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Found 4 results

  1. The Road of Remembrance bunker lies midway on the Road of Remembrance, and it was used as a WW2 naval communication centre. It was originally built with 2 entrances, a number of toilets, and a ventilation room directly above the complex. There are still the remains of WW2 posters up around the walls. For its position on the roadside the bunker is in relatively good condition and is well worth a visit. A short walk down the road sees yourself strolling onto the old Folkestone harbour train station, with hardly any energy left I didn't venture down to the lighthouse but at least it gives me a reason to go back. Hope you like the photo's, comments are always welcomed. Ryda A medium size photo just doesnt do this one justice:
  2. This place has intrigued me since I saw it about 4 or 5 years ago, but I had no idea it was derelict until about a year ago - from a distance it looks like it's still in use as it's not in that bad shape. I'm not sure if this was a control tower of some sort, or merely an observation platform. It's next to folkestone harbour, and yellow pages dating would put it's closure at around 2003/4. Unfortunitely I didn't get many photos - I was somewhat limited photography wise as we couldn't use torches being surrounded by glass in direct line of sight of the the harbour entrance, but I thought I'd stick them up anyway. We did venture into the lower levels of the tower, but I couldn't photograph anything down there - it was too dark - there wasn't much left to see anyway, kitchen, staff room and offices. This is what it looks like on the outside This is what it looks like at the top on the inside And the view out of a couple of the very dirty windows at the top Apologies for the photos, but I thought it was interesting enough to warrant a post. Maniac.
  3. After seeing Superwide's previous post viewtopic.php?f=14&t=736&p=5918&hilit=Folkestone+Harbour#p5862 and talking to a couple of work mates who actually worked there and wanted to do a bit of a history of stations display at work. I decided to go and explore it for myself. So with Mrs PowerSurge and Toddler PowerSurge in tow I headed down to Folkestone to meet up with Oldie68. The weather was brilliant and Oldie had a lot of good advice and history on the Station. Of course during my explore Mrs PowerSurge and Toddler PowerSurge went shopping with my debit card So on with my little report. Source of History:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Folkestone Harbour station was built to serve the port of Folkestone, and is one of three stations in the town. It is at the end of the short 1-in-30 gradient Folkestone Harbour Branch Line. The branch and harbour station provided a rail connection for boat trains from London which connected with the ferry services to Calais and Boulogne. The branch and station closed to regular passenger train services in 2001 although the line and station continued to be used by the Venice-Simplon Orient Express (VSOE) and railtours. As of March 2009 Network Rail intend to close the branch, and an association has formed to preserve it as a heritage line. The branch line was built in 1844 leaving the main line at Folkestone Junction and was double tracked ending with a viaduct across the harbour itself. In 1847 a swing bridge allowed the line to reach the southern pier and in 1848 the line was passed by the Board of Trade for passenger use. The line was electrified at the same time as the main line during the "Kent Coast Electrification - Stage 2" in June 1961, and passenger trains were formed of Electric multiple units. Freight services were withdrawn on 17 August 1968. In 1994, the opening of the Channel Tunnel led to the majority of ferry operators moving to other ports in the South East, with the result that only two services per day were arriving at Folkestone Harbour, to connect with the Hoverspeed SeaCat services. When these were moved to Ramsgate, Folkestone Harbour the station closed to ordinary rail traffic in 2001. Sometime after 2001 the line was turned into just a single track. The proposals for the regeneration of the Harbour area will see additional accommodation built; however, it has been determined that this will not be sufficient to justify reopening the rail link to the Harbour. Due to its infrequent use it has been proposed that Folkestone Harbour be closed permanently, the viaduct demolished, and the track on the rail spur lifted. On 12 April 2008, a closure ceremony, together with an official last train took place. However, objections had been raised by English, Welsh and Scottish Railway, Department for transport and Southeastern. During 2008 VSOE still used Folkestone Harbour with its last train travelling on 13 November, and a number of rail tours visited the branch. Advertised as the last train, a steam hauled rail tour visited the branch on 14 March 2009. Reliant on closure of the line, a proposed Folkestone Harbour and Seafront Master plan included plans to demolish the viaduct to make way for a new marina. An association opposing the closure was formed, with the primary aim of gaining control of the branch either through purchase or a lease with an option to buy. The group, called the Remembrance Line Association proposes turning it into a mainline connected heritage railway, a 'Leaving for War' museum and a memorial dedicated to the troops that arrived on trains to the branch and left on ships to fight in both World War I and World War II. It also proposes hosting regular national railtours to the branch, and would permanently operate a tourist shuttle service up and down the 1in30 gradient, utilising its own rolling stock and locomotives. Further plans include a revived passenger ferry to Boulogne. On Sunday 21 December 2008 the Remembrance Line Association ran a railtour to the branch using the Southern Railway preserved diesel electric Class 201 No. 1001. On 20 March 2009 Network Rail announced they had begun the formal process to close the line and station on cost grounds, having redeveloped Folkestone West with new waiting facilities for the VSOE passengers As I work on the railways and have a keen interest in Railway architecture it is very sad to think that this beautiful station might not be around for very much longer. I recognised a lot of its features from the Station I work at, and it felt like I had travelled back in time when I stepped onto that platform. You could almost imagine the romance of the Orient Express waiting at the station to whisk people away in style. And now for the pictures Good advice The Signal Box The Station itself Some of the old stairs Old and some new signalling equipment All the is left of the old tracks The Swing Bridge And now for a few Shots around the Harbour All in all it was a good day. Thanks to Oldie68 for giving up his time and showing me around.
  4. Myself and my friend D60 decided to go and have another look at Folkestone harbour, at least this time I had someone with a decent camera in tow. A little about the station: A branch line was built in 1844 leaving the main line at Folkestone Junction and was double tracked ending with a viaduct across the harbour itself. In 1847 a swing bridge allowed the line to reach the southern pier and in 1848 the line was passed by the Board of Trade for passenger use. The line was electrified at the same time as the main line during the "Kent Coast Electrification - Stage 2" in June 1961, and passenger trains were formed of Electric multiple units. Freight services were withdrawn on 17 August 1968. In 1994, the opening of the Channel Tunnel led to the majority of ferry operators moving to other ports in the South East, with the result that only two services per day were arriving at Folkestone Harbour, to connect with the Hoverspeed SeaCat services. When these were moved to Ramsgate, Folkestone Harbour the station closed to ordinary rail traffic in 2001. I really like this place, the only downside is the security, if you remain on the station/peir, all is good, but stray and he gets all upset Anyway, here are a few pics that D60 took. The more modern end of the station: The original part of the station used mainly for freight when in use: And the end of the Harbour wall:
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