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Found 13 results

  1. Ok time to get some stuff up outta my large back log lol. History seems a little weak on this but im sure you know it by now. Explore : Ok took 2 atempts due to gardeners round back being nosey lol. And also the original planned way was sealed. Overall was a decent mooch @stranton joined me on this adventure lol. And moaned all the way. To be honest the classrooms where best bit ohhhhh and strantons now famous train lol. Anyway thanks to @Vulex for first heads up on this. Sorry i aint been posting much i deffo been getting lazy :-(.. Not sue exact date it was in 2015. Anyways on with pics. Found this heartwarming a single drawing left behind.. I tried to catch the sunset has i did the street lamps came on. It created this lol Has always thanks to everyone for looking its very apreciated .. See you soon all.
  2. After memories of passing this place and being dropped off in the carpark back in the college days, seeing the pub boarded up meant it’s been on the list to explore for quite some time. At the first opportunity, teaming up with Tiny Urban Exploration, we were there! The pub is now unfortunately stripped of most interesting features and nearly everything you can imagine smashed to pieces by the local youths. Kindly resulting in another injury for UrbexDevil for the second time in a row… cheers kids! Make shift wrapping up the cut to stop blood dripping everywhere we pressed on. Rather amusingly as we exited the building and proceeded to take external photos, the local police spotted us. After a rather amusing conversation on how they thought they were going mad seeing flashes and a long minor issue of a stop and search, we were told that kids were arrested only a few hours before us for smashing the place to pieces. Onto the history side now! The John Gilpin pub has been trading since 1878, owned by McMullens closed in 2014 after more than 125 years of trading. Despite a large investment years before, the land has been sold to developers and its demolition is imminent. The pub was named after a poem made famous by William Cowper in 1782.
  3. Hi all a nice new report from me on a recent explore. This is a cracking little church with some awesome stuff still left and very photographic. And seeing has its close to christmas this seems like a good time to do it and post it. Some awesome stuff here like the tower and the bell. In what i coulden't resist to ring hell ive always wantd to have a go. But bloody hell its a lot louder than ya think lol. And that was via a little tap. Anyways met a few people here not to many just 4. So all in all was not to bad was expecting a coach to be here to be honest lol. So went with the missus and she loved every bit of it. It was a great place indeed not sure how much longer she got has wont be long before kids etc start to fook her up but for now shes a stunner. I'm sure you all going to like this one. Picked a cracking day for this has it was the village christmas party. So everone was busy. Can see why its stood the test of youth etc has its in an incredibly viewable place where loads of people can see what ya up to. And homes built right next to it practicaly on the ground lol. Anyways armed with a new camera thx to @ACID-REFLUX off we went. I would also like to add that the climb up the tower is a bitch and bloody narrow. The only shot i seem to have missed is that of the organ. Not to bad a loss has its in semi decent condition not sure how i forgot. Also there is a basement but a fat ass like me cant fit lol. And there is electric and water still on in this place. And has a word of caution in the tower the floors are in an extremely bad way. Major butt tightning. History : St John's was built between 1890 and 1892 to a design by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley. The estimated cost of the church was �6,800 but, because of problems with the foundations, its final cost, including the fittings, was nearer to �12,000 (�1,170,000 in 2015). It provided seating for 616 people.Financial donations towards the site and structure of the church were made by Thomas Brooks, 1st Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw Hall. Because of diminishing numbers attending the church, and because of thefts of lead from the roof of the church, the congregation has decided to opt for the church to be declared redundant. The church was declared redundant on 20 February 2012. The church is constructed in sandstone with Yorkshire stone dressings and is roofed in green Cumberland slate. Its architectural style is Perpendicular.[2] The plan consists of a nave and chancel in one range, north and south aisles, a south transept, and a north transept above which rises a tower. A clerestory rises above the aisles along the length of the nave, to the south of the chancel is a chapel, and to its north is a vestry. There is a porch in the westernmost bay of the south aisle, and another porch in the angle of the south transept.[2][6] On each side of the clerestory are ten square-headed two-light windows. The west window has five lights and contains intersecting tracery. Along the aisles are buttresses and two-light windows. The south transept also has buttresses, and a large five-light window containing Perpendicular and curvilinear tracery. The chancel has a large east window with six lights containing Perpendicular tracery. The tower has diagonal corner buttresses that rise to octagonal turrets surmounted by crocketed pinnacles. The summit of the tower has an embattled parapet.[2] Interior The interior of the church is lined with red Rainhill sandstone.[6] The five-bay arcades are carried alternately on round and octagonal columns. The chancel arch is high, and has two orders of moulding. There are carved wooden screens between the nave and the chancel, and between the chancel and the north transept. Some of the choir stalls have elaborately carved crocketed canopies containing statues.[2] The reredos dates from the 20th century, and contains statues of the Four Evangelists. The font is hexagonal. In the church are memorials to members of the Brooks family.[6] Inside the tower, and near to the tower, are carved texts from Psalm 148.[5] The Church of England Commissioners had agreed the sale of the church to a small non trading renewable energy company in 2013. However a planning application was rejected in January 2015, as the plans involved the removal of 80% of the tree's on the site, most of which have Tree Preservation Orders on them. The siting of one 40ft and two 20ft used shipping containers in place of the tree's was also cited by planners the reason for rejecting the scheme.[9][10] As the site has been removed from the Church's list of buildings for sale, its current status is unknown. PICS: Christmas shots lol The bell .. It goes DONG loudly lol Really pissed at this shot has i really really wanted it. But was major dark and fooking floor moves and shit the shit being bomb diving bloody pidgeons sure these fookers take after an old japanese custom lol. Sorry for blur but give ya idea of it. Atleast the inside bell shot came out ok. The tower stairs Sorry for pic heavy just so much to shoot. Anways these last 2 are my faves so will say thanks for looking and have a good christmas all. Merry christmas have a great time and thanks for looking at the stunning church.
  4. We came across this looking for some underground stuff and was a nice little find. Since we went I have seen in the news that parts of it have been set on fire and unsafe. History.. In 1819, Rylands & Sons were established with their seat of operations being in Wigan. John, the youngest partner, occupied himself with travelling over several counties for orders until 1823, when he opened a warehouse for the firm in Manchester. Business increased rapidly, and in the course of a few years extensive properties at Wigan, along with dye works and bleach works, were purchased. Valuable seams of coal were afterwards discovered under these properties, and proved a great source of wealth to the purchasers. From 1847, John Rylands became sole proprietor of the company owing to the death of his father and retirement of his brothers around 1839. Designed by George Woodhouse in 1866, Rylands Mill was built and had served the local population for work until the overall demise of the textile industry had taken it's toll across the country. In 1985 it became an annexe to Wigan Technical College and became better known as the Pagefield Building until closure in 2007. The facade along the front was repointed and boasts some wonderful brick pattern work, this mill being the most expensive around at the time it was built. Owners Tower Gate recieved planning consent from the Planning committee for residential and office use but have yet to start any work onsite. There is a three year expiry date in which works must start or another plannning application must be lodged.
  5. Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum Yeah I know she's been covered a multitude of times, but to me, It will always remain one of my top visits. How can you not love St John's! St John’s hospital in Bracebridge heath has a long and interesting history. The Asylum was built in 1852 and enlarged on several subsequent occasions. It was originally established jointly by Lindsey, Kesteven, Holland, Lincoln, Grimsby and Stamford, and managed by a Board of Visitors appointed by the contributing authorities. Kesteven and Grantham withdrew from the arrangement when the contract of Union expired in 1893 (eventually establishing the Kesteven County Asylum at South Rauceby, 1897). The hospital was set in grounds of 120 acres which included gardens, farmland and a burial ground. In 1940 female patients were transferred to other hospitals, mainly Storthes Hall near Huddersfield, to make space for an Emergency Hospital, and many did not return until well after the end of the War. Administration of the hospital passed to the National Health Service in 1948. By the early 1960s it was known by its final name of St John's Hospital. Patients were admitted from Harmston Hall Hospital when that hospital closed. St John's Hospital itself was closed in December 1989 with the remaining patients transferred to other establishments. The site was sold for housing and most of the buildings apart from the central block were demolished. Italian style elegance. The hospital had male, female and children’s wings and used some of the traditional medical techniques in that day to cure insanity, including electric shock treatment. Conditions such as depression and post natal depression were classed as a mental illness and treated the same as someone with schizophrenia. Brain surgery was believed to cure mental illness and was commonly used in asylums such as this. If a patient was deemed unfit to decide what treatment they wanted, the doctors would decide for them. The famous cat in the children's ward The following names, among others, were used for the Institution, sometimes interchangeably: 1852-1893 Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum or Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum 1894-1915 Lincolnshire Lunatic Asylum 1897-1898 Lindsey, Holland, Lincoln and Grimsby District Pauper Lunatic Asylum 1903-1920 Lincolnshire Asylum 1898-1902 Bracebridge Pauper Lunatic Asylum 1902-1919 Bracebridge District Lunatic Asylum 1919-1948 Bracebridge Mental Hospital 1930-1938 Lincolnshire Mental Hospital 1939-1960 Bracebridge Heath Hospital 1961-1989 St John's Hospital, Bracebridge Heath The hospital was also used as a wartime Emergency Hospital in the period 1940-1943, and a few records of this function survive with the asylum records. The corridor of cells I couldn't imagine being thrown into a salmon pink cell! Or even a sickly green one either The corridor of crosses. The Lincoln Crest. That wonderful staircase. She just oozes atmosphere throughout. Deep in the cellars. The honeycombed ceiling even continues down here. The safe door in the admin block. Solid metal and bloody heavy. Close up of the lock. And the beautifully crafted key that fit it. Here's some men at work. And a fungi. Head towards the door, and shit....... No floor. Some nice peeling paint. Vintage wallpaper. A couple of door shots. I like doors. Room with a view. And to finish with.... A couple of items I managed to win on that well known auction site. Postcard dated 1899. Other side of the postcard regarding the minutes book, and the fantastic Asylum truck. Ta for looking
  6. I've been to this place 3 times now, so these are a mixture from those visits. Parts I only discovered on my most recent visit and I had a new lens to play with, plus showing some UrbExing friends around who hadn't been here before (one of whom hadn't done an asylum) gave me the perfect excuse to go back. Anyways, enough with that chat...history's been covered a number of times, so I'll just get on with the photos! Visited with a few non-forumers. The rest of the photos can be found here - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jesstified/sets/72157631983681559/. Thank you for looking
  7. John Summers & Sons Ltd was a major United Kingdom iron and steel producer, latterly based at Shotton, Flintshire. The company was absorbed into British Steel in 1967; British Steel became Corus in 1999 and this company was taken over by Tata Steel in 2007. The founder, John Summers, was born in Bolton, Lancashire in 1822. While working as a clogger, he visited the Great Exhibition in 1851, where he bought a nail making machine, and commenced making nails with which to fasten the iron strips on to the soles of clogs. In 1852, Summers moved into Sandy Bank Iron Forge at Stalybridge, where he successfully concentrated on the production of clog irons and nails. He then purchased land near the forge, and built a new ironworks, known as the Globe Works. John Summers died on 10 April 1876, at the age of 54. Three of his sons, James, John and Alfred, carried on the business, and they were joined by another brother, Henry Hall Summers in 1869. Space for expansion at the Globe Works having been exhausted, the firm opened the Hawarden Bridge Steelworks at Shotton in 1896. In 1898 the firm became a Private Limited Company and in 1908, on completion of new offices, the headquarters were transferred to Shotton. By 1909 the company was the largest manufacturer of galvanized steel in the country, and probably the largest manufacturer of steel nail strips and sheets. Love this little fella
  8. Visited on a very cold, early morning during a Lincolnshire road trip I went on last winter. I was so cold and tired on this particular morning that I managed to forget to put on my shoes before leaving the car, so ended up doing the whole explore in my slippers! However, it was very much worth the numb feet, and I found it hard to drag myself away from the place. This really is a stunning example of a British Victorian Asylum. History: St John’s Asylum, Lincolnshire in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s It was originally built to house just 250 patients but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates where they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service The asylum finally closed its doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed, keeping them safe from demolition. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.
  9. If you like ur pealy paint it's now lookin good SK
  10. Visited with Wevsky and Space Invader Ive found a little history on St Johns mainly after reading bits on various sites across the web and other reports gleaned from various other forums. St Johns Hospital built originally in 1837 as an infirmary to a local workhouse, had various bits "added" to it over the years, started closing down in 2005 and finally came to an end 18/11/2010 when all its staff and services were re-located to Bromsfield Hospital. In its 133-year history, more than 100,000 babies were born inside the hallowed walls of the hospital's famous maternity ward. Right on with some pics And some "Inside" shots Im not normally a fan of Grafitti but I thought the above was pretty dam good Ill apologise if my post is a bit "pic heavy" but I really love snapping away Hope to be doing lots more in the future, my thanks to Wevsky and Space Invader for a great day out !
  11. After seeing a few reports on other forums recently, myself and obscurity decided to take a trip to Essex to check the place out. St Johns Hospital closed in November 2010 when services located to the nearby Broomfield hospital in a £140 million new wing. It used to be the Trust's main maternity unit and children's services. It made for quite an interesting explore, even thou there's not an awful lot of equipment left it was still worth the trip. Cheers to Obscurity for driving. Slightly better condition this part, it was occupational health. Maternity Department Boiler House Maintenance Buildings maintenance records Childrens Services with painted ceiling tiles, and some pretty nice tiled art work on the walls of the kitchen and bathroom areas. Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  12. St.Johns's Hospital Chelmsford Visited with Skeleton Key, Tstranger1066 and Priority 7 The doors of St John's Hospital – where half of Chelmsford's population was born – swing shut for the final time on November 18th, 2010, marking the end of a vast chapter in the town's history. Nurses who have worked at the centre for decades fought back tears as they packed their equipment and mementos into a sea of blue plastic boxes. Pictures signifying a thousand happy memories were stripped from its peeling yellow walls, rows of empty beds pushed through bare corridors and a fleet of trucks delivered everything to the new £148 million wing at Broomfield Hospital. But there are fears the site, now prime for housing, could become a wasteland. Thanks for looking
  13. St John the Baptist church has been shut for a while now. Visited this with hood_mad and captian slow (almost). This church has an interesting but sad history. Locally, common legend has it that the architect that designed the church did so with the altar facing in the wrong direction. Apparently when he realised he hung himself in the bell tower. The church is pretty well sealed, there are some entrances, but as time was tight because we were on our way to do the airfield, we didn't go into the main hall, just the crypt and the boiler room. Entrance to the crypt. Open tomb, you can just see the bones. 3 Long tombs and 1 smaller one. Tombs at the end of the passageway, marble topped. Not much here, but the crypt is really spooky, lol. J.