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Found 16 results

  1. The Explore Explored this place many times and always seems to have something new for me each time. The winter has not been kind to the place this year so thought I would pop another little report on to show what the old girl is looking like at the moment. The History Briefly, the abandoned St Joseph’s College, Upholland is a former Roman Catholic seminary, situated at Walthew Park, Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building were laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated following the announced closure of the College which saw the last students leave in 1992. The seminary was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O’Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St. John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992.
  2. The Explore This is one that's been on my list for a long while now but always been sealed or never got around to going up there. On hearing it was open again we popped to have a look. I'm sure more reports will come from here as there was 14 other explorers here at the time! Like a Xmas urbex get together Place is fairly trashed now unfortunately and feel we were a few years too late on this one, lots of fire and water damage is slowly destroying this building but a good fun explore with some great people anyhow The History St Joseph’s Orphanage was opened in 1872 on the site of an ancient alms house, and St Joseph’s Hospital for the Sick Poor followed five years later. They were built by wealthy widow Maria Holland, who gave £10,000 at a time when Preston had one of the worst mortality rates in the country, due to poor housing and low-paid mill workers. St Joseph’s Orphanage cared for 971 children before it closed in 1954. Run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy, the orphanage was the first welfare provider for Roman Catholic girls in Preston, taking in up to 60 youngsters at a time in two dormitories. After its closure, the top floor of the orphanage continued to serve as accommodation for the nuns who worked in St Joseph’s Hospital, known locally as Mount Street Hospital. The hospital held collections to help pay for health care for poor patients. During the First and Second World Wars, they tended injured soldiers and, over the years, tens of thousands of babies were born at the hospital’s maternity unit. Legendary performer George Formby died at the hospital following a heart attack on March 6, 1961. The hospital closed when the last sisters left nursing in 1982. It later became a care home, which closed down more than ten years ago.
  3. The Visit Considered this one in the past but lots of activity next door at the tile shop so difficult to access unnoticed at times. Passing on an early morning we thought we'd have a quick look about. Lasting memory of this place is the pigeon sh*t! Never seen it so deep anywhere The History Built in 1861, St Joseph's Catholic Church is a grade II listed building on the fringe of Wigan town centre and was the Sunday school of a certain George Formby. It's been closed since 1995 and is a burden around the church's neck. They (and Wigan Council) are hoping someone comes along and takes it under their wing in this quarter's redevelopment of the mills and waterfront area. An example of quite how deep the bird poo is in here
  4. The Visits I'm sure this forum is awash with St. Joes reports but I thought as I'm new it would be rude of me not to post a few shots from my explores of this wonderful building. They are from a number of different visits ranging from June to October this year. Most have been very early morning visits hence the sunrise shots, personally I think this is the nicest time to enjoy this building. There are a good few generic shots everyone has seen before but I just love the place so couldn't help myself The History St Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable. The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block.
  5. Visited with a few peeps from here one early Sunday morning. We got to the site at about 5am and then met headed up to the roof to cook some breakfast, was so nice sitting there watching as the light started to come over the view. We spent about 3 hours there and only covered about 10% of the place, a revisit will be needed. Also the sausage butty wasn't that bad either. History St Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable. The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block.
  6. History: Briefly, the abandoned St Joseph’s College, Upholland is a former Roman Catholic seminary, situated at Walthew Park, Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building were laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated following the announced closure of the College which saw the last students leave in 1992. The seminary was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O’Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St. John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992. Explore: I visited here with loocyloo (shout to her for letting me crash at hers and being the designated driver), redhunter, whynotdiex, and a couple of non-members. we arrived here pretty early and under dakrness made our entry. Now, we had a little bit of time to kill, so what better way that to do it with a fry up on the roof? Nothing kicks off a day of exploring better than a bacon buttie! Soon enough the sun was up and we were off to take some pictures! Bumped into about 8 other explorers here - unfortunately I'm not sure if any are members:confused: We had a real laugh, and no doubt this was topped off with a brilliant security encounter. We were on the roof shooting and heard a car arrive, and in record time a head popped up from the access hatch - "youre not supposed to be here" he muttered, and after a brief moment we said we'd leave. We packed up out gear and descended the ladder only to find he'd wondered off, so we took that as an opportunity to spend another hour inside shooting! Definitely one of my top explores, in a beautiful location with some top company! I was told the sinks were sealed, but coming all this way I had to go and check for myself. An awkward climb through a smashed window led into the courtyard, and I thought I'd go check it out before dragging all my gear out there. Realising they were sealed i now had the job of getting back through this smashed window, and with glass left in the frame it made it awkward. I opted for a heard-first approach and hoped for the best. Lucky, loocyloo was on hand to document the whole situation on my camera. It's safe to say she got a bit snap happy, as 2 minutes later I had over 40 pictures of me attempting to get through a window! To finish off, a group shot in the courtyard! As always, thanks for reading!
  7. The History St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O'Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883. The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. St Joseph’s, usually referred to by its students simply as Upholland, was the main seminary serving the North West of England. The sister seminary at Ushaw provided the same services for the North East. Both institutions housed both a junior and senior seminary. The junior seminaries provided secondary education in a semi-monastic environment to boys aged 11 to 18 who wished to pursue the priesthood. The senior seminary taught adults philosophy and theology as they prepared for priesthood. The Visit Visited the first time with Loocyloo, Merryprankster and 2 none members!. To start the Alarms were hell! Ear plugs would be highly recommended if you are planning on going! Been here quite a few times over the past few months winter has hit this place hard tbh! Enjoy! I made a virtual 360 tour of this room click here to see it Sorry for the mix match images this was over a few visits with 3 cameras! also going to be doing more 360s if i get enough positive respone
  8. Intro. Ok got bored being in all time has you do so decided to go out and explore. Wanted to do this for quite a while so went down solo (At First). When i got there was checking out the place and access etc when i found it a damn car pulled up and sat for ages right outside. So grabbed some grub and heading back where i spotted a lady right near access and was having a nosy lol. So i introduced myself would be rude not to. Turned out it was Hedgie with another person i didn't catch name sorry just coming out. After some good pointers i realized its way to much just for me solo and with night upon me so called for reinforcements. An hour later my friends turned up Tina and tony. Then off we went. All i can say was this was one of the most fun and awesome places i have been for a while. Loved it and hope you like pics. History. St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s,The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House. St Joseph�s is a Grade II listed former orphanage and maternity hospital developed as a sequence of buildings from 1872 through to the 1950�s. The original building is a two storey, red brick building in a high gothic style with a tower over the original entrance. The later 1930�s and 1950�s buildings are in a simple modernist style in brick. The buildings are arranged around a courtyard but one that is hidden from view despite its central location. The buildings are an important landmark and a significant part of Preston�s Victorian heritage and social history. Although the buildings have consent for conversion to residential use they have been vacant for a number of years. The site is in private ownership. Also this is the place george formby died. Here is an interesting link about this. http://www.blogpreston.co.uk/2013/0...george-formbys-death-and-his-link-to-preston/ Enjoy the pics Thanks for looking. Hope you enjoyed.
  9. Hello again! Possibly the most documented urbex building in the UK so theres no need for history, just check out the hundreds of other reports. I've legit done this place to death, seen every part other than a few rooms which are always locked. St Josephs hosted a recent meet up myself and -Raz- attended and that was a quality day with Mars Lander, Hank Moody and others. A personal Favourite photo, can anyone spot Raz? Photos from various explores; If you got this far, thanks for reading
  10. This is the first of two visits with the tour guide, also known as Urblex. Thanks for getting me into this place bud. Really enjoyed both visits. Really early one this which suffered from bad light as a result. An interesting entry point which the eagle eye of Urblex had spotted. The building is a maze of connecting corridors and rooms, with a mix and match of features. Pretty filthy inside with the lower levels containing a flooded corridor with is raw to say the least. On the other end their is the medical section up stairs and the chapel. It had been on the list from the start and did not disappoint. St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s, and is now the Mount Street Nursing Home. The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House. DEATH OF A CHARITABLE LADY – HANDSOME LOCAL BEQUETHS In our obituary to-day we announce the death of Mrs. Maria Holland, of Bushell-place, at the age of 72. The deceased lady had suffered for some time past from the natural ailments of advanced age, and succumbed to her illness yesterday week. She was a lady possessed of considerable means, and was noted for great liberality, especially among the Roman Catholic community of the town, of which she was a member. She built and largely endowed St Joseph’s Orphanage, in connection with which she has recently caused to be erected a hospital for the sick and dying…. Thanks for looking.
  11. Sunday morning and I'm at a loose end... Perfect excuse for a revisit! I've been meaning to get back here for some time, so seeing a few pics pop up on Facebook, I bunged the gear in the car and was off!! Definitely one of my favourite UK explores! Proper nice corridors, wheelchairs, theatres and a real nice chapel! Everything ya want really!! ... ... ... Thanks for lookin in!
  12. Brief History of St Joseph's Seminary St Joseph's College, Upholland is a Former Roman Catholic seminary, situated at Walthew Park, Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building was laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated. St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O'Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. The first Junior Seminary of the Diocese was founded at St Edward's College in 1842 as a Catholic 'classical and commercial school' under the direction of the secular clergy and was established in Domingo House, a mansion in Everton. Its President for the next forty years was to be Monsignor Provost John Henry Fisher. When the Junior Seminarians moved to St Joseph's the school was taken over by the Christian Brothers (who also ran St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell) and continues to this day and now serves as the Liverpool Cathedral Choir School. In recognition of the heritage owed to St Edward's College one of the two chapels at Upholland was consecrated as the St Edward the Confessor Chapel. Along with the other main seminary in the north of England, Ushaw candidates for the priesthood studied and were ordained at the college. Up until the second Vatican Council boys as young as 11 years of age entered the Junior Seminary before progressing to the senior Seminary at 18. In 1972 following the changes of Vatican 2 the two junior seminaries of St Joseph's and Ushaw merged at Upholland, and in 1975, with declining numbers of men from Ireland offering themselves for the (now) Archdiocese of Liverpool the Senior seminary moved to Ushaw. St Joseph's continued to offer boarding school education for boys considering a vocation until 1987. Following the end of the seminary training and boarding education St Joseph's became home to the Northern Institute and was used as a retreat and conference centre for the Archdiocese under the leadership of Msgr John Devine. The election of Archbishop Patrick Kelly saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether and the property was sold to Anglo International who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed RC Seminary to 92 apartments, with 220 new build enabling units. The major controversies of the decision were the ongoing financial viability of St Joseph's (it had just started to make a small surplus under Devine's management) and the sale and disposal of the art and artefacts in the college, much of which had been donated by various parishes and people of the Archdiocese who were not offered their donations back. My visit to St Joseph’s Seminary - Visited with Venustas After an unsuccessful visit a few weeks before myself and Venustas just could not resist the pull of St Joes and we just had to try again. So, an early start was arranged and before we knew it we was back! Now this place is notorious for the ‘on the ball’ security and even more for the high pitched killer alarm. Trust me when I say that when that thing goes off all you want to do is curl up in a ball with your hands over your ears whimpering for your mummy. It sure is an assault on your eardrums. This place has been classed as a suicide explore due to the fact that going here you know you have a high chance of being caught at some point. So that said, the main goal of this trip other than getting the photos we needed was to not set off the alarm or get caught by security. We was in just as the light was starting to flood in through the windows which was great timing as St Joes really needs light to help show it’s real beauty. So after a 5 minute break to catch our breath we headed off into the maze of hallways and rooms checking for sensors as we went and started snapping photos of this amazing location. Here are a few photos of some of the hallways. This place is full of hallways of all shapes and sizes. Now, one of the first rooms we stumbled across that we had seen in other reports was the ‘Red Room’ After taking a few snaps in the Red Room we moved on walking down even more hallways and checking out dozens of small rooms that looked like dorm rooms. Each room looked identical with a small fire and some type of storage for clothing and belongings. Then we found the ‘Squirrel Room’ aptly named as there is a dried out squirrel on the window sill. By the looks of it i would say that it was a male! Now, just after the last photo above was taken we realised that we was locked in the room! We had heard the door shut behind us but thought nothing of it as doors have handles on right? Wrong! this one did not. Instantly we both thought … Oh Shit! As we was on the 2nd floor and the window not being one that can open the door was our only exit so we quickly realised unless we can get this door open we will either have to damage the door panel to get out or do the unthinkable and call security! Neither of which we wanted to do. We looked where the handle should have been and could see the small square metal bar that goes into the handle. It had been pushed through and almost of out the other side. We started to look for something that we could grip it with but crumbly plaster and peeling paint was of no help! Then, Venustas pulled out two £1 coins and with his what i call a Gorilla grip used them on the bar like a pair of tweezers. As he twisted the bar I pulled on the hanger attached to the door and to our joy we was free! Thank goodness the latch was not rusted! Oh and Venustas’s gorilla grip. So after a few moments of laughter and joking about what had just happened we move on through this monster of a location. We knew the main areas that we wanted to see but trying to find them soon became apparent that luck would play a huge part in if we was successful. Today lady luck seemed to be on our side when we stumbled across the library which has the spiral staircase. So after a few snaps of the stairs up we went. This room was my favourite from the day, it was quite, out of the way and it held a nice calm feeling to it which was the perfect place to take a break and plan out our next route to explore. It was obviously part of the library below as you will see there are shelves on both sides of the room that would have been full of books. Also, there is a ladder to help you get the books you need and a study table. This table I named the ‘guestbook’ as previous explorers have added their name to it. I am now proud to say that ours are also part of the guestbook. So after walking down a few more corridors and checking even more rooms lady luck struck again. Out of nowhere the dorm room appeared. I have always loved the look of this room from the day I looked at it on someone's report. It is nowhere near as in good condition as it use to be from older reports but this place still has a beauty to it. The names of the people who used this dorm are still on the cubicle fronts. So after grabbing a few shots we decided it was time to move on if we wanted to cover as much as possible before we had to go. After walking around for a while we came across this staircase that connected on to a room with a crazy checkerboard ceiling. Just to the right of the stairs was the study hall. Next up we found what we thought must be classed as a small chapel but we might be wrong. This room was small but really nice in decor. Now with us finding the small chapel we knew we had to be close to the holy grail that is the main Chapel. The main chapel was our end goal as we knew that when we enter that area there is a high chance that we would set of one of the remote sensors and all hell would break loose on our eardrums. We decided that we was happy with the amount we had seen and said lets go. So after about 10 minutes of looking for the chapel entry we found it, held our breath and stepped in ……. wait for the attack of sound ….. any minute now …. NOTHING! Not a peep. Well that was a surprise, so we started snapping away before security arrived. We said to each other get the shots we need before we get escorted off. So off to work we went, snapping shots from all angles and we even found the bell tower. Now to our utter surprise of no alarm also came the surprise of no security presence arriving we was in total amazement. With all shots taken that we wanted from this area we left and headed off to a less obvious area to way up our next move. We knew we was happy with what we had seen so far but decided to walk a few more corridors before leaving this amazing place. We even walked the cellars that was used for storage and from the evidence we found brewing their own wine and spirits! After that we decided it was time to go. The day had gone better than we could have hoped for, we had not set off the alarm and no security had collared us. We made it to our exit point packed up our gear and headed out. A few moments later Venustas wanted to get some external shots and we knew that security is right at the point where we wanted to take the photo. We both agreed and said sod it, we walked right out into plain sight of security and the CCTV and got the shots we needed then turned round and walked down the path. 30 seconds later security arrived in his car. We got the usual speech and then went merrily on our way after an amazing 5 hours inside exploring. Crazy getting ourselves caught right? Probably, but the external definitely finished the day off. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of St Joseph’s Seminary on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/119757413@N07/sets/72157646885632357/ Final thoughts St Josephs is by far the best explore I have been on and I feel it will take some beating without leaving the UK for places such as France & Belgium. Don’t get me wrong there are some great locations within the UK but St Joseph’s had so much to offer and the sheer size of this place can keep you coming back time and again and each time you would definitely see something new. So I don’t think I should say farewell to St Joes but see you soon! Thanks for reading, Dugie
  13. UK St Josephs Seminary... June '13

    Friday night and a text comes through... 'Shag, we're goin EPIC tomorrow! Get yourself up here for 3 am, St Jo's could be a goer!!' Plans for a jaunt up to Ushaw are immediately thrown out of the window!! If theres a chink in the armour then this could be an unforgettable one... After the briefest of slumber I'm hotfooting it up the M6 to meet up with the crew, namely Mars Lander (who?!), Lucky Pants and PROJECT MAYHEM and after a quick brew we're off! I was giving this one 60/40 (odds stacked against us!)... Well sod the odds! We're in!! It's a bit gloomy so we head up, up, UP... And find the observatory View from the top... As we descend, it all unfurls... We even find a stuffed bird display!! And other artefacts... Corridor aceness aplenty... And general 'epicness'... Moments after this last shot was taken we we're ousted by the LOUDEST alarm known to man! It wasnt long and we were homeward bound... Unforgettable?! Most definitely!! Thanks for looking...
  14. St. Joseph's Missionary College Splored with SK, Trog and Peaches The St Joseph's Foreign Missionary Society (Mill Hill Missionaries) was founded at Mill Hill in 1866 by Father Herbert Vaughan (1832-1903). It was the first catholic missionary society to be founded in England. Ordained at the age of 22, Vaughan determined to devote himself to missionary work. Not strong enough himself for the vigours of overseas work, he aimed to achieve this via the establishment of a missionary training college; he was encouraged in his plans by his friend Father (later Cardinal) Manning (1808-1892) and by Cardinal Wiseman (1802-1865). In 1863 Vaughan embarked on a tour of Central and South America and of California to raise funds for the new College. A year after his return to England in 1865, he was able to rent a house in Mill Hill about ten miles north of London. Under conditions of some poverty, the house operated as the new missionary training school, that of St Joseph's Society for Foreign Missions. Following further fund raising initiated by Archbishop Manning in 1868, the building of a new college on a freehold site nearby was completed in 1871; at the time it served a community of 34 students. Later that year, the first missionary endeavour of St Joseph's was realised. Rome assigned the evangelization of the recently freed black population of the southern states of the USA. To this end, Vaughan himself travelled to America with his first four missionary priests. This led to the successful establishment of a mission in Baltimore, out of which developed, by 1892, a separate society, that of the Josephite Fathers. In 1872 Vaughan became Bishop of Salford and left Mill Hill though he remained Superior General of the Missionary Society, a cause that was always to be close to his heart. No Winter splore would be complete without a snowball fight
  15. Built in 1875 and is part of a complex of buildings that was once an orphanage dedicated to St Michael which opened in 1869. Splored with SK, Tommo and Klempner The floor is insulated with years of pigeon shit and you really wouldn't want to go the the scaffold supported tower either
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