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Found 17 results

  1. Dobroyd mill The history Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use. The explore The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill. The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too. The pics
  2. Kastix Ltd History Built in 1947 as the new drill hall for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion West Riding Regiment. Later used as the offices for Kastix, a textile company producing womenswear and children's clothing, which went in to receivership in 2001 with the loss of more than 50 jobs. Conversion plans There are currently plans to demolish the site to construct an Aldi supermarket. The exterior Bit out of the way... but was in the area so decided to take a look. Its a fair size and considering it's had no owners since 2001 the condition of the place is pretty decent. Stopping at the top of the road and checking for hostiles we decided to take a closer look. Theres lots of works adjacent and we attracted quite a few spectators as we scrambled through the fencing... moving in we could see there were a few CCTV cameras, rusty and outdated these were perhaps part of the security measures when the building was last working. Starting at the front and working our way to the back (drawn quite a crowd at this point) we were intrigued to find an entry point. The exterior is fitting with the period and will be a shame when the building is demolished to make way for the plastic prefabs that are ALDI. Most of the windows and doors are original but it looks like efforts were made to modernise the building at some point. Scaling the roof... checking for open doors windows (bingo).. we were in. The interior Making our way through a small room and then into a much larger hall we were a little taken back by the size of the building... Strewn garments, hangers and palettes of junk made us a little unsettled and it was almost like a worker was about to appear and escort us off the premises (or maybe try sell us some clothing). Making our way past the left overs we headed to the doors littered across the back of the building. slowly working through the rooms we came to the main stairwell... making our way to the upper floors...we made our way through the many offices, empty and miscellaneous rooms ending in an area with some pretty creepy looking changing rooms. Overall theres a few cool bits and in our opinion its worth documenting if not for the very creepy mannequins, the overall condition or the asthetics the sheer amount of stuff left over from previous occupiers. There also an attic area which was a little difficult to reach but it did look like someone had gone to the effort to investigate. That concludes the explore...
  3. The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift. The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread... Exterior Bar Main lobby Stair case shots Corridor shots Bed rooms The caller The ball room and dinning hall The kitchen The roof Other rooms 45 pics later... Hope you enjoyed...
  4. History The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves. Explore We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. Pics Bad video pics The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...
  5. I've had my eye on this for a while, looks like once they got going, they hit it hard cos now, well, its ruined. I'm going to start a campaign, Urbexorzzzz againzzzzt developerzzzzzz! HANDS OF OUR DERPS! A clip from the local news a few years ago gives the info. 'Most of the outpatient services will be moving to nearby Acre Mill along with antenatal services and back room offices. The concern is the hospital will run short of beds as the ageing population rises and hospital bosses say the move would mean they could run a more “efficient and effective� service. The plans were revealed at a Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust board meeting yesterday. The Z block at Acre Mills opposite the hospital will be redesigned to integrate primary and secondary care, community and social care into more of a one-stop service. Director of service development at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust Lesley Hill said: “This plan will require quite a significant re-design but we want patient experience to improve and staff satisfaction to improve. Read more: Examiner http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/local-we ... 2NEyWW8aX' Again, no carpets, but this times we had lights, randomly placed outside lift shafts.... Anyway, visited with drinkinbud andbeardythewierdy, I wouldn't really recommend anyone else bothers LOL. Some bugger around here loves the 2 tone paint job, it's in all the mills! It had a corridor. A room. Some more rooms. One had a wheelbarrow. And a corridor on the way out. First in I think, not bloody worth it. LOL!
  6. It's grim up North! Myself, Drinkinbud and the Beardyemukidwhotagsalong went for a mooch around this mill, we've all passed, either discounted it, it was tight or more recently full of pikeys with diggers?!?!?!!? Comedy of the day involved drinkinbud complaining that he liked southern places better, electricity, carpet, warm........he is now our honorary southern softie LOL! Anyway, here's some stolen history: "The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves." Beardygirlpants doing his thing. Drinkinbud attempting to stare at his strongbow till it magically fills up again.. Graffreflection, just had to. At the top. My big shaft shot. It's full of big rooms. And doors. And lift shafts. HI! Also has an outside. Actually, for somewhere with very little detail, this place was great, well worth a wonder round if you can! Cheers for looking.
  7. Explored with @-Raz- I've been debating whether to post this or not but after a small amount of consideration here it is. Got my first proper DSLR last week after using a Galaxy Smart bridge so if some of my pics are w@nk please leave me some CC. Having said that, I think i've picked it up rather quickly and I'm rather proud of my first set. History; Quoted from various reports The Hospital was founded in 1831 with the carlile wing been opened in 1902. The site incorporates 10 buildings ranging from Grade 2 listed Hospital buildings to modern blocks of classrooms. The former Ramsden Technical College moved on to the New North Road site of the former Huddersfield Royal Infirmary in 1967.The college paid £105,000 for the site. In September 1968 the first students began lectures at New North Road.The first new bulding on the site opened in 1969.The main new block was built in 1971 - the year the college became Huddersfield Technical College By 1978 there were more than 8,000 students studying at the site.In 2008 Huddersfield Technical College merged with Dewsbury College to form Kirklees College The College moved into a new purpose build waterfront development in 2013 which will welcome 20K Students. The old site has been purchased by Oldham based Wiggett Construction Company for an undisclosed sum. Plans for the future of the site are expected to be unveiled early in 2016 but the developers are expected to create a mixed use site featuring residential, retails and leisure uses. The former hospital building has being used for psychological thriller Extremis, starring David O’Hara (Braveheart, The Departed, Luther), Isabelle Allen (Les Miserables), Neil Pearson (Drop the Dead Donkey); and 1980s singer Toyah Wilcox. Black Work, a drama starring acclaimed actress Sheridan Smith, was filmed last Autumn partly in the hospital and in the town and in other parts of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. Also the drama Remember Me staring Michael Palin, Mark Addy and Julia Sawahla was partly filmed here where the building was transformed in to a hospital, care home and a police station as you can see on a few. Explore; Following a relatively unsuccessful morning in Manchester we decided to cut our loses and return to Yorkshire, to a place we've had our eyes on for about a year but never got round to doing. From previous recces we had a general idea where the entry points would be, and after having a quick scout round we promptly found one. Generally the place is pretty knacked, reminding me of Clayton for the most part mixed with a little LGS. The place was generally much wetter than I had first expected, parts resembled more of a river than a college corridor. much to my liking really. And to finish, heres an amusing snap of @-Raz- getting his hair washed dried and perm'd Thanks for looking
  8. Climbed with -Raz- 100% the most exhilarating climb we have ever done, with the cages on the ladders only going half way around the back of you to allow for the holder to rise up and then back down again, it really hit home the importance of keeping a tight hold considering the consequences... Bit of History/Background; Northern Gas Networks own the structure. It is the town’s one remaining gas holder and is maintained to ensure gas supplies never run short. The 127ft giant stores gas and helps meet the enormous peaks in demand that occur in winter. A spokesman said: “In winter there can be as much as five times the amount of gas flowing through the mains than in summer. When everyone wakes up in the morning or gets home from school or work, demand can be so high that we need to have some extra gas stored in case we need it. “That’s where the gas holders are so important. We fill them up overnight, when there’s gas to spare, and they empty during the day when demand is higher.†The holder was originally built in 1916 by W C Holmes and then rebuilt by Clayton & Co in 1968. It is column guided and holds nearly five million cubic feet of gas (or 127,000 cubic metres). There were originally five gas holders at Huddersfield, which have been demolished over the years as more gas becomes stored in underground pipelines. Gas production ceased in the town in the late 1960s. And here is a news report of 3 guys climbing it back in 2013; http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/west-yorkshire-news/huddersfield-gas-climb-stunt-condemned-6152832 The Explore; After a day of fails and alarms we were more determined than ever to get on and do something and having seen this on previous visits to the area we decided to mish over for a look. The surrounding area is pretty much derp city however the Kirklees Council appear to be very handy with that horrible metal sheeting which is nigh on impossible to get around without the help of an angle grinder, or perhaps a teleport. Upon reaching the Gas Holder we quickly established that this giant was not in her prime condition, and as the frame cracked and creaked around us, we began our ascent. What followed was the most terrifying and yet enjoyable climb of my life. The views of Huddersfield in the twilight were pretty cool, not anything spectacular but nice and chiller for a sunday night. Photos; I would like to call this particular image "Oh Fuck This Is High, Why Am I Doing This" Thanks for looking
  9. With this being my first reported post on here as regards a derelict site, I thought it apt that I include one that is literally a cock stride from me. In fact, the rather nice non smoking stack can be seen poking above the roof tops from the bedroom window "GLOBE MILLS". She stands proud and dominates the center of the village. Slaithwaite is the only village in the entire country that has a canal system running straight through it. The mill was founded in 1887, and produced high quality worsted yarns. There's one thing for sure though! The words 'Made In Huddersfield' will always be synonymous with quality cloth. A man was always proud to wear a suit bearing the said same label. The firm was taken over by the Bradford based Amalgamated Textile Company in 1923. In the 1960's they employed 700 people. Many would travel from surrounding areas such as Barnsley in fleets of buses that were especially laid on. Oh happy days eh! By the 1980's the number of employed had dropped to 200, and by 1987 the company was spinning over 10 million miles of yarn a year,producing luxury fibres such as alpaca, mohair, angora and camel-hair. It finally closed It's doors in 2005, and had a massive impact on village life. Not just regarding unemployment, but small retail businesses also suffered because of the closure. ............................... Good things come to those who wait though! http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/local-west-yorkshire-news/2013/05/23/multi-million-pound-plans-to-transform-slaithwaite-mill-submitted-to-kirklees-council-86081-33370830/ ​It seems the sleeping beauty may have a new lease of life after all. Fingers crossed eh ........................................ The Mill is stripped of all It's former humble attire, but she still looks good in my eyes. There were some nice situations in here with great light to play with. A dirty sink and some form of cheese. Very nice. This is the connecting walkway between the Mills. Unfortunately blocked at one end. But this is how it looks from the outside. I simply loved all the colors in here. I then found the steps to heaven via the roof void. And up into the central tower and out to the roof. The Mill in the background is Spa Mill. It's still in operation today. One of the very few left in the Colne Valley that are. It's sister company Sybro Spinning, just up the road, closed not too long ago. It's now trashed beyond belief. The chavs around here certainly know how to conduct the wrecking ball? Back inside then......... Is it pushing the right buttons for you!! It's one of these places you just don't want to leave. This poor buggers here for the duration though. I could have used those maggots for fishing. ....................... Arty shot of the fire escape. And plant life desperately seeking an entry point. Air filters from the air con system. These were massive. Part of the original rope race which powered the looms. Beautiful. Lovely vintage lift. It never came though. Down the stairs and out we go. Visited with fannyadams and judderman 62 on more than one occasion. .............. So It's adios from...... Thanks for looking. ​Pub time. ​
  10. Headed over to Huddersfield for a afternoon in some mills with Fat Panda yesterday, the amount of derelict mills and factories in the area is amazing! Here's a few pics from the first place didn't come out too well but thought I would post em anyway Here's one from another mill close by Cheers for looking
  11. Haven't posted anything in a while guys but hit this place up with Raz just the other day. Really easy access to the rear building and some really cool things to see Unfortunately we could only get into one room of the main building you can see from the road but hey ho. Heres some snaps enjoy...
  12. While in the area me and Raz took a quick look in this small mill that was full of little treats. access was easy although it is on a main road and unfortunately i don't quite recall the name of this one. ill keep it short as usual so here you go... Thanks guys
  13. Driven past so many times and while on a checking huddersfield leads we only managed to get in to here out of around 8 sites on the list.From what I can gather the bottom of this mill was last used around 2008 as a M.O.T centre/garage place.
  14. Hi All. Just to let everyone know that the former Sybro plant has gone up in flames this evening, so if anyone had it on their list! best erase it This was taken from my garden as the whole place is cordoned off. It was due for demo anyway to make way for the Germans ( Aldi )
  15. First set from me from the Englandshire trip, this particular morning we met up with BadBatz and Drinkinbud at particular Hospital but were quickly spotted by secca, and couldn't find a very easy way in, so decided to head of to try somewhere else. Derp Chapel No. 2 was also not an option. Arrived at Derp Mill No.3 of the day and again couldn't seem to find a way in, but also rudely interrupted by a Security guard seeking out details, sadly we all forget them and walked off. Onto Derp No.4 where to our surprise the contractors had moved in, onto site No.5 which actually went smoothly, but this Wool Mill, Derp No.5 of the day was my favourite. Also had it confirmed on good word that this is also BadBatz's favourite explore right after St. Lukes Hospital Quite late in the day and running out of light we dashed around this place getting many long exposures, sadly didn't get to fully explore the offices where all there is lots of bits and bobs left behind! History is very brief but it appears this place was a last home to a Wool Spinning company but has been empty since 2003. On with the pics.. That was it for the day, and big thanks again to BadBatz and Drinkinbud for the laughs during the day, food t night and a place to crash!!
  16. A Roman in a Christian church derelict or not its sacrilege , I just wish people would not smash things up.....hell this would have been 1 very nice find !
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