab some ground floor shots. As you come down the stairs you have to go through a small kitchen and then you emerge into the main foyer. I loved the windows in this area so I snapped a quick photo before heading into the ground floor of the church. The doors on the left of the photo above lead to the kitchen that you walk through as I mentioned earlier and the doors to the right take you to the main doors of the church. It was very dark in said room but nonetheless I tried to grab a photo, here is the result. So after the foyer it was time to head into the main church, here is the view you see as you walk through the wood and glass dividing wall. I also decided to take another photo with the camera looking up slightly to get a little more of the wood ceiling in the photo. And for good measure I moved forward a little and grabbed a third shot. Before heading towards the front of the church I did as before, I turned around and there was another photo waiting for me! This is looking back towards the balcony where I took the first photo from. So time to head to the front of the church to take a look at the stained glass. I love a nice bit of stained glass and this church is full of it! I know all churches have stained glass but in the derelict churches we get to visit it is rare to see it in such good shape. Also in this area you will find the organ which has seen better days that's for sure. Now, as has happened many times today all I have to do is turn around for another beautiful view to appear, this has to be one of, if not, my favourite photo from the day, just look at that ceiling! As I was walking down the middle aisle towards the front I noticed the Baptism font on my right hand side and made a mental note to go and grab a photo, now trust me when I say that is not a good idea for me to do that because on many occasions my mental note soon gets forgotten! Luckily this time however I remembered. With the main area photographed I started to have a quick look around the side rooms to see if there was anything of interest to photograph. All I found was rooms full of old papers and light bulbs, however, I did spot this window and took a shot, I am very pleased how this one turned out. I love the book on the window sill and decided to name this photo 'The Missing Chapters' because on the right sill you can see where a book was but has now been moved. Now funny story time.... As I mentioned at the beginning of the report there is a small baptism pool in the floor at the front of the church. You know the one myself and Alex decided to cover over with the carpet to make for nicer photos? Anyway.... Just after I took the photo above I heard a thud and then laughter and as I emerged from the room all I could see was Alex in the bottom of the pool! Luckily he was fine and after taking the mickey out of him for a minute or so we decided to start heading out. As we did so I took 2 more images, one of the lectern and one of the pews. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos from photos on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/119757413@N07/ Final thoughts So what can I say for my final thoughts.... I think from the report you would not be surprised when I say that I really enjoyed my time here, this was my first explore of a church and it is one I will always remember. The architecture is beautiful and the ceiling is just superb. All I hope for is that this location can be re-used in some way and that it is not left to decay beyond repair because if that happens the bulldozers are not usually that far behind, and to me, that would be a crime! Thanks for reading, Dugie
  17. For reasons that seemed like a good idea at the time, we decided to go to Belgium in my car - a Land Rover Defender (short wheel base version). There were four of us in the car, along with some stuff for Hotel Derp, and some camera stuff. Let's just say that the best place to be, from a comfort perspective are the front seats. We figured it would be best to try and get to the first location that evening, although it was a long drive, and then hit it as the sun came up. We arrived very late, but in good spirits. We had a quick look at the farm house, and all was good. Now, don't ask why, as I really have no idea, but for some reason we decided it would be a good idea to sleep in the car, rather than in the derp. I have to tell you it was a very cold night. VERY cold. So much so, that non of us slept that well, we decided to call time on the lack of sleep and get up. We got to the farmhouse before the sun came up... But it was worth it The location is an interesting mix of personal items one almost comes to expect in a farmhouse The things that make a house a home Some traditional farm tools And some things that are just unusual It was a good little visit, and by the time we got back to the car, the sun had been up for a while, so had we, and it was time to leave, on to the next location. After loading up, I went to wipe the condensation from the inside of the windscreen. It took a while - the condensation had frozen!!! Told you it was cold!!! Thanks for viewing
  18. Visited this place in February with Urblex. An unexpected mooch that was cut savagely short by the arrival of the police. Looking at the times on my photographs i'd say we where in there for about 15 mins. Oh well, at least we got out and away without incident. Nice looking place what we seen of it. The clock tower looks awesome and imposing as you approach. Quite a busy area we found with residents/workman/dog walkers, maybe during the week was not the best time:p High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital south of the village of Menston, West Yorkshire, England. The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards. The 300 acre (1.2 km²) estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The administration building, which is Grade II listed, features an Italian mosaic floor in the main corridor which is intricately decorated with the Yorkshire Rose and black daisies - the latter of which provided inspiration for the title of Black Daisies a television screenplay, filmed at High Royds, which took as its subject the experiences of sufferers of Alzheimers disease. The hospital was intended to be largely self-sufficient, and was provided with its own library, surgery, dispensary, butchery, dairies, bakery, shop, upholster's and cobbler's workshops and a large estate partly devoted to agriculture and market gardening. The patients lived in wards and if they were able, were expected to work towards their keep either on the farm, in the kitchens and laundry, or in various handicrafts. The hospital was formerly connected to the Wharfedale railway line by its own small railway system, the High Royds Hospital Railway, but this was closed in 1951. In its final years of operation, High Royds had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. As part of Leeds Mental Health's £47 million reprovision process it was closed, with the wards being relocated to various community mental health units within the city of Leeds in the three years leading up to its closure. These include the Becklin Centre in St James' Hospital and the Mount in the city centre. The hospital was closed in stages between 25 February 2003 and June of the same year. Part of the hospital that has been converted. Thanks for looking.
  19. Heavy Metal was a high capacity steel strip mill which closed in 2012. Access was a bit of a nightmare but made the prize that bit more special. As soon as you make your way inside, the size of the place dawns on you, it's an absolute beast. It's somewhere you could easily spend 2 or 3 days and still not see it all, this is EPIC UMBECKS SLPOREGASM TERRITORY! Cheers for looking
  20. Been a while since i have been on the forums. What a place to get back out. Great morning this one spent in good company. Visited this awesome place with Urblex, Hamtagger (cool to meet you mate),Paul 2129 off 28DL and his friend Kirsty. Urblex was the man of the hour on this one, as he had been afew weeks previous on a successful explore. With him showing us the way we where in this massive playground with out to much trouble. We had not been in long at all when we heard voices coming from the floor below. Turned out to be Lavino off 28DL and his mate. Nice to meet you lads and thanks for showing us bits we might otherwise had missed. I'm with Hamtagger on the next encounter. During the confusion and discomfort of the alarm screaming away i also thought the tall lad dressed all in black was the security and the mooch was over. Not really sure what happened next but we where unfortunately spilt from Hamtagger for a while. We did manage to stumble on the sinks which was very nice. A features I never new anything out. Spent a good four hours in awe and amazement exploring this spot. The variation in features and decay is stunning. Spent parts of the explore with Lavino and his mate and thankfully met back up with Hamtagger and spent most of the explore with him. Never did see the mysterious man in black again, maybe he was one of the people we could hear setting alarms off around this wonderful place. St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O'Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool.The first Junior Seminary of the Diocese was founded at St Edward's College in 1842 as a Catholic 'classical and commercial school' under the direction of the secular clergy and was established in Domingo House, a mansion in Everton. Its President for the next forty years was to be Monsignor Provost John Henry Fisher. When the junior seminarians moved to St Joseph's in 1920 the school was taken over by the Christian Brothers (who also ran St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell) and continues to this day and now serves as the Liverpool Cathedral Choir School. In recognition of the heritage owed to St Edward's College one of the two chapels at Upholland was consecrated as the St Edward the Confessor Chapel. Although Upholland flourished until the 1960s, the rapidly changing social climate in that decade led to a sharp drop in enrolment. In the early 1970s, the northern bishops decided to consolidate the activities of Upholland and Ushaw; from 1972 all junior seminarians in the north attended Upholland, and from 1975 all senior seminarians attended Ushaw. Even as the sole junior seminary for the north of England, however, Upholland continued to suffer a decline in enrolment, and by the 1980s was no longer a traditional seminary but a "boarding school for boys considering a vocation". In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St. John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992. The election of Archbishop Patrick Kelly saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether and the property was sold to Anglo International who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed RC Seminary to 92 apartments, with 220 new build enabling units. The major controversies of the decision were the ongoing financial viability of St Joseph's (it had just started to make a small surplus under Devine's management) and the sale and disposal of the art and artefacts in the college, much of which had been donated by various parishes and people of the Archdiocese who were not offered their donations back. The building has acted as a film location for the McQueen Church explosion in the Channel 4 soap Hollyoaks and in 2012 Lacey Turner filmed scenes for the TV series Bedlam. In March 2013, the feature film 'Noble', based on the life of Christina Noble, filmed scenes at the college where it doubled as an orphanage. Thanks for looking.
  21. Was originally going to post a few pics in the comments on Fat Pandas report as I visited with him but had quite a few pics so thought i'd throw a report together! Coke Manufacturing (Monckton) Coke has been made on the Monckton site at Royston near Barnsley in South Yorkshire for over 130 years. Until December 2014, Monckton was the only independent coke production plant in the UK, and was ranked as one of Europe’s leading producers of high-quality metallurgical coke. On 12 December 2014, the Company confirmed that, with no significant improvement in market conditions or customer demand, Monckton was to close, with coke production ceasing during that month. The Monckton plant is now being de-commissioned and this is expected to take approximately six months. The gas from Monckton coke ovens is used in a combined heat and power plant that can generate up to 11 megawatts of electricity. Not only does this supply all the electricity needed on-site, we actually sell our surplus electricity to the national grid – enough to provide power for more than 1,000 homes. Here's my take on this place Thanks for looking
  22. This old slate mine had some really nice features inside, rusty old mining carts and tracks everywhere. The valley was snowed under when we arrived which made for some epic scenery and the mine itself was a decent size but easy enough to navigate thanks to some tips from Andy. The name comes from it being situated underneath a bat conservation centre, oh and we saw a silhouette of Batman when we arrived! It's otherwise known on here as the Indiana Jones mine. Batman Thanks for looking
  23. After a 3am start and awesome morning at Haslar we headed through London to Colchester to go to Severalls. on arrival just as we was about to negotiate the palisade security flew round the corner in his van and spotted us so we hid in the overgrowth for a short while until the coast was clear, after we was inside we thought any moment that Micheal was going to pop out of nowhere and bust us but due to being careful we managed a good couple hours in there until darkness fell and we headed to the main gates and gave ourselves up instead of going back over the fence! First time using the new camera today finally invested in a decent camera instead of using the trusty old gopro and after spending half the day messing around with settings I managed to come up with enough pics for a report, barely scratched the surface when I visited last month! Visited with Fat Panda, Seldom Seen and a non member Hope you enjoyed
  24. Triton Court is arranged in three buildings, Mercury, Jupiter and Neptune Houses, internally these elements are arranged around a full height 9 storey central atrium. The building was originally constructed in 1920 with a major refurbishment and extension taking place in 1984. Currently it is being transformed into the Alphabeta Building, an office development contract worth £36 million. The project will see the transformation of 220,000 sq ft of office space for creative, media and technology occupiers with 22,000 sq ft of additional A1 retail and restaurant space on the ground and basement floors. I came here with monkey after a busy evening of rooftopping and beers. It was late, the sun was coming up and we were really pissed so we didn't hang around for too long. Cool to see London at that time of day though, can't wait for the summer for more of that. We fancied a bit more time up there so we went back up a little less pissed and a bit earlier this time, Slayaaaa came along for this visit too. Access is a bit bait now so if you fancy a pop at it you'd best be quick, much of the scaff has come down and they've removed the sheets which kept you hidden before. We were spotted by a couple of passers by who just waved at us luckily, apart from that it was plain sailing with a tiny bit of climbing to the top. How it looks without the scaff (not my photo).... .....and now Revisit A statue of the Roman God 'Mercury' stands on top of a globe at the highest point Lowndes House Thanks for looking
  25. Val Saint Lambert is a Belgian crystal glassware manufacturer, founded in 1826. Val St Lambert is the official glassware supplier to H.M. King Albert II of Belgium. We were a bit sick of the sight of razor wire on this trip and nearly turned back when we found it protecting this old factory. Thankfully it didn't take us long to figure out a way past it and it was worth the effort. Once inside it was a nice chilled wander and good to see something a bit different. Before we left we found a way into the live bit of the site which had far more stuff lying around in the dark, I didn't get many photos in there as we had didn't have time for light painting but easily could've spent another couple of hours in there. Plants taking over Crystal glasses Tongs and tools hanging up Couple of random cool bits of graffiti dotted around Inside the more active side, rooms full of machine parts.... With no tunnels in sight Wevsky was a bit bored until we found him a dead frog to play with : Thanks for looking
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