Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'january'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings,Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 14 results

  1. This was not only a house but also a atelier carpets and antiques. It is a villa very strange... a part old-style and a part, perhaps renovated, very modern. Welcome to Villa K.
  2. Finally got to visit the place that sparked my addiction to these places and it was worth the wait! after unintentionally using some other lads we bumped into as bait for the secca we made our way round the endless corridors like headless chickens trying to decide which way to go and after just short of 2 hours we walked straight into security! probably the most friendly I've bumped into yet and nicely pointed out the best bits on our long walk out, all of which we missed ! Apologies if the fish-eye is too much pics shot from my gopro! The History Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex, UK was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 and opened in May 1913. The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on a plan whereby wards, offices and services were within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between in the years after its opening. Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy.. A change in management during the 1960s (and likely a change in social acceptances) saw reforms introduced including the creation of art and music therapy programs and the widespread use of drugs and medication. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospita Thanks for looking
  3. SEVERALLS HOSPITAL - DECEMBER 2014 Severalls Hospital history The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990's following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, as a temporary building for the nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the central boiler house in 2007. In 2008 the sale of the hospital site, including its extensive grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the building industry. Planning permission was however granted in 2011 to redevelop the site. Today Building work is now up to the perimeter of the main site on the eastern side. This includes the construction of a new road that will link the A12 with the junction of the Northern Approach Road and Mill Road which covers land where several villa's once stood along with part of the former cricket pitch. As a consequence the dog walker's path is closed whilst the new road(s) intersect it. In my theory the new road will provide a good way to carry poor old Severalls away once demolition starts, as it avoids the majority of residential areas with a useful direct link to the A12. The new road is now nearing completion and a spur from the new link road leads ominously up to the main perimeter fence. This year, could be her last... The explore Spending all night in an asylum has been on my mooching bucket list for sometime. I wanted to experience Severalls at night (and no - it has nothing to do with ghost c**ting), but all to do with atmosphere and the gradual change from night to day and taking away (hopefully) a few half decent snaps. Explored in the always excellent company of Hamtagger and Matt Inked. It is surreal to be on a Friday late night train from Liverpool Street, stuffed full of very loud pissed up city types heading home to middle England and ponder that in just over an hours time they will all be left behind and home for the next ten and a half hours will be exclusively peaceful... 1. Full moon - it was not to be sadly. 2. Day room.. at night. 3. 4. Ok, i can hear: "what the hell is that?". I liked this effect, night sky on glazed tiles in the smaller kitchen. 5. Cold kitchen. Yes, it really was cold - middle of winter is always the best time to do an all nighter . 6. On to the next day and ablutions time. 7. I think we were feeling 'vacant' after ten plus hours... 8. Far Male Wards. These were at least 20 degrees warmer than the female side for anyone thinking of repeating this exercise. 9. 10. 11. 12. Severalls one and only chair. With the bed gone, this is the only comfort around . 13. 14. Path to paradise. Thanks for looking folks!!
  4. UK Epiphany Church, January 2014

    The building, which was completed in 1846, was designed by J B Cantrill and is Early English style with a gothic tower. It cost £3,700. In 1997, soon after the 150th Anniversary, it was found that the ceiling and roof were unsafe. The church closed quickly for repairs and the congregation met, temporarily, in the nearby Mechanics Institute. The repairs needed were found to be extensive and with great reluctance, the building and part of the churchyard were put up for sale. A final Open Air Service of Farewell was held in the new graveyard on Sunday 5th September 1999. Whatever your view of on religion, I still felt a kind of melancholy thinking of the deep affection many over the years would have felt for this place and that chances of a change of fortune for it are remote.
  5. Founded in 1897, this company manufactured Wood working machinery until it's liquidation in 2010. I believe the company name still exists in some sort of servicing capacity. A pretty cool place, although the factory floor is empty there is still a few bit's & pieces dotted about. A quick solo visit which made a good to start the 2014 season with a trouble free explore.
  6. Very "thrilly" there - seems to be inhabitated by someone (an running mp3 player, hidden in a room - attached to the linejack to somewhere... weee...), but i loved the thrill this place gave me. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  7. DAS-Theater01 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater02 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater03 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater04 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater05 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater06 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater07 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater08 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater09 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater10 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater11 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater12 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr
  8. Babies Castle, Hawkhurst, We decided to get out n about on a bit of a mini road trip, Chose this as the destination, took a while to get there and wanted to visit another well known site within the area for those of you that probably know it but unfortunately Its since been sold and the builders were in, This is the only fruit of our day !, So on with a bit of history Construction began on a new two-storey red brick building in the spring of 1886, and on 9th August it was formerly opened by Her Royal Highness, The Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, accompanied by her daughter princess Victoria who was later to become Queen Mary, the wife of King George V. In May 1959 a local Townswomen's Guild expressed 'considerable surprise' at the large number of 'coloured infants' at the Babies Castle. They warned that unless they could be assured that no white child was being refused admission as a consequence their support of Dr. Barnardo's would cease but they were reassured and the matter blew over. Clearly they had never bothered to read Thomas Barnardo's aims, known as "The Nine Nos"... 1. No destitute child refused 2. No Race Barrier 3. No Creed Clause 4. No Physical Disability 5. No Age Limit 6. No Money Promise 7. No Voting 8. No Waiting 9. No Red Tape (A lot of this Bullshit in modern day UK) Will in the famous kitchen And some of the Sumptuous Rooms, The Height of luxury in their day ! Quick, Our Way Out ! If you love Pealing Paint & Natural Decay, Then this is definitely the place for you ! All in all a fun day out with truly great company ! Thanks for viewing my Pics
  9. Thamesteel Visited with Chaos and non member Markymark History Thamesteel, in Sheerness Kent was a steel foundry until January 2012. The owners of the plant went into administration and workers came to work to be told that they no longer had a job. Nothing has happened since that day, everything lays exactly as it was, just with a layer of dust covering every last bit of history which was left behind. Another victim of Britain's lack of support for industry. Former owners the Al-Tuwairqi Group (ATG) took it back over in June, but since then there has been no news on what will happen to it except that it could cost up to £30million to decontaminate the land. Members of Community Union, which represents the workers, even wrote an open letter to ATG chairman Dr Hilal Al-Tuwairqi asking what his intentions are for the site, but he failed to respond. Rumours about other takeovers have been quashed and numerous meetings at various government departments have taken place, but still no one knows what is happening. A legal dispute about ownership of the assets is ongoing between Peel Land and Property, which owns the site, and ATG - but it is unclear when this will be resolved. There are still around 250 outstanding unfair dismissal claims filed by Community on behalf of the staff who lost their jobs. The explore Back in January when we decided to crack this it was cold....bitterly cold, we all had snotty noses and weren't really up for it. A disgustingly early 2am start was in order so that we used the cover of darkness to our advantage to gain access. We'd had a decent heads up from an outside source and after a miserable 3hr drive and disappointing McDonalds breakfast we did a quick driving recce of the fence. We decided to park up out of sight and geared up, we took a walk along the fence line and eventually found a way in, the secca hut was close by so we observed the hut and saw a high vis exit then moments later walk back in, it was now or never so we scrambled across a bit of open ground and made our way over to the mammoth site. Once in we headed at speed for the main buildings to get out of the ice cold wind, with it still being dark we cautiously made are way around and eventually managed to navigate ourselves to small office/workshop where we lay low until the sun came up, It was black as a witches tit in there. The sun slowly made appearance piercing through holes and windows in the roof slowly warming our chilled bones, the morning sun illuminating the epic size of the explore we had came for. 1. 2. Due to the nature of the closure it seemd it was simple case of 'down tools' 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Little bit of engine porn to finish off Thanks for looking
  10. I've been meaning to get over here for ages and this weekend I finally made it over to see this old hospital. A huge place, heavily trashed in places but plenty of stuff left to see. We spent about 4 hours inside with no issues and in no way did we see it all. I believe it shut in stages from 2009 with the last bit to close some time last year. Here are some pictures
  11. We stopped off here on the way back from the DRI. I have seen them many times from a distance but this was he first time I had seen them close up. They were a lot bigger than I thought. There are five towers in total and they are all that remains from both Willington A & Willington B Power stations which closed in 1995 & 1999 respectively. Only a few pics from here as we didn't stay too long.
  12. After a few failed attempts over the past year. I saw online that it was becoming popular again, so I thought I would give it a try again. This time with no problems. Spent 7 hours inside here. Didn't see anyone else. We saw fresh footprints on the floor that didn't match any of our footwear, then noticed a few doors being sealed up that weren't the first time around? strange! Any way, here are my pictures. Nothing new, just the same stuff! A couple are a slight HDR but nothing eye burning! Hope you like. Founded in the reign of King George I, the Royal Hospital Haslar in Gosport, Hampshire, was one of several hospitals serving the Portsmouth Urban Area, but had previously been the country's foremost – and ultimately last – military hospital. Its military status was withdrawn in 2007, and those military personnel remaining joined the Ministry of Defence Hospital Unit (MDHU Portsmouth) at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham, Portsmouth. In the summer of 2009, all remaining (civilian) medical services at Haslar were relocated to the Queen Alexandra Hospital, and the site was subsequently sold. The Royal Military Hospital Haslar had a number of notable specialist medical facilities, including a decompression chamber and a zymotic isolation ward. History[edit] The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746–61. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients. Haslar was the biggest hospital – and the largest brick building – in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716–1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785–1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh Phrenological Society. In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar). In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War. In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services – the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar. In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar. In 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy. The hospital formally closed in 2009 and the site has since started to be redeveloped. PLEASE LOOK UP AND SEE THE TRAM LINES:^ The Haslar Tramway was constructed in 1877 as a single line running from the Haslar Jetty into the Main Arcade of the hospital. At the jetty there was an ambulance shed with a junction for the storage of the ambulance tram and a similar junction at the Arcade. The two trams were built by the London and Midland Railway. Hospital boats or cutters collected the sick, wounded or dead from the anchoring fleet at Spithead and the dockyard and ferried them to the Haslar Jetty. On arrival at the jetty the patients were landed and transferred to the ambulance. Sick Berth staff then pushed the ambulance to the Main Arcade. On arrival at the Arcade the patients were then carried to the hospital receiving room for admission. Thank You!
  13. Took me three attempts to get in here, with a few injuries along the way and with the police hot on my tail for the first time. Finally got in when it opened up again, on a snowy freezing cold day. So happy! Loved it, quite an opulent place. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  14. Visited with Webbley and Chrisr86. In Dec 2012 Maternity Bit and January 2013 for the Video! The Cambridge Military Hospital, built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot, was located at Stanhope Lines. It was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and opened on 18 July 1879. In the First World War, the Cambridge Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front. The Cambridge Hospital was also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. Captain Gillies (later Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. Morestin was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. Gillies fell in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 was sent back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the Cambridge Hospital. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties. The hospital also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. http://youtu.be/Umam2fBzZy4 Thanks!

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!
×