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Found 7 results

  1. yoyoyo! whats going down kids? feels like its been ages since i fired up a report, feels like ages since id done any exploring until this last weekend to be honest, was buzzing when the fellas invited me along for the ride up north, been a boring few weeks tending to certain needs, didn't take me long long to get bored stupid of staying in doing the whole "netflix and chill" thing the kids are calling it these days. The explore. visited with @The_Raw @Maniac @elliot5200,and was mad little 24 hs of next to no sleep and exploring, you know how it goes the carlton was the second place i tagged along with those filthy southern gents for, literally in elliots case who had had an unfortunate slip in some unfortunate fresh the previous night . We pulled up and it was absolutely pissing down, a quick scout of the access turfed up a decision to pop back after a pint due to some lads unloading a PA system for the phoenix nights-esque club next door. Post pint we headed back up the road and were straight in without a hitch. Its pretty well trashed in there now, which i don't mind sometimes to be honest, can make for some interesting shots-also meant i didn't have any moral objection to booting an old football i found about in there i really like the big buggered window upstairs with all the broken lamp shades hanging about the place, found that quite a photogenic place even with its trashness, if id had more battery i would have gone for a couple more angles, have to say RAWs shot of that window with the fisheye may just have convinced me to buy a fisheye! Yeah the battery situation on my camera was not good, 1/2 a battery and still potentially 3 more locations (including the main reason for the trip) had we popped by sheff on the way home the next day. This is why there is only a few pics and a couple of phone snaps i'm afraid, there's enough pics out there already on the place i'm sure. so yeah all in i enjoyed the carlton, would have liked more battery on my bloody camera but hey ho. Opened on 9th September 1928 with the silent film “Lonesome Ladiesâ€. The Carlton Picture Theatre in Anlaby Road was designed by the firm of Blackmore & Sykes and was built by Messrs. Greenwood and Sons. It was run by Hull Picture Playhouse Ltd. This was a lavish suburban cinema, with an elaborate green and gold sliding dome utilising Venetian glass and housing hundreds of concealled lights. Roman marble mosaics and painted plaster panels on the walls added to the sense of occasion engendered by a trip to the flicks. A Fitton & Haley organ was installed, but this was later removed to the more central Cecil Theatre and was destroyed when that theatre was bombed during WW II. The cinema had two entrances, one in each of the two towers on the front corners of the building. Above the proscenium was the inscription (rather inapt given how soon “talkies†arrived) “A Picture is a poem without wordsâ€. There was a single balcony and, for its date, a surprisingly large car park. It continued unaltered (save for minor war damage) until its closure in April 1967, after which it was simply converted to bingo usage which continued as a Mecca Bingo Club until 2008. phone snaps cam paps sorry its a bit unthorough, really need to keep on top of my batteries a bit better! thanks for looking kids
  2. The Carlton Picture Theatre was designed by the firm of Blackmore & Sykes and was built by Messrs. It was run by Hull Picture Playhouse Ltd and opened on 9th September 1928 with the silent film “Lonesome Ladies”. The cinema had two entrances, one in each of the two towers on the front corners of the building. Above the proscenium was the inscription “A Picture is a poem without words”. This was a lavish suburban cinema, with an elaborate green and gold sliding dome utilising Venetian glass and housing hundreds of concealed lights. The walls were decorated with Roman marble mosaics and painted plaster panels. A Fitton & Haley organ was installed, but this was later removed to the more central Cecil Theatre and was destroyed when that theatre was bombed during WWII. It continued unaltered (save for minor war damage) until its closure in April 1967, after which it was simply converted to bingo usage which continued as a Mecca Bingo Club until 2008. This was a last minute addition to a trip oop north with @Maniac, @Merryprankster and Elliot5200, thanks to @ACID-REFLUX for some helpful info. As we arrived we were put off by lots of activity outside the Phoenix Nights style club next door.... "Shabba".... so we went for a pint down the road to pass some time. We went back One More Time (79) and the coast was clear so we did a quick Duck and Dive (25), made our way inside and it was Time For Fun (41). Despite being a bit trashed the architecture was a Saving Grace (88) and the dome ceiling looked as though it were Made in Heaven (67). Anyway.....onto the pictures and some bingo lingo to go with them, most of which has no connection to the photo whatsoever! 1. Clean The Floor (54) 2. Steps (69) 3. One Score (20) 4. Ask for more (34) 5. Sunset Strip (77) 6. Top of the Shop (90) 7. Dirty Gertie (30) 8. Candy Store (54) 9. Heaven's Gate (78) 10. Straight on Through (82) 11. Nearly There (89) 12. More than Eleven (37) 13. Up to Tricks (46) 14. Down on your Knees (43) 15. Made in heaven (67) 16. Stop and Run (81) Was she worth it? (56) I think so, you've got to love that old architecture. Thanks for looking
  3. Morning all, Explored with Raz So this was a while ago, but as im nearing the end of my back log of reports i thought id post it up for you Bit of background Founded by Joseph Rank in 1875, with the Hull site (Clarence Mill) opening in 1885. It was the first mechanically driven flour mill using steel rollers instead of grinding stones and this produced 6 sacks of flour per hour instead of 1 and a half which was the accepted good rate of production. Such revolutionary technology paved the way for modern flour mills today. During the second world war Hull was prone to heavy bombing runs by the Luftwaffe and the mill was "redesigned" by hitlers flying army and so what you see today (If it is infact still there as the demolition was in full swing last i checked) is a rebuild around the original silos. The factory closed in 2005 and yet still in April this year, 10 years after closure the flour on the floor could give the impression that it was closed only yetserday. The Explore First stop of the day on our trip to Costa Del Hull (T'Yorkshire one, not the one darn sarth) and first of all i was amazed at how easy access was. Raz was telling me about rats the size of dogs and i was bitterly dissapointed i didnt get to see any of these beasts but it was easy to see why, everywhere you looked the floor was covered in bright blue corn... corn isnt normally blue as far as im aware but im northern so what do i know? So i can only assume this was some crazy poison that made even the corpses disolve as we found none. Anyway, good mooch about over some incredibly dodgey floors with some sickening drops below. The roof is a good old place to chill with views out over the city itself and also out over the Humber Estuary and the Deep. Thanks for looking, dont forget to check out my facebook page where i post most my pictures; www.facebook.com/seldomseenworldue
  4. Explored with -Raz- Up untill today i had absolutely no idea what this place was other than an industrial wasteland, and then i stumbled across a report of it on 28DL - Jackpot MADMAX i dont know who you are but you have proved very helpful in helping me find some info, ta! Background; In 1842 Isaac Reckitt, a Quaker, moved from Nottingham to Kingston upon Hull in order to rent a small starch factory in Dansom Lane in the city, and to set up the company known as Reckitt & Sons. Starch was used as a stiffening agent for newly-washed cotton shirts, pillow cases and tablecloths. In its first ten years, therefore, Reckitt & Sons' factory was manufacturing one laundry product. In 1852 it began to produce another one. Fabrics made from natural fibres such as cotton turn unattractively yellow as they get older, probably as the result of oxidation. Reckitt & Sons hit on the idea of adding a very blue colour to the fabric, so that the fibres would reflect both yellow and blue light. When yellow light and blue light are mixed, white light results. The reflected white light makes the fabric appear to be white and the blue colouring matter was therefore acting as a whitening (or brightening) agent for the fibres. Reckitt's product, sold as laundry blue or dolly blue (the washing tub to which the colorant was added, was called a "dolly tub"), consisted of a mixture of synthetic ultramarine and bicarbonate of soda (sodium hydrogencarbonate), packed in a little cotton bag containing a wooden rod to allow it easily to be taken from the hot washing water. Reckitt's Blue soon outsold the original laundry starch and the other products of the Dansom Lane works which included stove blacking, boot polishes and metal polishes such as 'Brasso', and the little cotton bags were on sale for many years until the 1950s when they were replaced by the organic compounds called optical brighteners. The paper industry still uses ultramarine in making good quality white paper. The natural yellow colour of cellulose in the paper is eliminated by the blue pigment in exactly the same way as Reckitt's Blue acted as a cotton whitener. Plant closed in 2007/8 - Cant find an exact date Explore; After a day of mishing around rat infested Rank Hovis, we went for a general drive round to see what we could find. Saw this big old chimney and we really couldnt say no to having a snoop around! the site is currently being used as some kind of waste facility. With huge pipes rinning around the site we were expecting some kind of Pyestock MK 2... however we were sadly dissapointed and looking at MADMAX's report it appears we came far too late and most of what he saw was gone, including the steps up the chimney Still a fun climb around and i got some decent shots Photos; If you got this far, thanks for looking
  5. Headed over to Hull for a solo visit when I got wind of an 'abandoned prison'. I didn't expect too much and the place isn't anything special but has a few ok bits. Brief History Sutton Place was a reformatory prison for young offenders in the criminal justice system deemed to be dangerous to themselves or others. The facility was opened in 1992 and achieved "Outstanding" status by government inspectors. The secure unit had 10 beds and provided services for boys and girls up to 17 years old. The facility closed in 2009 after the Youth Justice Board decided not to renew the units £1.8million contract. 1. External in the courtyard 2. Ball in courtyard 3. External 4. Boy's wing 5. Cell corridor 6. Inside a cell 7. Inside a cell 8. Communal area 9. Communal area 10. Sports hall 11. Famous people on sports hall wall 12. External
  6. Explored with Raz Now we've all seen this from time to time on old reports but nothing has really been documented for quite some time, and the reason for this is the building is well, fucked. However, dont judge a derp by its exterior, venture inside and see what we found!! Short History; Built in 1948 & officially opened in 1949, Lord Line served the trawling industry until 1975 when the dock closed. Many attempts were made to restore and give this building a new life but all failed. Now day by day this handsome building is losing its grandeur. Left to decay, rot and fall into pieces, it seems unlikely the building will survive. The Explore; One sunny day April myself and Raz decided to break my new car in with a tour of the best derps Humberside had to offer, and derps they were!! After a stop at the most disgusting place i've ever been, namely Rank Hovis, called Rank because it was RANK. We headed to an industrial platground with a huge tower and had some fun climbing about and laughing (tastelessly) at a nearby mill called ISIS Mill. On our way back we stopped off for the ritual McDonalds and saw this old wreck in the distance. With a few hours of day light to kill we headed on over and met a group of 3 12(ish) year olds who were running around the incredibly dangerous site. Anyway in we went and found that instead of the boring square room shithole we were expecting, we found that every room was a different shape and the staircase, knackered as it was, was still really pleasing to look at Not a spectacular location but well worth a mooch if your nearby If you got this far, thanks for looking
  7. Carlton Cinema Hull

    Hi Guy, was just wondering if anybody has been to the cinema lately and if you would be able to get me a little help with access please or any information that would be helpfull. Thank you!
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