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Found 7 results

  1. Our original plan was to spend Christmas here but weather forecasts were dire and we didn't want to die a watery death so we binned the idea off and went to Wales instead! Planning our summer road trip and this place cropped up again and it was game on! We'd do the island before heading off to foreign lands for a couple of weeks. After spending the previous night watching an awesome lightning storm we were hoping for good weather! Waking up a few hours later in the back of the limo to see rain I snuggled back into my sleeping bag and went back to sleep. When I next awoke the sky was grey and it was drizzly, and with an uncertain forecast we decided to check out a few alternative locations instead. A few fails and some epic jungleering through the undergrowth later, the sun decided to come out and we bit the bullet and decided Operation Island Infiltration was back on! A few hours later and we were busy unloading gear (lots and lots and lots of gear) by the sea and Riddlers was busy blowing up his dingy ready to take us out! There appeared to be quite a bit of interest in our little escapade but throwing caution to the wind the first three intrepid explorers set sail and it wasn't long before all 7 of us were safely on dry land. We set up camp and then went for a bit of an explore, its a lovely little place with lots to see and I proper enjoyed just mooching about whilst the boys played with the cannons and drank beer. We had fire and food before heading to bed for an early night, the Merry Prankster set up his projector and fell asleep to South Park, The Riddlers got shouted at for playing shit music and keeping people awake and me and Jobs had a hammock fail and ended up on the floor! In the morning we were getting ready to leave but when we looked out across the water it was bedlam, the police boat, RNLI and Lifeguards were out in force, initially thinking we had been spotted we awaited their arrival, but much to our bemusement they appeared to be clearing the harbour!! A quick google later and we discovered there was an airshow just about to start and for safety reasons they were clearing the public from underneath the display area. Well almost all the people, we had the choice seats directly underneath as bi-planes looped and dipped across the skies, dropping low enough for them to see us and give us a friendly wave as they passed by! After enjoying the show we got ready to leave, with The Riddlers at the helm, Bigjobs and Motionless Escape were the first to go. We watched them bobbing across the waves until we saw them land but an age passed and there was no sign of them returning. One phone call later and we discovered a pin had broken on the boat and they were frantically trying to fix it. So with visions of having to be rescued by the Lifeguards we waited and waited and waited, then boom across the harbour we spotted him! THey'd fixed the boat and The Riddlers was making his way back Not long after we were back on dry land chattering like excitable children on a school trip planning our next stop! History Located in the heart of the harbour lies Drake Island. The island was originally called St Nicholas' Island and later St Michael's Island before it was renamed and dedicated to Sir Francis Drake in the late Tudor period. Originally is accommodated an artillery battery, this was followed by a larger garrison and during the Civil War, the Island played a key role in the defence of Plymouth against Royalist Attack. In the mid-sixteenth century, the first fortification was commissioned as a result of the war with France. A stone and turf wall built and a garrison was installed in 1551. In 1580 a disagreement between the people of Plymouth and the Government over who had responsibility for paying for the defence it was taken into state ownership. By 1590s a garrison of 100 men and 40-50 guns were installed, increasing further as the war with Spain continued. After the restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War, the island was used as a prison for notable Parliamentary prisoners. Major General John Lambert, the successor to Oliver Cromwell, was held here from 1670-84. Also incarcerated here was Colonel Robert Lilburn, one of the regicides. The defences visible today mainly date from the mid-nineteenth century when the large casemates were constructed complete with supporting magazines and accommodation. Finally, the Island was garrisoned by just under 500 soldiers for much of WWII supporting coastal defence and anti-air operations. In 1963 Plymouth Council obtained a lease from the Crown and a youth centre was opened in 1964, coming under the custody of the Mayflower Trust until they surrendered the lease in 1989. The Island was bought by Dan McCauley in 1995 with a view to building a hotel and helipad. Initial plans were rejected due to the nesting egrets on the Island but as of April 2017 a further plan has been submitted with protection plans in place and work is expected to start in the not too distant future. Hope you enjoyed looking
  2. The Visit An impromtu Sunday evening explore took us to Wallerscote as its quite close by and wanted to see it for a while, access was quite good fun with a nice bit of barbed wire climbing. Inside the place is huge but now only used by lots of pigeons it seems.. We missed an encounter with secca by mere minutes as well The History Founded by a couple of chaps named John Brunner and Ludwig Mond in 1973 they began producing soda ash about a year later. They used brine solution, ammonia and limestone to produce sodium carbonate in pure form. I understand that at its peak the factory produced 200,000 tons of soda ash a year meaning that the Brunner Mond company became the largest producer of the product in the country and the worlds largest alkali exporter. Wallerscote island Works was completed in 1926. the construction consists of silos and huge metal sheds although all were integral parts of the original structure. The company later became part of ICI which is now owned by Tata. Sodium Carbonate is a widely used in industry for casting and glassmaking. It is commonly used in chemistry as a base and an electrolyte. It is also used domestically in detergents, dyes and toothpaste as well as tasty sherbet sweets!
  3. Abandoned since 1986 this derelict prison camp located in a remote area of the North Island in New Zealand barely resembles a prison. The prison is heavily decayed with surprisingly little vandalism, the prisons strange colour schemes were meant to help calm prisoners. Our road trip taking us to this prison began with a sunny 18 degrees, five hours later we were in snow, this place had a very somber feeling to it. Cheers for looking at our explores in New Zealand, sorry if it was a little picture heavy! More here: http://urbexcentral.com/2014/05/20/waikune/
  4. Explored with therealindianajones and one non member, Well this one was fun, Access was a bit hmmmm I’ll say adventurous and resulted in me getting stabbed in the head with a 2inch thorn OUCH while shimmying across a very narrow muddy bank on the sides on a canal Secca was on the ball and there was many times we tried our best to blend in with the foliage to remain undetected All in all it was a good day
  5. It was my Father's birthday... so i took him down to Plymouth and over to Drake Island as a present... in an 8ft dinghy! It's a fantastic place, steeped in history from way back in 1135 and this is worth a read - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake%27s_Island. Sorry the pictures lack quality, the majority were taken with a camera phone but that's another story, alas, here are a few... The target. The approach. Barracks. Seagull spotter. Cartridge Lift. My shorts were on and the chicken legs on show. Old meets new... Napoleonic fortification with WWII addition. Waves crashing against the island, over and over with spray coating the pillbox, day in and day out. Up top on the centre battery, looking back towards the barracks with Plymouth in the distance. Where things went... boom! ... and last but by no means least, more guns!
  6. UK Kelham Island Museum, Sheffield, may 2011

    Boy do i pick em !, there is that much to see and write about I can not fit it on this site so this is a snippet and the end link is to my blog where i'm about 3/4 way through what I want out of this place. On my blog is a nice video which i took of the main engine from full speed to reverse in just 2 seconds. What a cracking day out this was for both me and Jo a reet nice trip round the Museum, only down side was when I asked to obtain a few shots from the gantry around there steam engine the answer was NO......... sad really I will have to contact the Manager of the museum and see if we can work some thing out !..... A Bessemer converters inside the Museum grounds, this item is big.....real BIG !. Built in 1905 by Davy Brothers of Sheffield, this powerful 12,000 horse power engine worked for 73 years in the city, initially powering a rolling mill at Charles Cammell's Grimesthorpe Works. The rolling mill made armour plate for the first Dreadnought battleships in the mid 1910s, and during World War II it rolled plate for the King George V battleships. In the 1950s the engine was transferred to British Steel Corporation's River Don Works where it powered the rolling mill for producing heavy plate to be used on oil rigs and as reactor shields. The engine was moved to Kelham Island Museum in the late 1970s, and is now in working condition and steamed for museum visitors. It represents the power and volume of Sheffield manufacturing industries during the 1900s. This engine is on 4 floors..... 3 you can see and 1 below to access the crank shaft etc. Looking into the stores. Mock set-up of Sheffield from days gone-by. A reet nice gas lamp. hope you liked this report the best is in the below link..... http://nick-myurbex.blogspot.com/2011/05/kelham-island-museum.html
  7. This is one part you never see from here. Not open to the public. Some Info - Originally called Little Oyster Island, Ellis Island acquired its name from Samuel Ellis, a colonial New Yorker. The federal immigration station opened on January 1, 1892 and was closed on November 12, 1954, but not before 12 million immigrants were inspected there by the US Bureau of Immigration (Immigration and Naturalization Service). There are unsubstantiated estimates for immigrants processed there as high as 20 million. In the 35 years before Ellis Island opened, over 8 million immigrants had been processed locally by New York State officials at Castle Garden Immigration Depot in Manhattan. Those with visible health problems or diseases were sent home or held in the island's hospital facilities for long periods of time. Then they were asked 29 questions including name, occupation, and the amount of money they carried with them. Generally those immigrants who were approved spent from three to five hours at Ellis Island. However more than 3 thousand would-be immigrants died on Ellis Island while being held in the hospital facilities. Some unskilled workers and immigrants were rejected outright because they were considered "likely to become a public charge." About 2 percent were denied admission to the U.S. and sent back to their countries of origin for reasons such as chronic contagious disease, criminal background, or insanity. Medical inspections The symbols below were chalked on the clothing of potentially sick immigrants following the six-second medical examination. The doctors would look at them as they climbed the stairs from the baggage area up to the Great Hall. Immigrants' behaviour would be studied for difficulties in getting up the staircase in any way. Some only entered the country by surreptitiously wiping the chalk marks off or by turning their clothes inside out. 1 B - Back 2 C - Conjunctivitis 3 CT - Trachoma 4 E - Eyes 5 F - Face 6 FT - Feet 7 G - Goiter 8 H - Heart 9 K - Hernia 10 L - Lameness 11 N - Neck 12 P - Physical and Lungs 13 PG - Pregnancy 14 S - Senility 15 SC - Scalp (Favus) 16 SI - Special Inquiry 17 X - Suspected Mental Defect 18 X (circled) - Definite signs of Mental Defect Writer Louis Adamic came to America from Slovenia in southeastern Europe in 1913. Adamic described the night he spent on Ellis Island. He and many other immigrants slept on bunk beds in a huge hall. Lacking a warm blanket, the young man "shivered, sleepless, all night, listening to snores" and dreams "in perhaps a dozen different languages". As with all historic areas administered by the National Park Service, Ellis Island, along with Statue of Liberty, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. Today Ellis Island houses a museum reachable by ferry from Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey and from the southern tip of Manhattan in New York City. The Statue of Liberty, sometimes thought to be on Ellis Island because of its symbolism as a welcome to immigrants, is actually on nearby Liberty Island, which is about 1/2 mile to the south. Ellis island was also known as "The Island of Tears" or "Heartbreak Island"because of the 2% who were not admitted after the long transatlantic voyage. The entire South Side of Ellis Island (know as island 2 & 3) is of course not accessible to the general public. Ellis from ferry. Hospital Bldg. Asylum Cotagious ward hall View from the contagious ward window. Staff house Staff house fireplace Whats left of the kitchen Leftover stuff Hall to the morgue(I did not get into the morgue :amgry:) On the ferry leaving ellis Back to liberty state park.
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