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  1. I Saw this and i had to go! its a cool little underground hospital bigger than i thought it would be, Really enjoyed this one The medical centre was part of the Firth Brown's and was used for medicals to look after any injured employees from the factories. A little history on firth browns, that im sure you all know allready but still...... John Brown founded his company in the 1840s to manufacture steel files. Over the years the emphasis moved to the manufacture of railway track, made from steel provided by the new Bessemer process, and later to rail coach springs. Shipcladding and shipbuilding interests came into the company portfolio and finally, in the 1950s to general construction. In the late 1830s Thomas Firth was head melter at Sheffield crucible steelmakers Sanderson Brothers. He had fathered ten children, seven boys and three girls. Two of the sons, Mark and Thomas junior followed in fathers footsteps and started work at Sanderson Brothers but in 1842 left to set up their own business, their father joining them shortly afterwards. In the 1850s and '60s Thomas Firth supplied Samuel Colt with most of the iron and steel used at his firearms factories both at Hartford Connecticut and the short-lived facility in Pimlico, London. Business grew and moved into the armaments market directly, the company installing two Nasmyth Steam forge hammers in 1863 which were used to forge heavy artillery pieces. In 1871, Firth's cast the thirty five ton Woolwich Infant gun and 5 years later they produced an eighty ton gun. In 1902 Sheffield steelmakers John Brown & Company exchanged shares and came to a working agreement with neighbouring company Thomas Firth & Sons, the companies continuing under their own management until they finally merged in 1930 n 1973 Firth Brown merged with the Derby and Manchester-based wire-making firm Richard Johnson and Nephew, to form Johnson and Firth Brown Ltd (JFB).
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