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Found 99 results

  1. Following on from our escapades here is another report from The Derpy Rotten Scoundrels Euroderp Tour earlier this year. Having spent the previous day dicking about by Lake Como, swimming in the lake, the lads got their broga on, whilst Disco Kitten put everyone to shame with her epic yoga skills. fortytwo went jungleering and spent the day battling beasts in the wilderness and arrived back after a fight with a snake. Deciding we were on the move the next day we set up camp in a derelict house looking out over the lake. Chilled out with beer and did the only to do when your Euroderping and your derp has an awesome white wall, slammed Indian Jones and the Temple of Doom on the projector and settled in for the night! Our plan was to head for the Holy Grail of NPU, having visited previously I was still excited about the chance of a revisit. So we loaded up the limo and Zsa Zsa and headed off with a plan to hit the Animal Testing Facility on the way. This is another place that is proper trashed but good for a mini derp adventure. I have no idea of its full name, or where it is as I do an excellent job of sleeping as soon as Im in the car. Its a nice little walk in and there is still some interesting stuff in there to see. I've gleaned a little bit of history from some dude who went in 2016. The place belonged to a Swiss Company who were apparently big in the animal testing industry, they moved to this site and rented the building, however when the rental contract ran out they didn't renew the contract and it fell into disrepair. The land it is built on is partly poisoned, due to there being a chemical site their previously and isn't likely to be cleaned up anytime soon. A couple of years after the facility closed it was hit by a fire, causing acrid fumes to permeate the local area. Firefighters arrived and found evidence the fire had been started deliberately but were able to stop the fire fairly quickly. Although they contained the fire, the whole site had to be checked due to rumours of the facility being occupied by refugees and concerns over the local kids playing in the buildings. The facility still has the animal operating/autopsy table in place and there is lots of medical equipment lying around, lamps, autoclaves and a gloved box unit. Anyway here's a few pics (all from my phone as I lost the ones I took on my camera ) Thanks for looking
  2. Solo jaunt. I'd looked at this a year back, but was too tired waiting for security to move away when stood at the fence. So having done another explore nearby earlier, I made another trek up to Harpur Hill. I'm well known for being a huge fan of railways and trains in particular, considering this is where my roots in exploring and much of my childhood are. That said I snub stuff like DMUs/EMUs and Underground stock, simply because they don't have the same appeal as the rusting, decayed hulk of a loco. I'm sure all of you can agree. So why did I make the effort with this? Well, three things: I've photographed a lot of the withdrawn Underground stock that's being shipped to Booth's in Rotherham, so that piqued my interest a bit. Secondly, now the last of the 1983 stock has been moved after 15+ years in open storage from South Harrow to Booth's, these have become EXTREMELY rare so it's worth capturing this whilst it's around in such a photogenic state. Lastly, I may as well have a look if I'm in the area. Comparing to pictures from a few years ago, a lot of the stock that was stored here has been moved away and presumably scrapped, leaving three driving cars: one outside, two inside. As far as I'm aware the stock is used in bomb testing of some kind, and evacuation techniques in light of the 7/7 bombings. Maybe. It's a health and safety testing site so it makes sense. Already somewhat knackered from earlier, I dragged myself up to Harpur Hill, and all was quiet. No security, no sign of activity across the site. Get over the fences and you're in, nice and easy. So that's what I did. If I'm not mistaken, this is the ex-Cockfosters or Acton stock that's moved here. After years of open storage and vandalism, the carriages have been completely sabotaged inside and out, but nevertheless are chock full of photogenic features. To paraphrase my favourite band, I can think of no greater caption than "Welcome to the scene of the crash"... Despite being graffed up inside, it was interesting to see the cabs virtually intact and untouched. From experience these are often the places where (guilty as charged, I did once as a kid) people often nick stuff for souvenirs and the like. Either that or they smash them up. Dead end The bomb tunnel Not in service To conclude, it's not that interesting a site but it's worth sharing. Sadly I feel I'm clutching at straws now that en-masse withdrawals, scrapping and storage of locos that for decades were commonplace have long since ended. Long gone are the days of asking permission from the yard foreman to look round a depot to take pictures of the derelict stock left there. Long gone are the days when you can easily sneak in undetected and not have to face the wrath of a bolshy prick who you have the misfortune of being caught by, notwithstanding more CCTV, formidable fencing and most of all, the threat of a fine and prosecution by BTP. The answer is yes, a report I posted on 28 in 2011 led to BTP knocking at my door and fining me £50 for trespass. Not a lot relative to what it could have been, but still I was out of pocket all because I posted it publicly. True, there are still some true goldmines left on the continent, the prime examples of which are Falkenberg/Elster and Istvantelek in Germany and Hungary respectively, but nothing in the UK anymore. Not unless it's covered by CCTV and forbids photographers most of the time. Life goes on though, eh? Love and best wishes as always, TBM x
  3. Had a day round North Wales afew weeks ago with Urblex, great day as usual mate. This place was the second explore of the day. The place is quite trashed to be honest, reminding me of a mix of Cookridge and Billinge Hospitals. An enjoyable little mooch all in all, worth a look if your in the area. We came across hundreds of needles quite early on during the visit which had us on edge abit. Something to bear in mind for anybody who visits later in the day or early evening. Holywell Union workhouse was erected in 1838-40 at the south of Holywell and was designed by John Welch. The Poor Law Commissioners authorised an expenditure of £6,200 on its construction which was to accommodate 400 inmates. The workhouse design followed the popular cruciform or "square" layout with separate accommodation wings for the different classes of inmate (male/female, infirm/able-bodied etc.) radiating from a central hub. To the rear, a central three-storey range connected to the central supervisory hub who observation windows gave a clear view over all the inmates yards. The main accommodation blocks ran north and south and had cross-wings at each end. In 1930, the workhouse passed into local council control and became a Public Assistance Institution. In 1948, the former workhouse became part of the National Health Services as Lluesty General Hospital. In the final years Lluesty was used to provide geriatric care up until its closure in 2008 when the towns new community hospital opened. In Febuary 2011 it was sold to developers for £275.000. The site is allocated for a development of 70 houses but as the original work houses and chapel are grade II listed, they cannot be demolished. 1 2/3 4 5/6 7 8 9 10/11 12 13 14/15 16 17 18/19 20 21 22/23 Thanks for Looking
  4. History: founded in 1836 and specializing in manufacture files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry, they grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley & Sons survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Explore: This site was 2nd on the agenda for my day in Sheffield with Miz Firestorm, Duggie & Alex. Short walk from the courts and we were there, somewhat interesting entry (although i can't go into details ) and we were in! Had a nice, undisturbed wonder round here - stunning place I must add, really enjoyed it here. I'll upload the rest of the pictures from the day once I get round to editing, but until then, have these.. As always, thanks for looking!
  5. Next set from this amazing place Cheers The Baron
  6. Germany Paperworks, Germany - June 2015

    One of my favourite decay locations ! Love the colours of the machine rooms so much.
  7. The turbine steamship TSS Dover - later renamed the Earl Siward, Sol Express and finally the Tuxedo Royale - was built in 1965 as a roll-on/roll-off ferry and spent much of her later life as a floating nightspot beneath the Tyne Bridge,The Tuxedo closed in 2006 and owners Absolute Leisure went into administration three years later. In its heyday, thousands of people partied aboard the boat and its sister vessel: Visited here with Fat Panda after a rather boring hospital in Durham. When we arrived the gap to the boat was a little bigger than expected and instead of jumping and falling in the water/sludge beneath us we found some wood and bodged a bridge together We spent a while having a look around and although its wrecked in there it still makes for a interesting mooch! Our visit was cut short due to secca busting us as he heard us on his patrol, after we stepped off the boat he threw our bodged bridge into the water Cheers for looking
  8. I had my first look around some Victorian drains this week. Massive thanks to Adders for taking me, extreme_ironing, and a friend visiting from Germany to see these epic bits of infrastructure. I probably wouldn't have ventured down without his expertise and knowledge to be honest. I've also used his and Ojay's previous comprehensive reports as a reference for some factual information so cheers lads. Oh yeah, and thanks to everyone that came along for helping me light the place as my torch batteries were dead, I really need to learn from this as it's not the first time I've found myself underground trying to use my iPhone as a torch! Not Pro. These were the cleaner bits of the network, manageable in just wellies although 'clean' probably isn't the best description. Having said that I was expecting the smell to be far worse than it was but it didnt bother me one little bit whilst down there. We visited 3 separate sections in one evening and saw some epic bits, it's amazing that these old tunnels have survived so long, are still being used today and for the foreseeable future. An amazing feat in engineering and construction. Lucky Charms, officially known as Clapham storm relief, serves the Southern High Level No.1/Putney & Clapham extension & Balham Sewers. It was designed towards the end of the 19th century (approximately 1870s at a guess) by Joseph Bazalgette, the chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works. His major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames. An old worker's cart left behind since construction took place Epic Engineering South West Storm Relief, up to the River Effra. Part of the same network as Lucky Charms but further along There were some nasty pieces of shit in the River Effra, and I'm not just referring to Adders Our German friend with camera equipment way too expensive for places like this I told Roxanne she didn't have to put on the red light but she insisted River Fleet Outfall Chamber, which deals with flows from the storm relief and the Fleet Mainline when at capacity. The Fleet storm relief was built in 1875 in order to give extra capacity to the Fleet Sewer The Fleet Mainline, it was seriously hot and steamy in here for all the wrong reasons. This was the only pic that came out ok for that reason. Abandoned machinery left to rust Penstock mechanism for the chamber below that feeds into the Low Level 1 interceptor. These allow works to shutdown the flow to certain places using the giant flaps pictured below. Apparently if you fell down here you would end up at Abbey Mills pumping station (albeit dead and smelling of shit). The outfall chamber, this fills up with Thames sludge as the Fleet is tidal. A mix of sewage, mud, silt and whatever else, probably best not to know in fact. Luckily it was only ankle deep when we were inside but it can rise up as high as the gantry in front of these flaps when at high tide. These giant 4 flaps control the flow into the main outfall chamber, must've been a pretty amazing feat to get these lumps down here back in the day Two small flaps behind here control the flow from the Fleet Storm Relief rejoining the Combined Sewer Overflow These make the most amazing boom when you lift them and let them clang Thanks for looking
  9. Ukrane Chernobyl Hospital June 2015

    Day 1 of a very memorable trip, wanted to do this for so long and as such the opportunity arose a few weeks back to make it happen. With it being very short notice, I went on my own and joined a public tour for 2 days, with 5 other folk, only 1 other person taking pictures !! time was limited in each location as we tried to cram in as many different locations as possible. As such I only had approx 45 mins in here............. first of a few reports to follow of each place i thought worthy of a report Cheers The Baron
  10. Seems as if the tour bus is in town, and I'm the last off:D The History: I'm sure everyone knows already, and most people won't bother reading (I wouldn't blame you) but have some history anyway.. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening On the morning of 23 May 2010 a ‘Service of Thanks’ was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to “Take a Trip Down Memory Laneâ€, sign a memory wall [3] and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganization was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the best burns units in the country. It was also home to the Royal Center for Defense Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans. The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war. There were also difficulties when Jeremy Clarkson went to the hospital to give gifts to the wounded serviceman. A report published by the House of Commons Defense Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign and praised the clinical care provided to military patients. The Explore: Now it's not often I get to say this, but I actually got a lay in on an explore - 7am! But we were up and out sharpish, and heading over to Selly. We got there, and after pondering several entry methods for a while, we finally decided. Except, it involved a hell of a lot of bushes, brambles and a few stinging nettles, but eventually we were in! We were heading towards the morgue when we heard voices.. had we been spotted already?! Thankfully not, and it was other explorers. Quick introductions were made, and after a stupid climb through a very awkward entry point we were in! Decided to have a look round the main hospital after, and eventually to the other buildings.. big mistake! Within about 3 minutes we'd tripped 4 alarms. We snapped a few quick pictures, and made an exit. Good timing really, as by the time we'd got back to the car and were heading home, police were all over it.. lucky escape:thumb Better get on with some pictures.. As always, thanks for taking the time to view this. Cheers guys
  11. Today I´d like to present an abandoned workshop for streetcars. I´ve visited it several times so far and I´m still fascinated by this place. History: The old workshop was built in the years 1913/14 due to the increasing traffic of street cars. The landmark of the area is the old clocktower, in which a huge water tank is hidden. Reportedly, the apprentices who had their own apprentice workshop on the grounds used the old tank as swimming pool during hot summer days... The grounds have been abandoned for more than a decade. Now, an estate company has bought the area and is planning to establish a housing area. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  12. Decided it was time to get out exploring again so sorted out a visit to Selly Oak as its been on my list for ages. Met up with two other explorers on the day and had a good look around. Getting into the mortuary is a bit risky but so worth it! History The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King's Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening. On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Pictures Mortuary Outpatients X-Ray Main Hospital More pictures up here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarthomas/sets/72157654300167915
  13. After the mega success at the nearby Tonedale Mill myself and OverArch headed down the road after a quick late lunch. I had been to this fantastic place twice previously but it was Mr. OverArch's first visit and I think he enjoyed it quite a lot. Even though a lot more graffiti has appeared inside and it's all looking a little bit more tired than I remember from my first visit, I never tire of shooting this place. It deserves it's place in UE folklore as one of the best ever. All shot handheld with my 30mm prime lens, a piece of kit I really should use more often. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157651875818383
  14. Evening:D The Explore: Found myself up north this weekend, and the first place we visited was TG Green. After fighting through some brambles we found ourselves inside - it was a relativity relaxed explore overall, just wondering round at our leisure until we saw a jeep go by.. upstairs in the canteen, we saw it drive past again. security doing a patrol we thought? nope.. just a guy checking some animal traps, thankfully he was off as soon as he'd done that, and we slipped out the way we'd came with no bother at all. Loved this explore, had some amazing company and got some shots I'm reasonable happy with. History: Cornish Kitchen Ware was first produced in 1926 by T.G.Green & Co in Church Gresley, Derbyshire, a county famed for its pottery. The range’s special characteristic came from the lathe-turning process, which cut clean bands through its beautiful blue slip to show the white clay beneath. It was apparently this that inspired the name, since it reminded one T.G.Green & Co. employee of the clear blues and white-tipped waves of Cornwall. The range of kitchen and table ware, from the hooped plates to the iconic storage jars, was an immediate success and remained popular from then on. This inspired T.G.Green & Co. to produce more colours of Cornishware, and more ranges, including the spotted Domino Ware and the cream and green Streamline Ware. In the 1960s, Cornishware was updated by a young designer called Judith Onions. It says much for her skill and sensitivity that this restyled range was embraced as warmly as the originals had been. Over the past 20 years, the range has become highly prized by collectors, with the sighting of both rare original designs and Onions classics the subject of much excitement – and ever-increasing prices. The story was not so happy for T.G.Green & Co. itself, however. It had become increasingly difficult for the Victorian pottery in Derbyshire to compete in the modern age and, after a series of owners had done their best since the Green family sold it in 1964, it finally closed in 2007. Now, my flickr finally decided to work, so I can actually show y'all some pictures.. Now, I must apologies for the quality of this - it's the only external I got, and it's from an iPhone, oops! I was sitting on a ledge, ready to drop out of the site and head home when I turned around and took one last look, camera was already packed away and I didn't want to leave without a memory of the exterior, so this will have to do!
  15. Visited this amazing grade one listed mansion with woopashoopaa and Tom let me just say what a great huge building this is with so many great features. Spend hours here just wondering around this place. The grounds and views are out of this world. With its own chapel in its vast grounds. And that is totally untouched. Complete with electricity the stained glass well these pics don't do the place justice. On with my history and pictures of the place.... Pitchford Hall was built in 1560-70 by William Ottley, the Sheriff of Shropshire. However, the Hall probably has a 14th or 15th century core within the current structure. Originally, the hall was set in around 14 hectares of park and woodland. Attached to the hall is an orangery, which is also registered 'at risk' (Grade II listing). The treehouse (perched in a large lime tree) at Pitchford Hall was built in the 17th century in the same style as the hall itself. It may be the oldest oldest treehouse in the world, and even boasts an oak floor and gothic windows! The estate also contains some good examples of Roman and Victorian baths. Shrewsbury & Atcham Borough Council recently suggested designating Pitchford as a conservation Area, but the idea wasn't popular with locals. Unlike other similar properties, the hall has always remained in private hands - in fact it remained in the same family for many generations. However, in 1992, the then owners - financially hit by their responsibilities as Lloyds names - were forced to sell off the hall and for the first time in its history, the estate was split up. Pitchford Hall and estate are now separately owned. Pitchford Hall Pitchford Hall The condition of the hall is classified by English Heritage as 'fair'. Extensive work was done on the hall in the 19th century. Despite now lying vacant, ongoing work has improved the condition of the roof in particular. Additional work is required to some timber in the East wing and around window frames. Pitchford has also attracted a fair number of celebrities. In 1832, a few years before her coronation, the young Queen Victoria visited the hall with her mother. In her diary, the princess describes the hall as a large "cottage"! Meanwhile, in 1935, the hall also received the Duke of York and his wife - later to become George VI and Queen Elizabeth (the Queen Mother). It is claimed that Prince Rupert sought refuge in the hall's priest hole after the siege of Shrewsbury, while some of his troops hid in the subterranean tunnel on the estate. Pitchford Hall is also reputed to be home to a number of ghosts, including an unknown cavalier and the late owner, Robin Grant. The beatyful chapel..
  16. Visited the nice old hall with friend Tom and woopashoopaa. Was part of the days planned road trip. It took us a while to find this one but managed to get there in the end after thinking it was in another location and trecking through fields of dead sheep . And around various farm houses we eventually found it. Nice big old place and when we scouted it out for a while and made our entrane not long after we heard the alarms screaming so grabbed a few shot and made our way out as the building next door is live and is part of the estate. So here's a few pics I did manage to get and some history... Brogyntyn Hall has stood abandoned for 15 years. It was owned by the Lord Harlech until 2000. Settled in the 1600s the house and its estate once presided over the land as far as the eye can see. The family was one of the great English dynasties and owners of Harlech Castle in North Wales as well. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe. This is when it was used for the telecommunications
  17. This was not only a house but also a atelier carpets and antiques. It is a villa very strange... a part old-style and a part, perhaps renovated, very modern. Welcome to Villa K.
  18. By crikey this is ACE!!!! Everyone who has been down to Tone Mills, the fulling & dyehouse part of what was once the sprawling Fox Bros. woollen mill operation in Wellington that has found it's place in UK exploring folklore as being one of the best mills 'ever' knows that the looming spectre of the much larger Tonedale Mill, the main plant, sat tantalisingly close but more often than not efforts to explore it were thwarted by vigilant security with dogs who liked to run around the buildings, CCTV cameras dotted around the site, nosey neighbours and the repurposed areas to the south. However things have changed a little now and as such myself and OverArch capitalised. How long they will be like this for I do not know. The pair of Autoconers on the top floor are awesome and instantly recognisable, however the engine room, that is something else entirely. It is, by far, the single best room I have stepped foot in anywhere for as long as I can remember. It is a perfect example of purely natural industrial decay that just so happens to house a steam turbine, massive crank and huge engine. I would quite happily go back just to spend a long time sat in that room, if whenever the redevelopment happens they decide to scrap the lot I will be very upset, it's museum-quality. I was even happier to find the engine room on the verge of giving up looking for the way into it, and also after falling into a drain and then afterwards getting covered in coal dust which made the feeling all the more satisfying. The engine room...a bit of a trouser accident might have been had when I pushed the door open. Afterwards we paid a visit to Tone Mills down the road (my 3rd visit, OverArch's 1st), I got a few decent photos so might chuck up a separate post with those in soon. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653728622648
  19. UK RAF stenigot June 2015

    All am going to say about the dishes, is don't walk up them if u want to fall back down! slippery as fuck! ha! The history, RAF Stenigot was a Second World War radar station situated at Stenigot, near Donington on Bain, Lincolnshire. It was part of the Chain Home radar network, intended to provide long range early warning for raids from Luftflotte V and the northern elements of Luftflotte II along the approaches to Sheffield and Nottingham and the central midlands.[1] After the Second World War, the site was retained as part of the Chain Home network. In 1959 it was upgraded to a communications relay site as part of the ACE High program, which involved adding four tropospheric scatter dishes.[2] The site was decommissioned in the late 1980s and was mostly demolished by 1996. The radar tower is a Grade II listed structure and is now used by the RAF Aerial Erector School for selection tests for possible recruits. There is a Memorial at the top to a former RAF Aerial Erector. Now with the pictures... Now some black and white shots, Thanks for looking guys!
  20. Yet another place that nobody seems to visit unlike some of the places that are in a lot worse shape that people flock to like sheep! but anyway made for a eventful mooch with Fat Panda as usual! We arrived here to find the alarms already blaring out and after a helping hand from The_Raw with a bit of improv we found ourselves inside and greeted by the main hall, the rest of the place wasn't in bad shape but nothing of interest really! History stolen from The_Raw Shelton Hospital was custom built and opened in 1845 at Bicton Heath, Shrewsbury. The building was designed by George Gilbert Scott (the great grandfather of the architect who designed Battersea Power Station and the Red Phone Boxes, Giles Gilbert Scott) and William B Moffat. The Asylum was designed in the Corridor Layout that was prolific at the time, being symmetrical so that males and females could easily be segregated. The total cost of the original building came to £17,000. The hospital opened on the 18th of March, 1845, with a capacity of 60 patients. By the opening, the patients requiring treatment had increased to 104. At its peak in 1947, the hospital had 1027 patients. In 1968, a fire ripped through a ward killing 21 of the hospital's most severely mentally ill female patients. Most of the women were asleep and some were unable to move from their beds without assistance. The fire is thought to have been started by a discarded cigarette and it was found that none of the nurses were trained in fire evacuation procedures. A short BBC video from 1968 including interviews with a nurse and the hospital manager after the fire can be seen here: BBC News Player - 1968: Hospital blaze kills 21 Over the years the hospital had its own cricket and football sides, a band, a farm supplying food to the hospital, jobs for patients and even a brewery. In Victorian times these places were designed to be self-contained, it was an institution so people who were admitted there often ended up living there their whole lives. Often the staff also would stay there for years and their children would eventually become staff there so you would have generations of people who had worked at the same place. Some of the treatments carried out there 100 years ago would now be seen as appalling and primitive, but knowledge and understanding of mental health was not what it is today and the public’s attitudes took time to change. The grade II listed building, which has been much adapted over the more than 150 years since it opened, closed as a hospital in September 2012. Its role has now been taken over by a new mental health village nearby called The Redwoods Centre, home to around 200 patients. Shelton has now been bought by Shropshire Homes and is being turned into luxury flats, work starts in September 2014. Cheers for looking
  21. Germany Hunters Hotel (June 2015)

    I visited this place 3 times now and every time I saw new spots Maybe because the keeper is always moving things... Anyway, it's a good place to visit for a few bucks He is a really friendly guy and he always give you something to eat after your visit. You also can rent a room for a night! So here are some pics
  22. A great hotel in Germany. I already visited it about 20 times; I saw the change of it. Most rooms are already trashed or demolished, but there are also some nice spots in there Never go in there without a good mask! Too much mould, it isn't healthy at all. The building burned already two times and that's the reason for the decay. The owner has left Germany and nobody knows what will happen to it. It's a question of time. Now have fun with my new pics! Sorry for the bad quality, I don't know how to upload without loosing quality At first #3 pics I already edited
  23. I think this can be described as a 'hidden gem' for sure. It's kind of like a half-size Clockhouse Brickworks and with just as much stuff to look at. As far as explores go it was the most peaceful chilled out and generally relaxed wander I've had for a long time, helped by the glorious weather. On the way out, we were stopped by one of the buildings caretakers/ex-workers who was relieved to see we were only taking photos and myself and Landie had quite a long chat with him about the site, the buildings they supplied bricks for, and other stuff. He informed us that there is a staff of nine people who work on the land and farm around the site and look after the place. He also said that the planning application for works expires this July and they will be looking to do 'something' with it before it lapses. The Selborne Brickworks was first opened in 1901 and extended later in life to it's current size. It was bought out by Tower Brick & Tile Co. and closed in 2009 as a result of the recession. Like with Clockhouse, when it shut down it did so without notice, so everything was left inside as it was the day it closed. There are still racks of roofing tiles in one of the dryers and bricks in the kilns. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653556365939
  24. 10 Trinity Square is a Grade II listed building in London that was opened by David Lloyd George, then the British Prime Minister, in 1922. The structure was designed by Sir Edwin Cooper and built by John Mowlen & Co in 1922, it was used as the new headquarters of the Port of London Authority. (The PLA is now based on Charterhouse Street in Smithfield.) The building was badly damaged by enemy bombing during the Blitz in World War II and when renovated in the 1970s a functional rectangular office block was built to occupy the central part of the building which was destroyed in the War. Following the relocation of the PLA it became home to the European headquarters of insurance broker Willis Faber Limited. In 2006, 10 Trinity Square was acquired by Thomas Enterprises Inc. It was sold to a partnership of KOP Group and Reignwood in 2010. Reignwood bought out KOP's stake in 2012. It will be developed into a 98 bedroom hotel with over 40 private residences under the Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts brand known as Four Seasons Hotel London at Ten Trinity Square. The building featured in the 2012 James Bond film Skyfall. I came here with gabe, elliot, sirjonnyp and a non member for the first time in June. We'd all had a few beers at the top of 70 Mark Lane and fancied a closer look at this building with 3 or 4 cranes on the roof. We had no idea what the place was used for at the time but it looked like there might be some nice views towards the Tower of London and we weren't wrong. View from 70 Mark Lane Daylight was starting to creep in so we didn't have much time to hang around and vowed to come back again Always time for some silly selfies on top of statues however In November we eventually found ourselves back up top, this time we ventured a bit higher than before with adders, monkey and extreme_ironing in tow Pic by extreme_ironing We found a way inside the monument, this had CCTV inside so we had to tread more carefully here High up in the monument sat this old spiral staircase We then found a way inside the building itself, more epic stair porn was to be seen Most levels of the building were completely stripped except this one being used as offices, the lights were on and laptop screens were lit up so the adrenalin was pumping at this point and we didn't hang around for long Roll on another few weeks and we found ourselves back here with beers checking out the views once more, my pics don't do it justice really, This time with seffy, whodareswins, ojay, monkey, raisinwing, andrewb, sentinel, extreme_ironing, harvey, and a non member friend of mine....erm yeah, quite a few of us in fact! The Shard light display in the distance Thanks for looking
  25. History I dont know of much history of this site but i believe there is a local group restoring these buses, an interesting site and well worth a look around. Some pics Thanks for looking
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