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Found 68 results

  1. Built in 1884 Villa S. ist regarded as the first casino at this coast. After decades of desertion and decay it burned down in 2006. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13
  2. King’s Hall Southall Visited with @GK_WAX and @Lavino. This was a long arsed day but a good un non the less. The lads picked me up just gone midnight for the long drive down south. I’d been to a gig and I was smashed hoping to get some sleep in the car. Fat chance of that. After nailing some greasy takeaway on my way back from town and downing a crate of redbulls I was pretty awake, sobered up and ready for some derpingz. After gaining access, which was very straightforward we found ourselves a lovely skanky little room to chill out in for a couple of hours whilst we waited for sunrise. Bumped into two other explorers in there who gave @GK_WAX a heart attack LOL! It’s a pretty cool place this, a lot bigger than what photo’s you see online, but all of the rooms at the back are pretty much the same old derpy office/classroom type and not much character to photograph. It’s amazing that this place hasn’t been shut for as long as it looks because it’s super fooked. Absolutely hammered with pigeons and mountains of their shit. Plaster falling down from every possible point, the floors are all warped like some big shit parquet Mexican wave, but still it is a pretty unique building with some lovely tiling and worth popping over to if you’re around this way. After here we tried a few other places in the area and on the way back, sadly to no avail. You can’t win em all eh. So yeah long arse drive home just in time to watch the footy order a pizza and get back on the beers. History Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013. Pics
  3. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  4. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  5. This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  6. The Visit After a fantastic explore earlier in the day we were not expecting a great deal here but were pleasantly surprised by this places charm and character.. all kind of bits and bobs about telling a story of the people that once lived there. I believe its known as Red Dress Manor but seen as there is no red dress anymore I'm calling it "Blind Cat Manor" from now on in honour of the lovely blind and deaf (I think) cat that we said hello to on the way out The History Struggling to find detailed history unfortunately. Calcott Hall was grade II listed in 1953 and was home to a dairy farm built in 1725 And here is the poor little cat that seemed to be blind and deaf
  7. This was the last stop on our trip on Sunday, was a little bit of a let down. History - Cornist Hall, built sometime in the early 1700s, is a former luxury mansion located in the town of Flint, Wales. It is a Jacobethan style brick and stone structure; although this term was not coined until 1933, and it was the birthplace of Thomas Totty, an admiral who served on the HMS Invincible and alongside Lord Nelson. The town of Flint itself, which derives its name from the Latin term castellum super fluentum (meaning ‘castle on the river’), was a major port and since the 1200s people have inhabited the area for the convenient shape of the land. In later years Flint became well-know for its close proximity to Liverpool, for naval and trade purposes; their main forms of trade principally involved fish and the slave markets. By 1884, the house was purchased by the industrialist, Richard Muspratt, and he commissioned John Douglas, an architect from Chester, to entirely remodel the mansion throughout. Unfortunately, Muspratt died before the house could be altered. The Summers family, who ran an ironworks business; John Summers and Sons in Shotton, were the next to take the house on, and they managed to proceed with making the much needed alterations to the building. By 1953, however, the ownership of the mansion changed hands once again, when it was passed to the Local Authority. After the Local Authority assumed ownership the building was modified internally for catering purposes. The Hall remained in the ownership of the Local Authority up until 1986, when the Napier family purchased the property. It was later redeveloped into a wedding and banqueting venue. Although it was a popular scene, the Hall was eventually converted into the local golf club’s club-house. Despite the change of hands, Cornist Hall continued to cater for weddings up until its closure in 2012. Since its closure, Flint’s local community have petitioned to save the building, in the hope that it will gain listed status and fall under the ownership of the local populace. In the past few years, since the closure of Cornist Hall, a number of local people have complained about the increase in anti-social behaviour and vandalism, suggesting that the former mansion is a magnet for such activities.
  8. The Explore This is one I've seen pop up a few times lately so thought I'd check it myself.. as a few have mentioned access isn't the easiest and whoever owns this building seems to have a fetish for anti-vandal paint.. its everywhere, inside and out! After all this I was a little disappointed with the inside of this building sadly.. peoples pics on the forum certainly make it look better than it actually is Fun and games with a mirror ball and a few torches certainly cheered us up though The History Cornist Hall, built sometime in the early 1700s, is a former luxury mansion located in the town of Flint, Wales. It is a Jacobethan style brick and stone structure; although this term was not coined until 1933, and it was the birthplace of Thomas Totty, an admiral who served on the HMS Invincible and alongside Lord Nelson. The town of Flint itself, which derives its name from the Latin term castellum super fluentum (meaning ‘castle on the river’), was a major port and since the 1200s people have inhabited the area for the convenient shape of the land. In later years Flint became well-know for its close proximity to Liverpool, for naval and trade purposes; their main forms of trade principally involved fish and the slave markets. By 1884, the house was purchased by the industrialist, Richard Muspratt, and he commissioned John Douglas, an architect from Chester, to entirely remodel the mansion throughout. Unfortunately, Muspratt died before the house could be altered. The Summers family, who ran an ironworks business; John Summers and Sons in Shotton, were the next to take the house on, and they managed to proceed with making the much needed alterations to the building. By 1953, however, the ownership of the mansion changed hands once again, when it was passed to the Local Authority. After the Local Authority assumed ownership the building was modified internally for catering purposes. The Hall remained in the ownership of the Local Authority up until 1986, when the Napier family purchased the property. It was later redeveloped into a wedding and banqueting venue. Although it was a popular scene, the Hall was eventually converted into the local golf club’s club-house. Despite the change of hands, Cornist Hall continued to cater for weddings up until its closure in 2012. Since its closure, Flint’s local community have petitioned to save the building, in the hope that it will gain listed status and fall under the ownership of the local populace. In the past few years, since the closure of Cornist Hall, a number of local people have complained about the increase in anti-social behaviour and vandalism, suggesting that the former mansion is a magnet for such activities.
  9. Visited the hall with @woopashoopaa @Telf and vulex, very nice this one. Even though you here voices while inside the back part is still live and used for the club house for the golf club. Some nice features still remain.so here's a bit of history I managed to dig up and a few pics... Cornist Hall was once the residence of the Sumners family who founded and owned the steel works at Shotton on Deeside, five or six miles away from Flint. Today the Hall has been turned into the local Golf Club's club-house, and part of it is used for wedding receptions and similar functions. It was used as a restaurant for a short time but failed to make money. The grounds of the Hall form the nine hole golf course and park. Many men from Flint once worked at the steel works, today most have been made redundant. It seems slightly ironic that they should spend their time playing golf on the land of the man who was once their employer.
  10. The Visit A very early morning start with redhunter, Funlester and a non member. Bumped into a farmer who asked what we were doing but some quick thinking that we were looking for some high ground to photograph the morning mist over the fields worked a treat and he left wishing us good luck! This is a great explore and some fantastic features inside, real shame we couldn't access the basement but a great explore otherwise The History This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname 'House of Tears' comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside.
  11. History: This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname 'House of Tears' comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside. Explore: Wanted to visit this one for a while, and after me and redhunter convinced loocyloo to pull a sickie and come with us, we were soon on our way up to Shropshire. After a while we gained access in probably the most awkward way possible, but hey we were in! Our exit was a little less dignified, with loocyloo getting stuck on the edge of a wall, and some top class bull from redhunter about how we found the place when confronted by angry farmers. "found it on the British heritage website, and no we definitely haven't been inside" actually worked?!? after threatening to confiscate our cameras and some strong protest from us they went to check the alarms, at which point we made a hasty exit through a field of not so happy cows.. On with some pictures i got from not going inside.. and to finish up, one i actually took from the outside!
  12. This is first time out with my camera Nikon D5200 and first time doing any Urbex at all. Went out with two mates and big thanks for them for letting me tag along on this trip and a few more that ill post at some point. We tried one place first but couldn't get access. History The hall was built in the 1560s for the Winstanley family of Winstanley; the Winstanley family were lords of the manor since at least 1252 and may have been responsible for building the moat on the site. The Winstanleys owned the hall until 1596, when the estate was sold to James Bankes, a London goldsmith and banker. Winstanley Hall has three storeys and has a date stone with a date of 1584, but this is not in situ so may not provide an accurate date for the construction of the house. Extra blocks were added in the 17th and 18th centuries. Further and extensive alterations were made in 1811-19 by Lewis Wyatt in a Jacobean style. He moved the entrance to the left flank of the hall and replacing the original entrance with a window. The final additions to the hall were made in 1843 when an extra wing was added. To the south, on lands belonging to the hall, is a small stone building which was used to house bears that provided entertainment for the hall's guests. The Winstanley Family also owned the Braunstone Hall estate. The Bankes family retained ownership of the hall until the 21st century when it was sold for private development. The hall had been kept in good condition until the 1960s when habitation stopped. As the building decayed and the cost of maintaining Winstanley Hall was too much for the family it was sold on. It was intended to develop the hall into private flats, however refurbishment was held up due to Wigan council withholding planning permission.
  13. We visited this after a failed attempted at a different site. History Daresbury Hall is a former country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. In 1755 John Daniell sold the manor of Daresbury to George Heron and the Hall was built about 1760.It remained in the Heron family until 1850 when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. In 1892 Sir Gilbert Greenall is listed as the owner. For a time it was home to Lord Daresbury and his family as part of the original Greenall brewery family estate in it's prime, now known as The De Vere Group. During World War II the estate was converted to be used as a military hospital, which saw the addition of the Lewis Carol Unit added to the site. In 1955, shortly after the war, the Hall was taken over by the National Spastics Society, now known as “Scope†as a residential home with good facilities for adults suffering from cerebral palsy. Many more structures were built on the site to house the patients and staff such as the row of small houses at the front, outhouse buildings and the caretaker’s bungalow. Many village functions were also held in the Hall such as country dances, but eventually the residents were moved to other accommodation in Halton. Many years after the spastic society had vacated the premises, it was sold to a millionaire bachelor Malcolm Lionel Robert Royle for a sizeable fee and the manor returned to it's former use as a stately home. Mr. Royle was managing director of several companies, including Rains Estates and Smarties Nursery School, all to which can be evidentially seen within the building today. Such as endless records and files of what appears to be estate agent documents, leaflets, letters and even written cheques. Sadly, due to poor maintenance following his death the buildings have fallen into a state of disrepair and stands uninhabitable. The Manor was left exactly as the owner had left it for some time. Daresbury Hall has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II listed building and seeks planning permission to be restored – which may prove as an impossible task!
  14. This was a full fun visit and a lovely tricky one to get in to. History Brogyntyn Hall was constructed in 1975. It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the houses of the gentry in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family, Lord Harlech. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.
  15. History “The longer it stays in the condition it is in, the reality of the situation is the more damaged the fabric of the site will become… We have seen what happened with sites like Denbigh Hospital – they were buildings that were allowed to fall into a condition of disrepair†(Cllr Aldridge). Cornist Hall, built sometime in the early 1700s, is a former luxury mansion located in the town of Flint, Wales. It is a Jacobethan style brick and stone structure; although this term was not coined until 1933, and it was the birthplace of Thomas Totty, an admiral who served on the HMS Invincible and alongside Lord Nelson. The town of Flint itself, which derives its name from the Latin term castellum super fluentum (meaning ‘castle on the river’), was a major port and since the 1200s people have inhabited the area for the convenient shape of the land. In later years Flint became well-know for its close proximity to Liverpool, for naval and trade purposes; their main forms of trade principally involved fish and the slave markets. By 1884, the house was purchased by the industrialist, Richard Muspratt, and he commissioned John Douglas, an architect from Chester, to entirely remodel the mansion throughout. Unfortunately, Muspratt died before the house could be altered. The Summers family, who ran an ironworks business; John Summers and Sons in Shotton, were the next to take the house on, and they managed to proceed with making the much needed alterations to the building. By 1953, however, the ownership of the mansion changed hands once again, when it was passed to the Local Authority. After the Local Authority assumed ownership the building was modified internally for catering purposes. The Hall remained in the ownership of the Local Authority up until 1986, when the Napier family purchased the property. It was later redeveloped into a wedding and banqueting venue. Although it was a popular scene, the Hall was eventually converted into the local golf club’s club-house. Despite the change of hands, Cornist Hall continued to cater for weddings up until its closure in 2012. Since its closure, Flint’s local community have petitioned to save the building, in the hope that it will gain listed status and fall under the ownership of the local populace. In the past few years, since the closure of Cornist Hall, a number of local people have complained about the increase in anti-social behaviour and vandalism, suggesting that the former mansion is a magnet for such activities. Our Version of Events After bombing through Wales, in our effort to conserve daylight, we eventually arrived in the town of Flint. It was a quiet scene, and we were conscious that we looked a little out of place, surrounded by local dog walkers and other country folk. So, to blend in a bit, and counter hunger and the long walk we’d created for ourselves from where we’d parked the cars, we [some of us] did a little berry picking on the way. We all survived, so I’m assuming they were edible. Once we reached the old Hall, it was heavily boarded up, so it required a little effort to get inside. As the history states above, the people in the surrounding area have become frustrated by the increasing illicit activity going on in the Hall. Having said that, they still failed to keep us out, and we were soon able to sample the delights Cornist Hall holds behind its wooden boards and ant-climb paint. For the most part, the building is quite stripped, although plenty still remains; including a working piano and an archaic record player. It would appear that bats have also taken up residence upstairs inside the building, which makes a pleasant change from fetid one-legged pigeons. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, The Hurricane, Box and Husky. 1: Cornist Hall 2: The Former Entrance 3: Racks and Stacks 4: Old Record Player 5: Record Player Close Up 6: The Piano 7: Old Furniture 8: Classic Fireplace 9: The Bar Upstairs 10: One of the Function Rooms 11: A Small Comfortable Side Room 12: Supplies in the Kitchen 13: The Kitchen 14: A Taste of the Upstairs Rooms 15: Bottom of the Main Staircase 16: The Clutter Downstairs 17: Downstairs Small Bar 18: Memorabilia 19: The Former Dining Room 20: Specials 21: The Dance Room 22: Another Bar 23: Weighing Up the Choices 24: Main Staircase Window 25: A Bad Taste in Curtains and Lampshades 26: The Main Staircase
  16. I recently visited this place with @Lavino and 2 members from another site. We spent a couple of hours walking around the place and then we were in, and the place did not let us down it looked amazing . But when we were walking around there were PIR sensers all around it and every time you walked past one it said a message. But the funniest bit is when you walk around the front because classical music starts blurring out from inside (Almost defend me when we got to the bit it was playing at). Anyway enjoy the pics and history . The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was designed by W. E. Nesfield in the 1870s, and the adjoining Venetian Gardens were designed by his father, W. A. Nesfield. The adjoining Neo-palladian style stable block is attributed to William Burn, with construction completed in the 1850s. Materials for construction were bought from the nearby Lleweni Hall. The house is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres (73,000 m2), which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres (20 km2), encompassing open fields, parkland and forests.[citation needed] The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. Ownership of the house has been dominated by the Hughes, Lewis and Fetherstonhaugh and Gill families. There are many heraldic shields displayed throughout the house which show evidence of the unions between these families. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism, by Mrs Florence Lindley, formerly headmistress of Lowther College, at the nearby Bodelwyddan Castle. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land.[3] However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price.[4] He intended to develop the property into a hotel,[5] but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. Lotus Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings in 2015. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was designed by W. E. Nesfield in the 1870s, and the adjoining Venetian Gardens were designed by his father, W. A. Nesfield. The adjoining Neo-palladian style stable block is attributed to William Burn, with construction completed in the 1850s. Materials for construction were bought from the nearby Lleweni Hall. The house is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres (73,000 m2), which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres (20 km2), encompassing open fields, parkland and forests.[citation needed] The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands.[1] Ownership of the house has been dominated by the Hughes, Lewis and Fetherstonhaugh and Gill families. There are many heraldic shields displayed throughout the house which show evidence of the unions between these families. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism, by Mrs Florence Lindley, formerly headmistress of Lowther College, at the nearby Bodelwyddan Castle. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital.[2] Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land.[3] However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price.[4] He intended to develop the property into a hotel,[5] but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict.[6] Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings in 2015.[7][6]
  17. Visited lotus hall/cuckoo hall or whatever it's now called. With myself @woopashoopaa @vulex and @GK_WAX was a very nice place. Great landscape views with lots of pir cameras and sensors everywhere and a voice on repeat telling you your on cctv and classical music blaring out from inside. After finally getting in. The main hall is very nice. But my camera was on the wrong setting so pics not turned out as good as I'd hoped so here's the history and pics... Kinmel Hall was built 1871-76 on the same site as two previous houses to designs of the famed architect William Eden Nesfield. The house has 52 main bedrooms and quarters for 60 live-in servants. The huge house even included a room solely for ironing newspapers! The house was commissioned by Hugh Robert Hughes, affectionately known as “HRH†when the Kinmel Estate was passed to him following the death of his uncle William Lewis Hughes, second Lord Dinorben. The estate had only been handed down to William 8 months prior following the death of his father, William Lewis Hughes, Dinorben of Kinmel. The impressive Neo-palladian style stable block was added in the 1850s to designs by William Burn. The Hughes family remained in the home until 1929. By this time the estate was considerably smaller than when the hall was built, owing to the lavish lifestyles of the family and the extensive building programme embarked upon by HRH. The house was converted for use as a ‘rheuma spa’, a health centre to treat people with rheumatism. The house was used as a hospital during World War II.
  18. Came across this one; Kinmel Hall near Rhyl - North Wales. Not too far from me so I'm going to do a little research about reaching the place via public transport (unfortunately I don't drive..). Some history on the Hall: http://docs.novaloca.com/165_20062_634595428790297892.pdf The article: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/architecture/kinmel-hall-the-welsh-versailles-lies-derelict-and-unloved--who-will-come-to-its-rescue-10502644.html?cmpid=facebook-post
  19. Since my visit two months ago, a lot has happened at Daresbury Hall. On my last visit, there was a distinctive smell of cannabis, to which I kept my business out from. But just a matter of weeks after my first visit it was on the news that Cheshire Police has raided a cannabis farm of a massive scale at Daresbury Hall. That would explain the smell, and it occured to me just how lucky I was in there, considering I was literally stood on the opposite side of the door leading to where the plants were growing! Once the heat had died down a little from the media, I decided to pay another visit to Daresbury Hall. DARESBURY HALL So without further ado, let's have a look Staff Accommodation The first stop this time was by the old staff's homes, located to the north, at the front of the grounds. The "Annex" Building Next up is the "Annex Building" which was built onto the side of the manor. This is the location in which the cannabis was seized. The feeling in here was a little uneasy, but none-the-less exciting to think what had gone on within these walls over the past months. Filling the corridors leading out from the two main rooms where foam insulation, aluminium boards and ventilation/cooling tubes, numerous bags of compost, fans, heat lamps and endless amounts of plant pots. It was until seeing this for myself it was obvious of the sheer size of this operation. The Basement Leading out onto the corridor in the annex building was a door which lead down into a basement area. The stairs where made from conrete and the air got colder the further down you went. From the looks of it, this area was once used as sort of utility area for washing and drying clothes. Doors labelled with "Airing Room" and "Drying Room" gave me this impression. i decided to record footage of the basement when all of a sudden we heard loud bangs and talking from above us. We weren't as alone as we thought we were.. Police? Security? Someone out to cause trouble? Or have the drug "warlords" come back to salvage anything that they can? We turned off our torches and hid in one of the rooms in complete darkness, until we heard the sounds getting closer and closer to the stairs - which was also the only exit from the basement. We decided to turn the torches back on and shine them in the direction of the stairs in an attempt to inform who ever it was that we were down there. Considering they were also shining their torches down the stairs it was difficult to see each others beams of light and they were just as startled as us, if not more as we knew they were there, they had no idea others were down there! Turns out it was only some fellow explorers! But anyway, on with the photographs: Corridor Leading to Pool Area Not entirely sure what this area was used for, but my guess would be at most recent, some sort of offices, as each room had computer parts, filing cabinets and desks. During the days of the site been used by Scope, considering how close these rooms are to the pool area my guess would be that these where maybe dressing rooms for the patients to prepare for their activities in the pool. Caretaker's Bungalow Added to the site during the ownership of Scope, the Caretaker's Bungalow in situated at the front of the property. This is also the building in which there is clear evidence to how that who ever was looking after the cannabis farm was infact living here. On my previous visit, a German Shephard was happily sat on the grass beside it's kennel just to the side of this bungalow. Inside was clothes, an ironing board, a TV with muliple films, a pair of glasses and many forms of nicotine replacement therapy such as e-cig oils and Niquiten tablets. In the kitchen was food which was still fresh and way off reaching it's sell-by-date. There was also a make-shift lead in one of the bedroom which may have been used to walk the guard dog. Inside the bungalow was yet more plant pots and aluminium tubing. "House No.2" I am really puzzled as to what the purpose of this building was, but i will just call it "House No.2". It's located to the east of the manor and has had some fairly recent work done to it in an attempt for some more modern decor. Inside it looked as though painters and decorators had just packed up and left - perhaps not even packed up, but just simply left. Scatter throughout all rooms were unopened or partially opened DIY materials such as wall tiles and plasterboards. On one unopened pack was a dispatch note in the name of Mr Royle, who I believe to have be the latest occupant of the estate, dated back to 2006. From what I gather, Mr Royle passed away, which dissolved his multiple businesses and stopped any work done to the grounds, including this renovation. The style of this building was much more modern compared to any of the others, with spot lights, fancy mirrors and ceiling lights, glass shelves and modern black and red worktops and units. It almost looked like a nightclub of some sort, with a what appeared to be a media room with a freshly installed entertainment unit that would house a fairly large TV. There was also a brand new sauna which had been installed in one of the back rooms. The only room which showed a significant amount of damage was the kitchen, due to all the mould. It seemed such a shame to see all of this work go to waste.. The Main Manor Probably the most anticipated area of them all, the main manor, situated in the centre of the site. This building is very damaged due to what appears to be a broken water pipe, as the majority of the ground floor is extremely damp to walk on and the smell in some areas is revolting. After entering the manor the first room appears to be the main living room. CDs and DVDs scatter the floor, along with fancy couches and chairs, a glass table and an exquisit chariot ornament sitting in the fireplace. There was also a portrait in a gold frame of an oil painting of who I believe to be the man and lady of the house at some point. Further through past the living room and another living area which had family photos sprawled across the floor. It makes you wonder why such sentimental belongings weren't taken by relatives. If there are any of course. Into the next room, which looked to be an office of some description had dozens of filing cabinets and folders, all business related. Estate angency documents for "Rains", nursury plaques and letters for "Smarties", both in which were registered companies of Malcolm Royle, the former owner on the premesis. Further down the hallway the floor began to seep with stale water. Passing clothes rails with shirts still on their hangers and countless VHS tapes, on the left was a strange looking room with two baths built into the ground, and opposite was a small toilet. Even further through the hallway came yet another living room with a few coffee tables and a shoe-rack, to which still held several pairs of gentlemen's shoes aswell as a couple of chandeliers on the floor. Round to the right hand side was a small kitchen. Unlikely to be the 'main' kitchen area due to it's small size, there is a microwave and a refridgerator which still had a dozen eggs in there. Needless to say I chose not to look any closer. Across the worktops and the floor were many dinner plates, cutlery and place mats that's been previous raided from the cupboards. Although I never actually found the stairs (after looking not twice, but three times), I eventually found an elevator shaft, which i didn't fancy going anywhere near, as it was surrounded by drenched carpets and soggy clothes. On the way out, perhaps my favourite find of the day, a 1982 LP of Michael Jackson's "Thriller"! And here it is...! I seem to have been a little 'trigger happy' and I've hit my limit of the maximum amount of photos I am allowed to attach! If anyone is interested in seeing more, including an unused brand new sauna, more shots of the drug raid, a few extra external views, and a lot more graffiti, feel free to have a peek HERE You can also view the shots from my first visit to Daresbury Hall (whilst the cannabis was still in there..). If you've got this far, thanks for taking the time to check out my first report \o/
  20. Stanford Hall is a large 18th century, grade II listed country house in the UK. Since being used as a private residence the house has had a couple of different uses which have unfortunately removed a lot of the buildings splendour. A number of failed redevelopment projects were started, and recently a planning application has been approved to develop the building into a Defence and National Rehabilitation Centre. An extension added an impressive Art Deco theatre in the 1930s which still remains in perfect condition. Murals decorate the walls and the ceiling features painted clouds. A Wurlitzer organ is built into the orchestra pit. 1. Rear elevation Our visit Spider Monkey and I had noticed this place was unoccupied so thought we would go and check it out. Although the place has lost a lot of its grandeur over the years and the failed developments have further detracted, the building is still very impressive. The theatre was my personal highlight. Sadly, I understand the theatre will be pulled down. 2. Sunburst into grand room 3. Fireplace and elegance 4. More grand rooms 5. The "Kitkat" room 6. Top of the stairs 7. Looking down the stairs 8. Staircase and fireplace 9. Theatre lobby 10. The stunning theatre 11. In the aisle of the theatre 12. Looking back 13. Wurlitzer Organ 14. Safety curtain with depiction of the hall 15. Original 1930s Brenkert Master Brenograph projector 16. Projector detail 17. Spotlight and record player 18. Film reel room 19. Film reels 20. Entrance hall 21. Ballroom 22. Ballroom 23. Wood panelled room 24. Bedroom 25. Bedroom 26. Grand room upstairs 27. Marble bathroom 28. Squash courts 29. Front of the house 30. Back of the huge property
  21. Explored with Rott3nW00d & Raz; So the last report was killing me as there wasn't one single decent photo out of the lot... So we went for a revisit History; Firbeck Hall was formerly the home of 19th-century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight who is assumed to have been a principal information source for Walter Scott during the writing of Ivanhoe. Firbeck Hall was built in 1594 by William West, who made a fortune practising law and serving as an associate to Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury from 1580 to 1594. West was the author of a legal textbook called Symbolaeographia. In his will of 1598, West stipulated that "a grave stone be set for me and my said wife in Firbeck Church, and ingraven with our arms and names and some posy." Country Club In 1935 a Sheffield stockbroker, Cyril Nicholson, opened the hall as a country club, investing £80,000 in its renovation. The interior was dramatically modernised and featured a mirror-walled ballroom and an elaborate and versatile state-of-the-art lighting system. There was also a heated outdoor swimming pool. Membership fees ranged from three to seven guineas, and the club was patronised by the likes of Amy Johnson and the then Prince of Wales. Such was the reputation of the club, that the BBC transmitted its weekly Saturday show "Late Night Dance Music" with Henry Hall, Carroll Gibbons and Charlie Kunz from Firbeck. Second World War – present day At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck. After the War, the building was bought by the Miners Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners. This centre closed in 1984. It was purchased by Cambridge Construction. From then the Hall fell into a state of disrepair. The Explore; As mentioned above i have recently posted a report on this location but the photos and quality were dire. So off we went for another look. 1 year had passed since our last visit and if the place was knackered before its even worse now!! floors that were safe last time have collapsed, some of the doors were bearing the full weight of the wall/house above them and if you tried to move quickly anywhere you were pretty likely to be seriously injured if not worse. All the upstairs in now pretty much unaccessable unless you have a death wish so we missed out on one of the best stair cases i've seen All in all this place will soon not need to be knocked down as it will have fallen down of its own accord and if you do go, the swimming pool is the best bit by far Photos; Wrote my page name on this plate on my last visit Spent about 45 mins playing with long exposure at the end - brilliant fun If you got this far, thanks for looking
  22. Explore with Raz & a non member. I was considering code naming this Dodgey Floor Galore due to the fact that while exploring Raz ended up waist deep in the buildings foundations looking like he was wading through floorboards Some of the rooms in this old place look like they were designed by Tony Hawk and would make for the worlds best albiet most dangerous skatepark! History Firbeck Hall was formerly the home of 19th-century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight who is assumed to have been a principal information source for Walter Scott during the writing of Ivanhoe. Firbeck Hall was built in 1594 by William West, who made a fortune practising law and serving as an associate to Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury from 1580 to 1594. West was the author of a legal textbook called Symbolaeographia. In his will of 1598, West stipulated that "a grave stone be set for me and my said wife in Firbeck Church, and ingraven with our arms and names and some posy." Country Club In 1935 a Sheffield stockbroker, Cyril Nicholson, opened the hall as a country club, investing £80,000 in its renovation. The interior was dramatically modernised and featured a mirror-walled ballroom and an elaborate and versatile state-of-the-art lighting system. There was also a heated outdoor swimming pool. Membership fees ranged from three to seven guineas, and the club was patronised by the likes of Amy Johnson and the then Prince of Wales. Such was the reputation of the club, that the BBC transmitted its weekly Saturday show "Late Night Dance Music" with Henry Hall, Carroll Gibbons and Charlie Kunz from Firbeck. Second World War – present day At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck. After the War, the building was bought by the Miners Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners. This centre closed in 1984. It was purchased by Cambridge Construction. From then the Hall fell into a state of disrepair. Apologies for the low quality images, facebook is the devil Photos; Thanks for reading
  23. Visited this amazing grade one listed mansion with woopashoopaa and Tom let me just say what a great huge building this is with so many great features. Spend hours here just wondering around this place. The grounds and views are out of this world. With its own chapel in its vast grounds. And that is totally untouched. Complete with electricity the stained glass well these pics don't do the place justice. On with my history and pictures of the place.... Pitchford Hall was built in 1560-70 by William Ottley, the Sheriff of Shropshire. However, the Hall probably has a 14th or 15th century core within the current structure. Originally, the hall was set in around 14 hectares of park and woodland. Attached to the hall is an orangery, which is also registered 'at risk' (Grade II listing). The treehouse (perched in a large lime tree) at Pitchford Hall was built in the 17th century in the same style as the hall itself. It may be the oldest oldest treehouse in the world, and even boasts an oak floor and gothic windows! The estate also contains some good examples of Roman and Victorian baths. Shrewsbury & Atcham Borough Council recently suggested designating Pitchford as a conservation Area, but the idea wasn't popular with locals. Unlike other similar properties, the hall has always remained in private hands - in fact it remained in the same family for many generations. However, in 1992, the then owners - financially hit by their responsibilities as Lloyds names - were forced to sell off the hall and for the first time in its history, the estate was split up. Pitchford Hall and estate are now separately owned. Pitchford Hall Pitchford Hall The condition of the hall is classified by English Heritage as 'fair'. Extensive work was done on the hall in the 19th century. Despite now lying vacant, ongoing work has improved the condition of the roof in particular. Additional work is required to some timber in the East wing and around window frames. Pitchford has also attracted a fair number of celebrities. In 1832, a few years before her coronation, the young Queen Victoria visited the hall with her mother. In her diary, the princess describes the hall as a large "cottage"! Meanwhile, in 1935, the hall also received the Duke of York and his wife - later to become George VI and Queen Elizabeth (the Queen Mother). It is claimed that Prince Rupert sought refuge in the hall's priest hole after the siege of Shrewsbury, while some of his troops hid in the subterranean tunnel on the estate. Pitchford Hall is also reputed to be home to a number of ghosts, including an unknown cavalier and the late owner, Robin Grant. The beatyful chapel..
  24. Visited the nice old hall with friend Tom and woopashoopaa. Was part of the days planned road trip. It took us a while to find this one but managed to get there in the end after thinking it was in another location and trecking through fields of dead sheep . And around various farm houses we eventually found it. Nice big old place and when we scouted it out for a while and made our entrane not long after we heard the alarms screaming so grabbed a few shot and made our way out as the building next door is live and is part of the estate. So here's a few pics I did manage to get and some history... Brogyntyn Hall has stood abandoned for 15 years. It was owned by the Lord Harlech until 2000. Settled in the 1600s the house and its estate once presided over the land as far as the eye can see. The family was one of the great English dynasties and owners of Harlech Castle in North Wales as well. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe. This is when it was used for the telecommunications
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