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Found 381 results

  1. "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  2. OK, I said on the other thread I would add the older pics of B Block. I also have ones from admin the year before as well. No point boring with history yada yada as it was on the last thread. Visited with DK and IO a couple of times. Admin: DSC02755 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Where admin used to be DSC05467 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC02713 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Window DSC02724 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Large Ward DSC02731 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Side Room DSC02733 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Top of the Stairs DSC02736 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Theatre DSC02741 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Little Room with lovely Window DSC02744 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The Dark Ward DSC02747 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Map DSC02750 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External DSC02754 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr B Block: Looking out to A Block DSC05427 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Festering mounds of Pigeon Shit DSC05428 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward DSC05429 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr 'That' Doll DSC05431 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stuff DSC05445 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr TTW DSC05452 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Empoty Room DSC05458 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The O2 Can DSC05462 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Chair DSC05463 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Klaus Wunderlich DSC05469 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Retro DSC05470 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr One Last External DSC05475 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  3. Ok, first post on here, so hope you enjoy. Just a small explore from middle of last year but an interesting little one one nonetheless. The Royal Victoria closed bit by bit over the last few years, finally becoming empty last year. Each time we pitched up there was always something still active so we accidentally left it a bit too long without checking. Big mistake, the neds burnt half the place to the ground and a sh!tload was demod to make it safe. Anyway, we managed to explore a good but of it but only took photos of the main block. The old Victorian building despite looking externally brilliant - has been so modernised inside there is no hall anymore - just a bunch of admin rooms. Enough babbling - on with the pics Main Entrance _DSC2237 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Inside the Main Entrance _DSC2229 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Staircase _DSC2228 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Sink anyone? _DSC2227 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward _DSC2224 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spotless Ward _DSC2222 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spine Corridor _DSC2221 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Mural _DSC2216 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Bed _DSC2214 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Smashed Ward and Bed _DSC2205 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External _DSC2239 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  4. This one has been long in the making and a good way to end 2017. I've been to the newer bit more times than I care to admit, however the older bit had alluded me for a long time. After multiple visits and too many fails to count we finally managed it with a bit of good timing and dash of good luck. I'd heard that it isn't going to be too long till the place is getting flattened so it was a bit of a now or never explore. History "In 1899, Sutton Cottage Hospital officially opened its doors to the public. At the time, the hospital housed just six beds, and operated from two semi-detached cottages in Bushy Road, Sutton. As the population of Sutton grew, so too did the hospital. In 1902, the hospital moved to a new site, which consisted of four small wards, an administrative block and contained a total of 12 beds. It was at this point that the hospital became known as Sutton Hospital. In 1930, the hospital began the expansion process again, this time with a purpose-built clinic at the current site. In 1931, the new hospital was officially opened. When the National Health Service (NHS) was implemented in 1948, the hospital was incorporated into the St Helier group. The hospital continued to receive support from voluntary activity and charitable organisations. By 1950, further beds for inpatients were desperately needed and two further wards were added. Late in 1957, a new outpatients and pharmacy was added to the complex. By now, people were beginning to live longer and the increasing number of elderly people requiring care was putting added pressure on the hospital. A new geriatric rehabilitation unit was opened in 1959. In 1983, a district day surgery unit was opened, meaning that patients could be treated and discharged within the same day. During 1990, the hospital underwent further improvements, and a work began on building an orthopaedic surgery. Patients first arrived for treatment here in January 1991." There were 3 blocks, Block A, B and C. >Block A is filled with half the pigeon population of Sutton and is truly vile. I might eventually get round to doing it properly, but its not an appealing one! >Block B is well decayed, but still has a quite a few things left inside and isn't too disgusting. The best one IMO. >Block C is very clean apart from a bit of graffiti but is empty and boring. We spent about 30 minutes in here but the camera never came out the bag. Block B is the only one worth doing really IMO. The Explore Visited with Brewtal and Prettyvacant71. A morning adventure that went without too many hiccups. We nipped into Block C first but quickly realised it wasn't very interested and elected to go to Block B instead as I'd heard it was the 'best' bit. Its got some fantastic decay but isn't totally trashed or smashed up. It's got a some nice original features still remaining. You could see where they had cleared some of the pigeon droppings using large sheets, but there was still enough in certain parts to warrant breaking out the dust mask for a less pleasant areas. A nice explore and a good end to a busy year of exploring. Hopefully 2018 brings more great explores! Photos
  5. The old children´s hospital was opened in the 1960s when it was relocated from the original building, which was built around the turn of the century. Personally, visiting the old children´s hospital felt very special to me, as I, a premature baby, had to spent the first weeks of my life in this facility - on the top floor and high above the rooftops of my native town. Of course, my memories of this stay can´t even be described as "vague", as I have none at all. Yet, my exploration of this place remains special to me. I really enjoyed the view across the city - consciously this time and probably as one of the last ones who received this opportunity.
  6. Quite a big place this one with some great decay throughout. Spent a good few hours round here enjoying a relaxed explore. Some parts of the building are worse than others .There has also been some vandalism and shit graff left behind. Not enough to spoil the over all feel of the place though. And like I said, the decay is awesome. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Our Lady’s Hospital first opened its doors in 1868 and was then known as Ennis District Lunatic Asylum. For 134 years it continued to operate on the same site as a mental hospital and indeed until the 1950s very little changed in the manner in which it was run. The hospital was one of the largest public buildings in County Clare and was both a large employer and purchaser of goods from local suppliers.It played an important role in the economic life of Ennis, especially in earlier years when jobs were scarce and pensionable positions were highly prized. Wards were very overcrowded with up to 70 beds per room, with only inches between. It closed in 2002 and there are currently no plans for its development. . . . . . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157662358523548/with/37531708144/
  7. France Hospital Plaza - december 2016

    This building used to be a monastery but in the first World War it was turned into an emergency hospital for soldiers who fought in the trenches. Many Belgian soldiers were brought into care here, which explains why the ' don't spit on the floor" sign is both in French and English. We came here on a chilly winters day in December. I loved how the warm sunlight supported the nice colours in the building. It's also the first location in which i stripped down to take a selfie, to find out later on, loads of other explorers had been there on the same day. this could had turned out very awkward 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Thanks for watching.
  8. UK Derelict Hospital

    Abandoned and decayed. One of the most interesting place I've visited with exciting building structure, combined with decaying details. Shame about the place is about to get knocked down. An experience to remember. https://www.facebook.com/manny.teh/media_set?set=a.1945695755495938.1073741854.100001665983033&type=3&pnref=story
  9. Other Miner hospital in Hungary

    The abandoned mining hospital, located in Hungary, dates back to the nineteenth century. A coal mining company in 1898 began construction of a small mining hospital, which began operations with the approval of the Minister of the Interior on December 17, 1900. The hospital. According to descriptions, it has been adapted for 50 beds. There was a surgical, internal and infectious department. The building was full of lighting, sewage and bathrooms. The facility was one of the most modern hospitals at the time. The care was extended to include the epidemic (1909) and the pharmacy. In 1911 the number of residents increased to such an extent that the hospital was no longer able to meet this number. In 1911, a new hospital was started, which started operating in 1912. The necessary buildings were built in the courtyard of the hospital (morgue, a section of the hospital, a chapel, a house for doctors and nuns, a horse farm). The three-storey hospital had 129 beds for patients who were placed in 23 units. The mining company was responsible for maintaining the hospital, covering all personnel and all costs. Despite many years of change, the mining hospital developed with the development of mining. The hospital was relocated in 1998 to a new hospital complex. Hungarians are tightly attached to the old building and have been trying to save one of the oldest buildings in the city for several years. It was sold for approximately HUF 276 million ($ 1 million). I am planning a rehabilitation center, an oncological center and a nursing home. I invite to visit my site on facebook. Link to the full album: https://www.facebook.com/pg/urbexdestruction/photos/?tab=album&album_id=143007552995318 [/url]
  10. During a Italian trip waaaay back in 2016, I visited this rather lovely Manicomio in the heart of a seaside Italian City, it was impressive to say the least. Huge stairs, huge windows, high ceilings, but sadly rather empty, but I enjoyed it enough to go back this year with Baroness Von DerpBangers. Thanks for looking
  11. Moreton in the Marsh District Hospital - September 2017 Visited a few weeks ago with Mookster and two other non-members for one of their bithdays. It was a very relaxed explore as you'd expect; pretty trashed and stripped of most things, but still retained some photographic merit. We were caught on the way out by a friendly and incredibly confused security guard who didn't really have an awful lot to say and just smiled a lot! Moreton-in-Marsh Cottage Hospital was a small Victorian hospital built in the Cotswolds. It's closure in 2012 came about after a new much larger facility opened just outside the village. Moreton Cottage Hospital was built in 1873 by private subscription. Lord Redesdale gave the land at the north end of the town in Back Ends. The first small stone building had seven beds, but this was extended in 1879 following a £3,000 request by Dr. William Sands Cox, the founder of Queen's College, Birmingham. In 1886 The Joseph Phipps Charity donated a further £1,000 stock to the hospital in and an operating theatre was built in 1900. By 1919 the hospital was extended further, when £2,000 was given to the hospital, and again in 1935. Moreton in the Marsh Cottage Hospital; which had been managed by trustees, eventually came under the authority of the Banbury and District Hospital Management Committee after 1946. There are a several buildings within the site, the main hospital and a much more modernised outpatients clinic. After the hospitals closure, bits of the hospital have been used by a prop hire company as storage but now the whole site remains disused. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157686204703971
  12. History Kingseat Psychiatric Hospital is located in Karaka, a small rural area south of the city of Auckland. The construction of the hospital, which derives its name from a hospital in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, began in 1929, when twenty patients from a nearby mental health institution were sent to the site equipped with ten shovels and twelve wheelbarrows. Following a visit to the United Kingdom, Dr. Gray (the Director-General of the Mental Health Division of the Health Department at the time) felt that it was a good idea to open a sister hospital in New Zealand. Kingseat Hospital opened in 1932. Thereafter, the facility continued to grow and several new buildings were constructed on the site, including a two-storey nurse’s home. By the beginning of 1947, there were over eight hundred patients at the hospital. However, in 1968 a number of nurses at the facility went on strike due to ill treatment and high stress levels. This forced the hospital administration to invite unemployed people and volunteers to assist within the hospital grounds with general domestic tasks. Eventually, the dispute with the nurses was partially resolved and, in the end, normal service resumed. Nevertheless, it should be noted that more nurses are said to have died at Kingseat than patients, due to the high stress levels caused by working in such an emotionally, and physically, draining environment. As one member of staff reported after the closure of Kingseat: … I worked here as a teenager, it was a horrible hospital with dinosaur thinking and a lot of what they say is true. How they treated the elderly and mentally handicapped people back then was horrible… It was horrible living in the nurses ‘home’, it was horrible working in the huge main kitchen and it was worse working in the separate units. The eating hall looked like a disaster swept through after each feeding… There was never enough hands to help the extremely handicapped eat, no medications to avoid being scratched or attacked… I cried with relief to learn this hospital has closed. The gardens were kept beautiful, with its tennis courts and pool, but what was behind closed door sucks… I cried looking at the elderly demented people being held here, their only crime was not being of sound mind and having no living relations… Despite its underlying problems, further development occurred in 1973, when a therapeutic pool was constructed. It was opened by the then-Mayorness of Auckland, Mrs. Barbara Goodman. Four years later a larger, main swimming pool was installed at the hospital. As the hospital continued to grow, various externals sites formed a connection with the facility, such as various alcoholics groups that sent patients to be treated for their drinking addictions. The hospital also started to accept voluntary patients between the 1980s and 1990s. However, in 1996 South Auckland Health sold Kingseat Hospital, following the government’s decision to replace ongoing hospitalisation of mentally ill patients with community care and rehabilitation units. Similar to the UK, New Zealand went through a period of deinstitutionalisation which involved housing mentally ill patients within the everyday community, and this resulted in most of the country’s asylums and institutions being closed down. Subsequently, Kingseat Hospital closed in 1999, after the final patients were relocated to a mental health unit in Otara. The last sixteen patients were not sent into the community because they were not suitable for rehabilitation. The final patients were moved to an old Spinal Unit complex that was surrounded on all sides by electrified fences. It is reported that local residents of Otara were concerned for the safety of their families if a patient did manage to escape from the secure unit. In contrast, South Auckland Health argued that such fears were unwarranted and unjustified, and that the secure unit’s location would allow the patients to be closer to their own families, whereas Kingseat had been much more isolated. After Kingseat Hospital closed, it was considered as a potential site for a new prison. It is estimated that it would have been able to hold up to six hundred inmates. However, it was decided not to redevelop the facility due to the buildings on the site being potentially earthquake-prone. Since 2000, then, a large proportion of the hospital has simply been left to decay. The rest of the site is lived in by members of the Tainui tribe and other New Zealanders. Since 2004 over two hundred people have come forward to file complaints against the national government for mistreatment and abuse during the 1960s and 70s. Many of those people are former patients and nurses. The site has also gained a reputation for being one of the most haunted places in New Zealand. According to the television programme, Ghost Hunt, the most common apparition seen at the hospital is the ‘Grey Nurse’ – a former member of staff who is reported to have committed suicide. However, despite the spooky problem, a development company has proposed plans to transform the site into a countryside living estate with four hundred and fifty homes. The plans would ensure that the original buildings and grounds would be preserved. Our Version of Events We’ll keep this brief, since the explore itself was pretty uneventful (it was still very interesting, but more of a chilled walk-around). To begin with, we met up in Auckland with another explorer who runs the Derelict NZ Facebook page, and from there decided to head out of the city to visit an old psychiatric hospital. Apparently, the architecture was very different to other stuff you tend to find in New Zealand, so it seemed well worth a visit. In other words, it meant we were going to find some bricks! We rocked up sometime in the afternoon and parked the cars in an old parking bay that was presumably part of the hospital. As we got out, we were surprised at how lively the old site was. There were people walking outdoors, children playing on the grass and other people doing menial tasks outside their houses. However, as noted above, parts of the site are lived on, so in hindsight this shouldn’t have been odd at all. Doing our best to blend in, we crossed a large, well-kept, grass field. We were heading for the abandoned looking buildings where there were fewer people. At the first dirty looking derp, we had to wait patiently for several minutes for a very unusual guy to continue on his way. He appeared to be walking his cat, and was talking on his phone to no one… It would appear, then, that not all the patients have left the facility. After a few odd glances at each other, though, the guy eventually wandered off into some nearby bushes, and that was the last we saw of him. Accessing the buildings wasn’t particularly difficult, and it’s possible to get inside at least several of them. Most are largely stripped, as the photos show, but some do have a few unique features, such as the cells we found inside a former ward. Unfortunately, the old high secure section of the site has been torched, so there’s not much to look at inside there. The hardcore fence outside it is still in situ though, so that was something interesting to see. The final thing we found that’s worth mentioning is the old therapeutic pool. It was much different to any other we’ve seen before. After the pool we headed back to the cars as there wasn’t much else to see. It was time to crack on and find something else to explore. Explored with Nillskill, Nadia and Derelict NZ. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 27: 28: 29:
  13. History The year is 1918 and the cold, motionless, body of Michael Dravitzki is being moved into the New Plymouth hospital morgue. His small frame is covered with a white sheet. It is believed the young boy has fallen victim to a very potent strain of the Spanish influenza virus. The medical staff at the hospital are overwhelmed with the increasing number of patients who are suffering from headaches, sore throats, breathing problems and high fevers. Many fear for their own lives as, day after day, patients and staff begin to dribble red froth from their lips and fall into a state of unconsciousness. Once this happens it is not long before each of their faces gradually darken purple, and then brown before they finally die. Many of the patients had been in good health and going about their everyday business only hours few hours ago, but now they are gravely ill; no one has ever seen anything like it before. To help contain the deadly virus and free up beds for those who desperately need them, the dead are swiftly removed from the hospital, to join the young boy, Michael. There is mass panic spreading throughout the facility and New Plymouth as people fear today could be their last; in many ways, the fear is just as potent as the virus itself. Despite the odds, however, Michael lived (up until he was 89 in fact), along with many other New Zealanders. An elderly lady whose job was to assess the bodies in the morgue later discovered that he was still breathing. All in all, though, 8,600 died from the virus (of those 2,160 were Maori). It is thought that the severe form of influenza arrived on the Royal Mail liner Niagara on the 12th October 1918. According to witnesses, even though there were several cases of the influenza on board, two key figures, Prime Minister William Massey and his deputy, Sir Joseph Ward, refused to be quarantined. Therefore, the ship is said to have docked in Auckland and this led to the subsequent release of the virus. However, alternative sources suggest that the case of influenza on board the ship was assessed by health authorities as being ‘ordinary’ and the same as that which already existed in the city, and that Massey and Ward took no part in making quarantine decisions. They argued, instead, that it was the war that caused the deadly pandemic. Yet, regardless of the conflicting stories and the uncertainty about the true cause, one thing is certain and that is that the pandemic that hit New Zealand was very real. Barrett Street hospital in New Plymouth – the major city of the Taranaki Region – played a major role in trying to treat the unfortunate victims of the outbreak. In point of fact, Barrett Street Hospital had originally been built in the 1860s to tackle increasing cases of typhus fever, scarlet fever and diphtheria in New Plymouth. It is for this reason the facility became one of the largest in New Zealand; it had more, equipment, suitable medical supplies, beds and staff to take care of patients. In the end, the hospital treated thousands of people and managed to save a large proportion of them. Of the 81,000 people in the area, only 635 died between October and December 1918. The number of fatalities could have been considerably higher without the hospital and its dedicated staff. After the flu pandemic, Barrett Street Hospital continued to grow and serve the general public. The first major addition to the site was a home for the nurses. This was constructed in 1905; however, another storey had to be added a year later because it was not large enough to accommodate the expanding staff. By 1916, though, the standards in the nurses’ home were deemed wholly inadequate and substandard. This resulted in a new accommodation block being constructed in 1918. The history on the nurses’ home, which still stands today, can be found in a supplementary report. Following the successful construction of the new onsite accommodation, the hospital expanded further as new offices, an out-patients block, a dedicated children’s ward and a tuberculosis ward were added to the site. Nonetheless, the ‘glory days’ at Barrett Street Hospital were numbered. In 1950 the Hospital Board revealed plans for a new, larger, hospital that would be located in Westown, as the existing site could no longer be extended due to the detection of unstable foundations. The hospital very gradually wound things down for the next forty-six years, and, in the end, the original hospital did not actually close until 1996; only by the end of the twentieth century was it completely empty of medical supplies and equipment and sold to the Government for $1 million. It was reported that many people, including staff and nearby residents, were sad to see the eventual closure of their historic centre of medicine. But, many of those people did also admit that the old hospital was getting too old and worn, and that the corridors and wards were too large which meant finding your way across the premises entailed a considerable amount of walking. Surprisingly, though, despite these unpopular features, new life was injected into the hospital as a number of legal (New Plymouth School of Gymnastics and Carrington Funeral Services) and illegal (squatters) tenants moved in. The year is 2012 and several heavy knocks coming from the front door have woken a group of squatters. Bleary eyed and slightly hungover from last night’s cans of Tui, several squalid-looking individuals take a minute for their surroundings to come into focus. Most of the windows have been shattered and the glass is strewn over the floor. A mixture of psychedelic colours sting their eyes as they struggle hard to open them. It’s the graffiti, which mostly consists of scruffily written names in red and green spray paint that is scrawled over all the walls in the room. One of the group coughs, retching as the taste of beer and vomit suddenly rises and stings the back of her throat. The glass on the floor crunches loudly as she struggles to stand up right. Three more heavy knocks ring out loudly throughout the room, followed by a loud, authoritative, voice. “Come on, open up. We know you’re in there. We’re Ministry officials, open the door!” The door opens and the Ministry officials enter the foul-smelling room. The hospital is to be evacuated. According to recent surveys, the entire site has been deemed earthquake prone. In addition, a large amount of asbestos has been discovered throughout the premises, making it extremely dangerous to enter any of the buildings. One by one the illegal tenants are rounded up and kicked out of the hospital, along with the gymnastic school and funeral company who had been using the old morgue to store their bodies. They are warned not to return, otherwise the police will be called. Just as the officials are about to leave, everyone present is informed that the fate of Barrett Street Hospital is imminent demolition. Our Version of Events Our journey from Midhurst continued up to New Plymouth, where we decided to check out the historic Barrett Street Hospital.It took hours to get there, but bangin’ tunes and beer kept us going. When we finally arrived, the sun was shining and the temperature was twenty degrees, so things were looking good. It was time to get the pasty guns out and set up some tripods and cameras! Looking at the building from the outside, it looked as though it was going to be a right doddle getting inside. We were feeling confident. Several hours later, however, and we were still trying to find a way inside. If anything, we can say we were persistent… In the time we’d been there, we’d already bumped into a group of New Zealand’s equivalent of inbred chavs, two ladies (former nurses) who wanted to gain access to the old nurse’s home and a random guy who was checking out the local attractions as he’d just moved to the area. Perhaps we were a little too confident when we boldly told them, “we’ll find a way inside”, despite the metal sheeting that was covering every possible way of getting into the hospital. In the end, though, we did in fact manage to gain access to the main hospital, after failing miserably to get into the nurse’s site. Access was incredibly innovative and a wee bit ballsy to say the least. But desperate times call for desperate measures. Once inside the good old smell of rot and damp filled our nostrils. No doubt there was a bit of asbestos in there too, spicing the whole experience up that little bit more. Nice and content we’d finally managed to worm our way inside we began the usual activity of walking around aimlessly. When you think about it, it’s a bit weird really, waking around an entirebuilding for no other purpose than to see its rooms and take photographs. Nevertheless, this is exactly what we did, and this led us to discover the largest corridor any of us have ever seen. This thing was fucking massive, and it can be blamed for wasting many of our valuable minutes. At one point, we did think about giving up trying to find the end, but after thinking about it we decided that we might as well reach the other side to tell everyone about what it was like walking down the longest corridor EVER. As you might imagine, it was much like every other corridor. It had lots of adjoining doors, lightbulbs and terrible wallpaper. After walking around a good proportion of the hospital, we came to the conclusion that each of the wards were identical so we decided we weren’t going to get any shots that differed from the ones we’d already taken. In other words, it was all becoming a little samey. With that, we headed for our innovative entrance/exit. On the way, though, we chatted to one another once again about the old nurse’s home, and how it would be a shame to miss out on seeing it. It seemed like it was worth another shot at getting inside, especially since it’s the most historic building on the site and its future is uncertain. As we recalled, although there are talks to try and save it, based on its heritage value, there is no firm plan in place to guarantee its survival. Explored with Nillskill and Bane. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  14. History St. Peter’s Hospital is an NHS general district hospital in Chertsey, England. It is located on the Metropolitan Green Belt, between Woking and Chertsey. Originally, the hospital was built to serve casualties of the Second World War. Since that time, however, the facility has been rebuilt, developed and extended several times to include additional services such as a maternity ward, a new theatre complex and a clinic area. What is more, the main part of the hospital itself now has over 400 beds and a wide range of acute care services. As for the mortuary, it was constructed in the 1940s on the very edge of the site. It was in service up until April 2009, when it was decided that the building was too small to cope with the increase in cadavers. A new, larger, morgue was built closer to the central hospital. Our Version of Events It was three minutes before midnight, and we were racing down a brightly lit corridor. At the end there was a large, heavy, blast door, and we were trying to reach it. A volley of red laser beams followed us, ricocheting off the walls as we legged it. “Halt, stay where you are”, someone yelled. Not likely I thought, as I risked taking a quick glance behind me to discover that it had come from a security guard dressed entirely in white armour. There were at least eleven of them in total, all firing their blasters in our general direction. Luckily for us, though, the force was with us, or they were incredibly bad shots; either way, all of them missed us. We’d been trying to find the Millennium Falcon in Pinewood Studeos, but secca had discovered us. So now the chase was on. At the blast door, DRZ_Explorer whipped out his 1250 lumen Olight SR95S UT Intimidator which, at the push of a button, produced a long white vertical laser beam – a bit like a sword. The door was locked, so DRZ_Explorer decided to improvise. He thrust his torch into the door and set about tearing a hole in it. The rest of us watched, ducking occasionally as flashes of red erupted above us. Amazingly, even though we were motionless now, the guys in the white armour continued to miss us. It was a bloody good job too, because I’m almost certain they were breaking one or two health and safety rules. Imagine if they’d actually hit us with one of those laser beams! After hacking away at the door for a few minutes, DRZ_Explorer eventually made enough of a hole for us all to squeeze through. One by one we clambered into the other side of the corridor. All safely on the other side, we yelled for DRZ_Explorer to join us. We peered back through the hole to see what the fuck he was up to. As it turned out, he was rather preoccupied, trying to fend off security. “ Using his UT Intimidator, he managed to deflect several blasts, but one caught him on his left arm. He grimaced, but continued to waved his torch around wildly, repelling all further shots. He was doing well, until a large black figure emerged among the guards. It was the site manager. He was wearing a long black cape and wielding his own 1250 lumen Olight SR95S UT Intimidator. His was red, though, and looked a lot cooler than DRZ_Explorer’s. The site manager strode forward with his free hand raised in front of him, and then, as he continued walking forward, he clenched his fist tightly. DRZ_Explorer suddenly dropped to the floor. Gasping for breath, he grasped his throat with both hands. He was being strangled by some sort of mind control trick. “Run!”, he coughed, “Run! You must get to the Millennium Falcon!” He didn’t have to tell us twice, we didn’t want to risk getting caught, so we legged it. The last thing we heard was the site manager shout, in Intergalactic lingo, was, “Summon the droids! That will flush them out”, which in hindsight probably meant, in Planet Earth English, “turn on the fucking CCTV, that’ll put a stop to these bastard trespassers!” An hour or so later, however, and we were all in St. Peter’s Morgue. It wasn’t a great end to the night, given that this place is a right shithole, but it was better than some alternatives – such as a crematorium, or Sunderland. Unsure how long we were going to be here, or what else the evening might have in store for us, we made do with wandering around heavily graffitied rooms that were filled with heaps of shit for a while. Thankfully, though, our cameras had survived our ordeal, so we were able to take a few snaps along the way. And there we have it, that’s how we’ve all ended up with another report of St. Peter’s Morgue rather than a victorious tale with the Rebel Alliance. Explored with Ford Mayhem and DRZ_Explorer. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11:
  15. A seminary in France that was later used as a medical centre and with a beautiful chapel! I think it closed within the past decade. Thanks for looking!
  16. The Blue Hospital (Nov 2014)

    Visited with a non forum member - This hospital is part of a large former military camp which was taken over by the Red Army in 1945 until they left in 1990. Since then it has sat empty, slowly decaying. In my time I've happily wandered around many abandoned places with no bother including 4 different asylums on my own but, I'm not kidding this place really gave me the creeps. Evidence on the walls of the unmistakable Soviet presence once here - Till next time....be seeing you!
  17. History The first written record of a workhouse in Hexham, which was more of a prison by contemporaneous standards, dates back to 1777. It was a relatively large establishment for its time as it was capable of housing up to fifty-five inmates. In the report it is noted that the governess was named Mrs. Hutchinson, and that she supported every pauper at the weekly rate of two shillings and six pennies (approximately twelve and a half pence in today’s currency) per head. However, following the founding of the Hexham Poor Law Union in 1836, a new Hexham Union workhouse consisting of three parallel two-storey buildings was constructed in 1839, by J. H. Morton, on the south side of Dean Street. Like most other workhouses, the daily regime was brutal and the establishment was feared by those outside of its walls (this was to deter able-bodied people from applying). Everyone, regardless of age or sex, was required to work, doing jobs that would often lead to exhaustion and ill health. What is more, the food, uniform, medical care and education tended to be inadequate, and once incarcerated inside the workhouse families were often split up and punished if they attempted to communicate with one another. The Hexham Union workhouse underwent major alterations and refurbishment in 1863, when detached schools were built. Conditions for children gradually began to improve from this point on, with an 1866 report noting that ‘the boys dig and plant the garden; the girls sew and knit’. Further development between 1880 and 1883, at a cost of £8,000, saw the construction of an administration block, a Master’s house, a dining room (the room with the murals from 1885 which may be attributed to E. Swinburne) and sick wards on the eastern end of the site. Standards within the accommodation blocks were improved, although people were still separated and divided into various classes of ‘inmate’, and the capacity was increased to accommodate 300. The finely carved stonework of the Master’s house, which is positioned just above the entranceway, still exists today. After 1930, the workhouse became Hexham Public Assistance Institution, following the abolishment of the workhouse system. As with a large number of workhouses at the time, Hexham workhouse became more of a refuge for the elderly, sick and infirm, rather than the able-bodied poor. In other words, it became a kind of municipal hospital. Nevertheless, during the Second World War part of the site was appropriated for military administrative use. After the war, though, in 1948, the site became part of Hexham General Hospital, and was used as a hospital up until 2004, when new modernised buildings were opened nearby. The hospital continued to use part of the site to store equipment and paperwork, but the rest was sold to Helen McArdle Care Ltd. and later leased to The Therapy Centre in 2013. Today, however, all of the buildings across the site have been abandoned. Since they were rendered derelict at different stages, some parts of the site have deteriorated badly on account of vandals, metal thieves and water damage. As things stand, local residents have launched complaints surrounding the poor condition of the site. Some have called for the former workhouse to be demolished as it is said to pose a risk to the general public. So far two serious plans have been proposed: one by Lidl who are interested in demolishing the site to provide space for a large supermarket, and a second by a housing company that promises to build affordable homes and private residential units for elderly people. It is rumoured, however, that the council are open to further ideas, particularly ones that look to salvage some, if not all, of the former workhouse site. Our Version of Events After hearing about a potential explore over in Hexham, we decided to go take a look. Assuming it was going to be an average sized site and that we’d be able to cover it in a few hours, we headed over late one evening after a bit of tea (not the drink). As it turned out, though, the explore was a former workhouse, so it was fucking huge. It was also a bit like a maze trying to work our way through the buildings because we had to content with locked doors, boarded windows and lots of discarded shit lying all over the place. This meant we didn’t have time to wander round the entire thing on our first visit, so we finished it off on a second trip a couple of days later. At first, despite being satisfied with the age of the building, the old workhouse proved to be a bit of a shit wander. The first few rooms we poked around in were beyond stripped. For example, even the floorboards in the corridors seemed to have been knicked! But, things started to improve once we stumbled into the middle section of the building which, as records suggest, was part of the new 1883 development. From here on in there was plenty of stuff to take photos of. We entered the dining room first and quickly discovered the old murals on the wall to our right. As for the rest of the room, it had been transformed into a medical records room, according to the sign on the door. From the dining room, we found we had to traverse across part of the roof, which was a bit of a sketchy experience as the whole thing was covered in ice. This was the only way to reach the third part of the site though. The other route was blocked by a room brimming with old zimmer-frames, mattresses, chairs and other bits of medical equipment. It’s no wonder the NHS have shortages – half of Britain’s medical apparatus is in that room. Anyway, back to the explore. We skated our way across the roof to reach a smashed opening on the other side. It led into a stairwell, and since we were quite high up from the steps we had to lower ourselves inside and drop in. The building we’d entered was noticeably different from the rest of the site, in the sense that it was fairly modern and had clearly been refurbished in recent years. But, before we could take in the surroundings any further, the pair of us heard something. It was the subtle sound of a ‘beep’. Then, two seconds later, it suddenly went ballistic, even though we’d not moved from where we were stood and couldn’t see any motion sensors. A little confused, we proceeded down the stairs to find out what the fuck was going on. As it turned out, the alarm must have been triggered by the last visitors – the fuckers who appeared to have walked around smashing the place to bits – and it seemed that no one had turned up to sort it out. The alarm continued to go off sporadically the entire time we were there anyway; it would randomly stop, then start again regardless of whether we walked past a sensor or not. What we did find amusing in all of this, though, was that the previous visitors to the site had tried to cover up some of the sensors with pieces of paper and leaflets, presumably to stop them from being detected… We spent less time in the alarmed section that we would have liked, but we did manage to get around the entire thing without anyone turning up. So we felt pretty successful in that respect. After that, however, we made a hasty exit, just to be on the safe side. We exited the same way we managed to get in, and to finish off decided to get a couple of external shots. And just in time too, or so we thought, since the police decided to rock up. Nevertheless, as it turned out they didn’t seem to be after us. Later, after having a chat with a local, we learnt that police presence has been increased in the area because of vandal and thieves and subsequent complaints from residents. So, rather than attending to the alarm, they were probably just doing the routine rounds to keep the local populace happy. Explored with Meek-Kune-Do. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  18. History Wheelbirks is a small rural part of Northumbria, located to the south of Hadrian’s Wall. According to several historical books, there have been farmsteads in the area since the 16th century. It was David Richardson, though, who would have the greatest influence in transforming the area. Richardson, who was a Quaker and the owner of some of the largest tanneries in the country, moved to the area in 1882. The family has a long history as tanners, tracing as far back as the mid-16th century to a site based at Great Ayton, Cleveland, so they had a considerable amount of wealth and influence. In 1902, Richardson started work on replacing the original farmhouse at Wheelbirks with a Restrained Gothic style farmhouse and several small cottages. By 1911, the area was completely transformed, having changed from a small farmstead into a fully-fledged estate. Further development was prompted a few months after completion following an outbreak of tuberculosis (TB) inside Richardson’s tanneries. During the early 1900s, for instance, the works located at Elswick were reported to have a high incidence of the disease. The sanatorium itself is a cruciform construction of steel-reinforced concrete, white engineering brick and glass. It was designed to appear as if it is standing on stilts in a hollow; three bridges attached to the main entrances of the building helped to create the illusion. The design of the structure, which is reportedly American-based, and its chosen setting is said to have comprised a fresh-air method of treatment whereby patients would be surrounded by countryside and a clean, unpolluted environment. Unfortunately, Richardson never witnessed the completion of the sanatorium because it remained unfinished at the time of his death in 1913. In the end, the building was never used to treat TB sufferers because developments in antibiotics led to important changes in how TB was treated, to the extent that the use of isolated hospitals was rendered unnecessary. Today, the sanatorium is in a dilapidated condition. The interior is badly damaged and almost completely stripped, and the outside is clearly showing its age. In addition, one of the entrance bridges appears to be missing; there is some evidence that one existed on the western side of the building. Despite its condition, there is evidence that a local farmer has commandeered the space, using it as a storage site for various pieces of farm equipment and a random collection of boats. Our Version of Events Prior to visiting the Wheelbirks TB Sanatorium, we were warned that some stealthy moves would be required as there is an active farm overlooking the premises. With this is mind, we parked several miles away and decided to have a wander through the woods, to approach the building from the rear. Taking the necessary precautions, we camo’d up, slapping on a few streaks of black paint across our cheeks that we happened to have lying around for full effect. The walk that followed was itself quite pleasurable as we navigated our way along the side of a stream that runs close by the sanatorium. If anything, with tripods in our arms it felt a bit like we were stalking a predator (the extra-terrestrial kind, not a paedophile). Thankfully we weren’t, though, because if one really had been skulking around alongside us our attempt to fend it off would have been a very shit addition to the sequels. The building appeared all of a sudden, lurking behind a thin cluster of trees just ahead. It was just as everyone has described it: American. It was certainly different, but I can’t say it struck us as the most aesthetically pleasing building in England. However, before we could stand in awe for any longer, as we were peering out from the treeline, we suddenly noticed that the pre-warnings about the farm next door and there being lots of activity were quite accurate. The farm was a veritable hive of activity, with cars coming and going and a hardened sentry equipped with a set of heavy-duty binoculars sitting on the roof. What is more, just ahead in the next field there appeared to be a shooting party. It wasn’t very clear what they were shooting at, but they all looked the business with their flat caps, tweed jackets and 4x4s. Taking care not to get shot, we crept up to the old sanatorium waving a fresh Kleenex tissue for good measure. From there, choosing a point of entry wasn’t particularly difficult as all the doors were either missing or wide open. Once inside, it was immediately apparent that local farmers and the nearby ice cream parlour are using the site as a makeshift storage facility. Unfortunately, they don’t seem to be storing any ice creams in the big freezer though. That’s right, we checked. The main floor, which I would assume is the ground floor (the design of the building is a bit odd having been constructed in a hollow), is filled with bicycles, boats and farm equipment. Downstairs is being used in a similar way, although a lot of the gear down there appears to be quite dated. As for the upper floors of the building, they are absolutely fucked. With the sheer number of holes in the walls, it would appear as though the guys over in the field are in much need of some target practice. There is only really one room that might be of interest to anyone passing through, and that is the one filled with old-ish whisky bottles and newspapers. We decided to call it a day after taking a quick look around the upstairs rooms. There wasn’t much left to see, and the group of would-be mercenaries in the field opposite seemed to be packing up to leave. The first few land rovers were already leaving the field and forming a Mad Max style convoy. The last farmer who was closing the gate even seemed to have a large speaker system mounted on the back of his Toyota Hilux. We ducked beneath a window ledge for a moment as the convoy roared past us, then when everything went quiet again headed back towards the woods to face our trek back to the car. Explored with LightSaber. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  19. Back again for my third visit! This one was definitely the best and as such the most worth sharing on here. This place is huge - I'm certain there's many bits that I haven't seen yet. Visited with @TheVampiricSquid @Biebs and @MrObvious I'll spare you the history as it's very easy to find and cut straight to the explore story... Well basically I was wanting to do another revisit for a long time, but never quite got round to it. It had been 11 months since my last visit, so I was itching to get back - especially seeing as it was so much fun last time playing hide and seek with the Police and such! I got chatting to Squid one day, he asked me if I was free and I just ended up going for it. It was one of those spur-of-the-moment, opportunist situations and the whole thing unfolded beautifully and we ended up having a great night! I reckon we must have spent about 14 hours on site in total, give or take an hour or so when we got pinched, grabbed a kebab and went back in again! Shots I got were a bit mixed in quality, but different nonetheless... First stop, the labs... Having a look at the gym on the way through. It was all pretty stripped compared to my first and second visit. God knows what it's like now. Scanner. Onto the roof. At this point in time the explore is taking it's toll a bit and we're all getting rather drowsy, so we go to the "Chill Room", have a couple of beers and start pondering whether to get some shut eye. Then Biebs mentions the X-Ray area and we decide to march down there and get some more shots. We crash out soon after that and wake up feeling reasonably fresh. Video: More general pics can be found on my Flickr. On our way out we bump into Squid's secca nemesis Brian who remarks "I suppose you think you're clever do ya!?". I was hoping for more of a confrontation for the LULz, but to my disappointment he just stood there and gave us the evils Fantastic night on the whole. Many thanks to Squid, Mr.Obvious and Biebs for showing me around and helping me out Thanks for looking.
  20. Germany Clinicum Paralyticum April '16

    Finally, my third visit was successful! A nice little loophole down a light shaft enabled us to enter the maze of corridors... The typical "hospital smell" is in the air. Stale air, mixed with the smell of sanitizers. Involuntarily, I hold my breath. After all the years of abandonment, that smell in particular makes the former hospital life tangible. We start exploring the bowles of the giant. Blinking lights and silent noises accompany us. Suddenly - in the cellar - the predominantly silence is killed by a comparetively deafening noise - the airing is still working very well. All these aspects still revive the old complex simply add to the haunting atmosphere. Personally, I permanently expect stumbling across a doctor, a nurse or a patient around every corner. Yet, nothing happens. All the people who once filled the walls with life are gone long time ago. Only the noises of the building, which is still kept alive like a last patient, are still there. It´s still working in its bowles, although its days have already been counted. Consequently, the heat in the former and still working heating plant hits you as soon as you open the door. Here, too - noise and blinking lights as far as the eye can see. A bizarre view in a building, which no longer serves any purpose. Also very strange to feel is the severe difference in temperature in the former pathology department with attached dissecting room. In comparison to other parts of the hospital, it´s very cold in there. For some, the journey ended here once. Here, in the cold and pitch-dark cellar at least our journey ends for the day. We take some more photos and leave the coldness of the basement through the heat of the boiler room. At the end of the day, find ourselves in the pleasant spring sun and breathe fresh air. [/url]
  21. Build in the late 80's, "The Hopital Batman" is lost in the middle of the french campaign... Due to a huge deficit - 5 millions euros -, this reeducation center was closed in 2009. It was suppose to be renovated and to create a extension of 70 beds. All the employes and the patients was moved in another hospital in a bigger town.
  22. USA Kentucky Mental Hospital Power Plant

    This ominous building once served as the power plant for the Central State Mental Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  23. The History Clayton Hospital was opened in 1854; after Thomas Clayton, a former city mayor donated buildings to the Wakefield general dispensary, an organisation set up to provide healthcare for the poor. It provided much needed healthcare long before the NHS was formed. The hospital was later abandoned in 2012. Specialist eye services have moved from Clayton to the more modern Pinderfields Hospital and its sexual health services will be based at King Street Walk-in Centre. The Explore Explored with @plod and a member from 28. (shot out to the 3 kids we also met there ) It's a shame to see that the place is in such a state, I tried to make the best of it despite not having much battery power left in my camera from the previous explores of the day. The main building was pretty disorientating so I'm sure I missed some of it but I'm quite satisfied with what I did get to see, given how trashed the place is anyway. We were interested in finding the morgue and we managed to locate it but it was very well boarded up, and there is anti-climb paint covering the fences that surround it as our friend managed to find As we were searching for a way in to another building in the center of the site, the security guard showed up while @plod was down the tunnels looking for a way in from there. Security gave us 2 minutes to get him out before the police are called but plod had wandered so far in that he couldn't hear us calling him Luckily he showed up in time after no luck finding anything; the security guard wasn't happy but he gave us no trouble as he didn't really seem to know what he was doing.
  24. Gledhow Grove, built in the 1820's was designed by architect John Clark in Greek Revival style. Chapel Allerton Hospital was opened in may 1927 by HRH Princess Mary, It was run by the Ministry of Pensions and cost £130,000. It replaced the old military hospital at Becketts Park in Leeds, catering for patients who had been injured in the Great War, specializing in the fitting of appliances and false limbs to war veterans. The hospital closed in 1994, the old hospital buildings were demolished and the Grade II listed mansion has been left derelict with new housing built in the grounds. In early 2008, filing cabinets containing patients' details were found inside the basement of the hospital after it had already been sold on. As most of this place has already been converted I only got to explore the mansion part of it. What's unique about this building is how different the layout is to your average hospital, and it still had lots of character despite being so wrecked. Some of the floors that we saw above had completely fallen through with the entire carpet hanging down, probably one of the most far-gone places I've seen.
  25. History “This is somewhere that has been on the market for ten years with little or no interest… It has suffered terribly from vandalism and theft over the years and is likely to sit like this for another ten years if permission isn’t granted…” (Ed Alder, Regional and Land Planning Manager). Homelands Hospital was built on the outskirts of the small village of Helmington Row in 1903, as a fever hospital to treat diseases such as tuberculosis, typhus and smallpox. Its isolated location was ideal, and specifically selected to prevent the spread of disease to larger towns and cities. The location was also deemed suitable owing to the fresh air rural surroundings yield; during the early 20th century one of the favoured methods for treating lung diseases was to use nature as a form of therapy, to move patients away from the smoke and smog of industrious cities. A number of trees were planted around the buildings after the initial construction of the hospital, to increase the supply of oxygen and create a more picturesque setting. Today, the vast majority of the trees have preservation orders, protecting them against any planned demolition of the site. In later years, the facility was modernised and redeveloped into a general health care unit. Although the original buildings adhere to a municipal design criterion, the interior features of the buildings were altered extensively; all of the surfaces were covered by more hygienic materials that were approved by health and safety guidelines. Unfortunately, the hospital was closed in 2004. Owing to its rural location and the construction of much larger general health care units in bigger cities, Homelands hospital was deemed superfluous. Since 2004 the facility has remained derelict. In spite of the site costing £20,000 a year to maintain, and although several applications have been submitted to demolish the existing buildings and build houses, Durham County Council have, to date, rejected all plans. The main reason for the stalemated negotiations are down to local residents who have, so far, objected to every development proposal. Many have raised concerns around the trees and potential drainage issues. For councillors, there were further concerns surrounding the lack of affordable housing that would be generated from each of the suggested projects. Our Version of Events A couple of hours before visiting Homelands Hospital we did a little research to see if it had ever been done before. As it turned out, a couple of other reports had been posted back in 2011. To our disappointment, the buildings looked a bit fucked back then, and it also looked as though there wasn’t much inside them. However, since we’d already planned to head over that way, we thought there was no harm checking the place out… Having said that, the reports we did find all suggested that this was a hard place to get in and out of successfully – without getting caught anyway. According to one source, the place ‘[was] PIR censored up to the eyeballs, and set to a silent alarm’. With such censoring in place, we took a moment to remind one another not to use any bad language while out on this explore – after all, the wireless PIRs must have been place to supress all such activity, and we’d taken note that there was a silent alarm to try and catch us out. On top of this, ‘6-8 officers with 3 riot vans and the dog section’ – Crook’s entire police force – seemed to be on call if the alarms were tripped. Other reports made reference to some sort of control room, where guards sit and watch you on CCTV, so we knew some proper stealthy moves were of the essence. After finding a subtle parking spot, right outside the front gate of the building (because it looked like it was about to rain), we hoped no one would notice us and ‘masked up’, preparing our disguises to avoid the hardened security measures that were in place. Just before we hopped the front gate, Box phoned his grandma to arrange bail in the event we got caught. Thankfully, she agreed, and even offered to bring cheese and pickle sandwiches and a flask of tea if we ended up behind bars. Feeling much better that we’d secured our bail, we jumped into the main courtyard and attempted to imitate some classic 90s Power Ranger moves as we ducked and dodged the CCTV cameras. Unfortunately, things didn’t quite work out as well as we would have liked, and very quickly we found ourselves staring directly up at one of the cameras. Knowing that the clock was now ticking, and that we had around ’30 minutes’ left before certain capture, we made a mad dash across the site, frantically searching for a way in. Fortunately, we didn’t have to race around the site aimlessly for too long until we found a suitable way inside. By this point, however, we realised we only had around 20 minutes left before ‘the boys in blue’ turned up. We set about setting our tripods up as quickly as possible, hoping to get a few shots in before they arrived. As the last leg of my tripod clicked into place we could already hear the distant barking of what sounded like dogs – and they sounded pretty fucking big! Inside the central corridor leading to the wards, and, in fact, every other part of the site, security lights suddenly flashed across us, which was very strange considering it was daytime. The three of us quickly ducked and crawled along the old red carpet that’s mostly green these days. It squelched and wheezed, and emitted an incredibly foul-smelling odour, but we didn’t care – the dogs were right outside now, trying to sniff us out. The mossy damp carpet stench would cover our scent perfectly. Loud barks and growls filled the rest of the air around us as we desperately struggled to pull ourselves along the floor without scratching our lenses. At the bottom of the corridor we soon discovered that the PIRs were the least of our worries. It seemed that the previous explorers had failed to notice the ex-Soviet AK48 Russian bear trap that was preventing us from accessing the lowered buildings and, ultimately, our only means of escape. It was only then that we noticed the second ex-Soviet Russian AK48 bear trap to our left. It looked as though it was originally positioned to prevent access to a kitchen area, but another unfortunate urban explorer seemed to have fallen victim to the barbaric mechanism. Held inside the trap firmly at the legs, a fully clothed skeleton was lying on the floor, clutching a dark chocolate KitKat in its left hand. Clearly this explorer had stopped to take a break, and in their excitement to taste the splendid mix of chocolate and wafer had failed to see the deadly trap. It was a tragic sight, and a struggle to fight back the deep sense of sorrow that was welling up inside each of us. However, knowing that we couldn’t hang around long we decided to move on. Fortunately, Mayhem, having absconded from the Soviet Union back in the 80s, had some experience in safely dismantling bear traps, so he set to work disassembling it like a pro. Meanwhile, myself and Box were hungry, so we decided to make use of the leftover KitKat. We shared the last two sticks with one another. There wasn’t enough for Mayhem, and he was busy anyway, so we ate it swiftly before he had time to notice. After that, since Mayhem still hadn’t quite finished with the trap, we had a quick look inside the skeleton’s camera bag. Inside we found a 64gb SD card, which Box wasted no time in swiping, a packet of ginger nuts and a damp wallet. Gripped by a burning sense of curiousity, we opened it and took a peek. Inside there was £4.69 in change, a flavoured condom and some form of ID. A familiar name was displayed prominently on the ID, it read: ACID-REFLUX. The pair of us gasped in shock. Before we could grieve, though, a loud bang erupted from somewhere behind us. ‘The boys in blue’ were there, at least twelve of them too, all dressed in full riot gear. Fortunately, however, and we might add rather conveniently, Mayhem had just managed to diffused the trap, so we all made a run for it. I grabbed the ginger nuts in the brief second before I bolted; there was a chance we might need them for the journey home if we made it back to the car. Not a single one of us dared to look back, we kept running until we reached the car. Box fumbled with the keys for several seconds, but eventually managed to ram the key inside the lock. Everyone jumped inside, and a moment later and the car roared to life. ‘The boys in blue’ were exiting the building now, but Box hit the accelerator and we sped off down the lane. Only a thick cloud of dust appeared in the car mirrors now. Although we regretted leaving ACID’s skeleton behind, cheers and shouts of joy erupted inside the car as we’d managed to evade capture and hadn’t ended up inside a bear trap ourselves. In other words, nothing particularly interesting happened the entire time we were exploring Homelands hospital. Other than finding many toilets and sinks, there’s wasn’t an awful lot else inside any of the buildings. While various parts of the hospital are quite photogenic throughout, it’s probably only worth a visit if you happen to be in Crook or Helmington Row, perhaps visiting relatives? Indeed, we did come across some old CCTV cameras and a few sensors, but, as far as we could tell, none of them appeared to be working. Having said that, we did come across an alarm panel which was still switched on, and the words ‘armed’, or ‘active’ (something along those lines), were contained in the display panel. So who knows, maybe our stealthy skills paid off in the end… Explored with Ford Mayhem and Box. *ACID-REFLUX was not harmed in the making of this report, we did not steal his ginger nuts, and to our knowledge he is still alive and well. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
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