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Found 29 results

  1. Hello all from a longtime, somewhat rusty forum user. Having moved to the Leicester area 18 months or so ago, the exploring itch has well and truly returned. I needz derp. Although there isn't a shortage of it in my area, I do have a shortage of explorers that I know. For someone that doesn't favor solo explores, this is a slight stumbling block. So, whos about and up for wander?
  2. History Chamberlin & Hill Castings Ltd have been manufacturing in Leicester since 1864 and are part of the successful Chamberlin & Hill plc group. They produce castings from 0.1 kgs to 6000 kgs supplying product for turbines, transmissions, oil and gas compressors, earth moving equipment, vacuum pumps and more. Metal types include Ductile Iron (SG Iron), Grey Iron and Alloyed Iron. The company is also a world leader using Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI). Medium castings were done at the Leicester site. Chamberlin & Hill Castings Ltd is the result of two successful foundries joining together. The existing company scattered around various sites company currently has 200 employees and a turnover of over £19 million. With demand for products produced here repidly decreasing the company decided to close at the end of 2016. Explore After seeing this pop up from AndyK! me and @hamtagger decided to venture over to Leicester, picking up @Session9 on the way! After finding our way in relatively quickly, we made our way through the place. The place is a nice size, dotted with various rooms used for offices and laboratories and obviously the workshops and main There is such a vast amount of stuff still here but with only having closed at the end of last year explains why. So much to see and we spent quite a few hours just wandering. Doing what I normally do and venturing off on my own from the others I was happily just looking around the place. I walked up some stairs and needed the loo. I decided to just take some pics of the few rooms upstairs before going so off I went. On the way back I walked down a little alley bit to go to the toilet. On the way I heard someone coughing. I stopped and suddenly realised that they didnt sound at all like anyone I was with so made my way back downstairs. I found a little dark corner and texted hamtagger to ask if he or session9 had just been to the toilet. He replied "No!". Oh great. So I went to find them who were on the other side of the building and get that section done. Convinced that either there was someone else in there or they were playing a joke on me we actually got round alot of the place. It was only when we went back upstairs to do the offices that upon glancing outside we saw secca walking about glancing up at the windows. The offices were only right above his office. Well, we stayed put and went right to the top. We heard him come up stairs, have another pee quite loudly and when he walked up nearly had a heart attack when he walked in to the room and saw us all stood there. Pretty friendly bloke though and kindly allowed us to walk out the front gate All in all a great explore, definitely one I would return to. Anyway, enough of my rambling and on to the pics. 1 2 3 4 I didnt take a crooked pic, I just liked how the labels were wonky 5 6 7 8 9 10 A lot of machines here bearing the same logo for Wadkin, the same company I believe which closed some years ago too also from Leicester. 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Thanks for looking!
  3. The Explore As far as the history goes this is still one of my all time favourite explores this.. to walk around a building were one of the most important inventions in the world happened was quite special.. unfortunately though the place is pretty trashed nowadays but a big varied site none the less. The History The Engineering site at Whetstone, near Leicester was opened in 1941 as a facility to engineer and test early Jet engines. The site was initially setup by jet engine inventor Frank Whittle's company Power Jets ltd. Their workshops produced a number of experimental jet engines. However In 1944 Power Jets was Nationalized and Frank whittle left the company in protest at his lack of control. Within two years the decision was taken to centralize research and new facilities were built at the National Gas Turbine establishment in Farnborough. The Whetstone site then passed into the control of the General Electric Company. By the late 1940s it became an important centre for the rapidly growing nuclear industry. The Atomic Power Division produced specialist components, prefabricated parts and control systems for the early nuclear industry. Research was at the cutting edge and The work carried out at whetstone fed into the program that created the worlds first commercial scale nuclear reactor. It went on to play an important role in the construction and development of the Magnox Reactors. Computer research was also an important part of the work conducted at Whetstone. In the late 1950's the site had two Early DEUCE computers. These were used for the calculation of engineering problems, conducting projections and simulations. As well as Writing programs for use in nuclear controls and further research into early computer science. Not a nice sign to stumble upon in the basement... These things went about 50ft into the ground, no idea what they were for and the bottom of them were flooded so couldn't get right down
  4. After a curry and some beers with mates I decided to go climb something on my way home, as you do. The first site was a fail so I headed for the nearest crane and ended up here. I've always wanted to get up above Leicester Square but the insane amount of police everywhere always put me off. Tonight I didn't give a shit and it was quite amusing looking down on the police totally oblivious to me above them. Raw 1 - Police - Nil.....on this occasion at least 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking kids
  5. Random quick visit to this place, didn't get in much of it but a nice little visit. History - Corah & Sons was a former hosiery and textiles business, founded by Nathaniel Corah in 1824. St Margaret's works opened in 1865 - 66 and closed in the 1990s. Today parts of the factory are still used by hosiery and textile companys, but much of the factory is unused. The chimney has gone and there was a fire in April 2012, it is not a listed building. The sculpture of St Margaret which formerly stood above the main entrance, was removed too St Margaret's chapel in 1995.
  6. History The site on which the Park International Hotel now sits on was originally occupied by a footwear warehouse, for Freeman Hardy & Willis Ltd. The site, like others across the city, also included lodgings for the company director and caretaker. By 1940, however, the warehouse had been completely destroyed by the Luftwaffe, after one of the heaviest bombing raids Leicester would ever experience during the war. Since much of the city was damaged in the aftermath, and more important redevelopment projects took priority, the site remained an abandoned wasteland up until 1955. The area was purchased and cleared of debris, although it wasn’t until the early 1970s that the main tower would appear on the city’s horizon. Like others at the time, such as Hallam Towers in Sheffield, the new property was designed to be a modern development that paid tribute to an era of prosperity. Nonetheless, as with most hotels, it changed hands several times throughout its lifetime and each time it was renamed accordingly. It is estimated that it remained as the Park International Hotel for the longest period of time. Over the years the hotel was a popular venue and it attracted many guests from other parts of the country. It was perhaps for this reason why the lower levels of the hotel were used to house the Leicester Exhibition Centre from the 1980s onward. The building finally closed down in 2009 owing to its declining reputation and inadequate structural integrity. During the 2000s there were several incidents where concrete had fallen from the structure onto the street below. Despite plans to repair the decaying premises, so that it could perhaps be converted into residential or student accommodation, no plans were ever approved. As the building has stood in a dilapidated state for many years, it has become too dangerous for property redevelopers to enter. Future plans now involve demolishing the site, to make way for new innovative city projects. Our Version of Events With only a few hours before Punk had to retire for the night *curfew – cough*, we decided that we’d still have time for a quick raid on the old Park International Hotel site. We’d heard rumours that access was particularly interesting so it caught our attention almost instantly. We’d also been itching to see Leicester from somewhere high. On the whole access wasn’t particularly difficult, but it was definitely entertaining. Inside, the hotel is absolutely fucked, so that was a little disappointing. Nevertheless, the rooftop view from the tower didn’t disappoint at all. From up there we could see for miles; it was just a shame we weren’t able to see it with all the lights switched on. Explored with Ford Mayhem, KM_Punk and Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  7. History “If you hear water coming, grab a chain and hope for the best†– Punk. After the Second World War, like most other major towns and cities across Britain, Leicester was widely redeveloped; these were partly reconstruction efforts, alongside the much wider movement to improve the country as a whole. As part of the rehousing initiative, many new affordable homes were built and the road systems in and around the city were improved. At the time, Thurmaston, where the culvert is located, was a small village located just outside Leicester. However, as the city has expanded radically, it is now considered to be an urban suburb area. By the late 1950s a new ring road was proposed for the Thurmaston area, to ease traffic congestion. But, during construction it was discovered that the area was at a high risk of being flooded. The area in the photograph displayed above, at the bottom of Melton Road, was often referred to as ‘the Leicester Lagoon’ or a Venetian suburb. Subsequently, a storm relief culvert was created beneath the new road, to take excess water from Melton Brook to the River Soar in Watermead Park. The culvert is based on a simple concrete design, because it had to be positioned in haste to avoid delays in the construction of the road. The entire tunnel runs for about 1.2 miles and had a diameter of approximately 2.2 metres. Despite the countermeasures against flooding back in the 50s, the area has still not fully escape the threat since a water main burst back in December 2012 and consequently a number of houses were affected. Our Version of Events We’d only been in Leicester a few hours and, after having been shown ‘The Golden Mile’, with its endless rows of jewellery shops and takeaways, we decided that it would be safer underground. Apparently there’s as much gold there as Fort Knox (I’m exaggerating, but there is an awful lot of gold lying around). Anyway, it’s an incredibly dodgy looking area with some even dodgier looking folk wandering around. It seems like the sort of place you can climb into a construction site, up a lamppost perhaps, or into an abandoned building and no one bats an eyelid; and we did indeed do all of these things to test this theory. Finding our way to the culvert wasn’t particularly difficult, and we didn’t have far to walk to reach the entrance; which is always a good thing whist rocking the waders. The actual entry was less alluring, however, since we had to navigate our way through a few nettles and brambles to reach the brook itself. Like warriors in waders (and wellies) though, we made it. Thereafter it was easy going, since all we had to do was follow the shallow brook up to the tunnel entrance. The evening that ensued was an entertaining one, as we tried a few different light art techniques we’ve never really bothered with before. Although, it wasn’t until afterwards that we realised how long this culvert actually is; all I can say is that it was an exceptionally long walk back to the car. It was the early hours of the morning when we finally arrived back at the UrbexLodge, ready for a 15 inch pizza and a bevvy or two. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Soul and KM_Punk. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14:
  8. History “Let this be our motto so God will prosper our efforts: Not slothful in business, fervent in spirit, serving God. In prosperity let us not forget Merciesâ€. Edwin Corah and John Harris Cooper. The reputed company, Corah, was founded by Nathaniel Corah inside the Globe Inn on Silver Street in Leicester. It operated from 1815 through to 1999. Originally, Corah produced garments on a knitting frame on his farm, however, the original business model which stemmed from this embryonic occupation sought to purchase already-completed stockings, to then sell them elsewhere at a profit. The factory would become the first in Leicester to be built and designed for steam operation, around a central beam engine; although before that the initial place of operations was opened in 1824 and it remained there on Union Street up until 1845. During this time, Corah’s three sons – John, Thomas and William – were taken into partnership and the company became known as Nathaniel Corah & Sons. By 1855, the company had once again been renamed; this time to Thomas Corah & Sons, and during this time it had over 2000 knitting frames. It was, subsequently, one of the largest hosiery firms in England at the time. The company continued to prosper over the next ten years and by 1865 the premises were once again deemed too small to cater for the scale of manufacture. The company relocated to a larger site later that same year, which was close to both the River Soar and the Great Central Railway; a location which had obvious transportation benefits. This was the factory that would be powered by a large steam powered beam engine. Accordingly, by the early 1870s, the firm was able to expand its product range considerably, and as a result they began to produce a range of football and rugby jerseys, alongside a range of men and women’s garments. Corah was the first company to develop a relationship with Marks & Spencer. One of the main advantages of this association allowed Marks & Spencer to reduce costs by cutting out wholesalers. Working alongside each other also meant that both companies could work together closely to produce products of a higher quality. This relationship was, however, risky for Corah since there was a risk that they would be blacklisted by the Wholesale Textile Association (WTA). In an attempt to avoid this, Corah referred to Marks & Spencer in its accounts only in coded terms. Nonetheless, as predicted, the WTA became aware of the partnership and it removed Corah’s name from the list of approved suppliers. Nonetheless, soon after, many other manufacturers also began to deal with retailers directly, and so the impact of being blacklisted was limited. By the 1960s, Corah employed over 6,000 employees, making it one of the largest manufacturing companies in England at the time. Unfortunately, however, the recessions through both the 1970s and 80s caused the UK hosiery industry to fall into severe financial difficulties. In the aftermath, Corah and other UK companies were challenged by relentless financial complications, changing styles of clothing and foreign competition. Corah finally lost its final link with the founding family in 1989 and later that same year it was sold to an Australian company where it was then broken up after the buyer crashed itself. Sadly, by the late 1900s, the entire Corah enterprise had ceased all of its operations. Today, some parts of the monumental factory are still used by small scale hosiery manufacturers, and a small number of other businesses, however, much of the remaining site is completely derelict and deteriorating rapidly. Our Version of Events “You can’t come to Leicester and not take a look at Corah†said an excited KM_Punk. “What the fuck’s Corah†we replied, with rather clueless expressions on our faces. A little taken aback, Punk was having none of it, and with that we set off, through Leicester’s rush-hour traffic, towards the legendary former textile manufacturer. After surviving yet another journey in ‘The Car’, we wasted no time, and immediately set about trying to find a way inside the mammoth-sized building. That description is no exaggeration either, the place is fucking enormous. Several minutes later though, despite its size, we were all sniffing the stale mustiness; ready to tackle the beast. Sadly, as we’d been warned prior to entering, the place is very trashed indeed; however, if you look hard enough, and risk venturing into the shadowy depths of Corah, little pieces of the past begin to surface. Since Corah has such an extensive and important past (inasmuch as a few days later even an Officer of The Law recommended that we paid the place a little visit), I’m thankful that Punk took the time to bring it to our attention. On the whole, we had a good wander: we grabbed plenty of shots, soaked up some decent views from the rooftop and even managed to test Punk’s climbing capabilities in our attempt to grab a quick peek at the reception area which had, up to that point, been inaccessible. Above all, however, we left feeling much more educated about Leicester’s past. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Soul and KM_Punk. 1: Corah & Sons 2: The Stairwell 3: The Textiles Room 4: Strange Décor 5: The Rooftop 6: The City of Leicester 7: Corah Sign 8: The Cages 9: Old Paperwork 10: The Burnt Office 11: Danger of Overheating 12: Tapes and Records 13: Another Way to the Roof 14: Looking Over Corah & Sons 15: Inside the First Bridge 16: Dirty 17: The Second Bridge 18: The 'Mystical' Looking Door 19: Crucial Office Supplies 20: Official Documentation 21: Back on the Roof 22: WildBoyz Meet the Punk 23: Textiles Machine 24: Ironing Boards and Surfaces 25: Looking Back at Corah 26: Clothes, Tags and Zippers 27: The Main Entrance Doors 28: Main Reception and Receptionist 29: The Vender
  9. Towers Hospital Leicester The Explore What a fucking weekend, visited with Urbexbandoned Got to Leicester early with a certain post office on our minds. After a quick recce of the access, I was perhaps a little over-cautious to be honest and convinced T do go and check out some other locations and return when things looked a bit quieter. Fast forward several hours later and isn't hindsight is a wonderful thing? If we had have gone for the access earlier it would've unfortunately resulted in finding the same sealed up part that we did, only after the assault course that we embarked on. A big "fuck you' to a CCTV camera as we legged it past it, and an eventual climb through a window as a pigeon almost implanted Mrs. Pigeon's birdgina's fluff into my forehead. Rewind.... Walked through a shopping centre full of humans in the hunt for a bit of nightclub action, car parks, more humans, chavs, more cameras with obviously no mother fucker at the screen end. Slipped underneath Leicester for a good hour, sometimes if you're necky it's amazing how you can wonder away from the normal people and through a brown door into service tunnels and fire escape stairwells until you eventually bump into a high viz mongaloid in the underground delivery yard who only responds to any question with the sound "yarp or narp" After being escorted back to the shopping centre I realised that maybe we had just met the missing link between ape and man. A slap up candlelit dinner for two in Maccies later (my treat ) and after walking several miles around checking out a few other possible locations we headed towards Towers.... So I had a pop at this place about 14 months ago and unfortunately we walked into a live workshop area and got busted within about 5 minutes before getting to the main Hospital bit. I was surprised to find that the whole area and the access area i had in mind had been completely flattened. The first part was a walk in thanks to the demo which was well in progress, corridors that i wanted to see last year had sadly been reduced to big piles of bricks. Only the front area and old part of the hospital remains and there may be even less now. The part that i wanted to see was the wards area and unfortunately they had started ripping down suspended ceilings and removing radiators and stuff like that and generally making a mess of the floors which in turn made it difficult to photograph. After a long time walking around the outside of this part we eventually found a broken window which i climbed through then swiftly locked myself in like a bellend as i let the door to the room close behind me Luckily Urbexbandoned was there to climb in to rescue me lol. The History (robbed as always ) Due to population growth and the refusal of the Commissioners in Lunacy to sanction an enlargement of the County Asylum, in 1865 the Leicester Corporation decided to build an asylum for the town’s pauper lunatics. A 30 acre site in Humberstone was purchased for the new Leicester Borough Asylum by the Leicester Borough Council in 1864, for the sum of £8,000. The site was purchased from the executors of the Broadbent estate, having formerly been the home of Benjamin Broadbent (1813 – 1862). Benjamin Broadbent had formed the company of Broadbents Ltd in Leicester in 1840 and by 1861 had amassed sufficient funds to build a house known as Victoria House on a large estate in Humberstone. This was a substantial property and is described in the deeds as a mansion house with stables, coach house, vineries, orchard, houses, conservatories and outbuildings. Anyway, glad to get to see whats left of this place and document a little bit of what it was like before the imminent conversion or whatever they're doing to the place, just wish I wasn't my usual lazy self with the tripod (or lack of the use of it) and got some better pictures but here they are anyway... The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7/8. 9. 10. 11. 12/13. 14. 15. 16/17. 18. 19. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  10. A little History Due to population growth and the refusal of the Commissioners in Lunacy to sanction an enlargement of the County Asylum, in 1865 the Leicester Corporation decided to build an asylum for the town’s pauper lunatics. A 30 acre site in Humberstone was purchased for the new Leicester Borough Asylum by the Leicester Borough Council in 1864, for the sum of £8,000. The site was purchased from the executors of the Broadbent estate, having formerly been the home of Benjamin Broadbent (1813 – 1862). Benjamin Broadbent had formed the company of Broadbents Ltd in Leicester in 1840 and by 1861 had amassed sufficient funds to build a house known as Victoria House on a large estate in Humberstone. This was a substantial property and is described in the deeds as a mansion house with stables, coach house, vineries, orchard, houses, conservatories and outbuildings. The explore Well, I have to say that this was one of the most momentous explore weekends I have ever had! We had quite an eventful lead up to this, with numerous fails in Leicester town earlier that day it was becoming apparent that maybe success wasn't on the radar. We started out trying to find entry in to a nightclub which resulted in us infiltrating the Live service area of a Shopping centre, this was after scnning the entire car park for entry abd getting eyed by a group of chavs in a Corsa. Going through doors we shouldn't have really been going through and ended up with someone that looked like the Chuckle brothers leading us out Then we decided to go and try the post office, this was probably the funniest part. Getting over a huge fucking gate with spikes on the top resulted in me impaling my leg on one of them, ripping my jeans in several places, getting myself stuck between some railings, running across a roof, going down what seemed like the longest ladder in history, through a window to find the place was sealed, tight! a pigeon nearly fly in to his head which was quite funny and I sat and had a fag looking at my broken skin and starting to feel the pain Still, we soldiered on! Eventually found success and got to Towers, parked up, really easy to get in to, spent over an hour just exploring trying to get in to the wards. tried getting through the smallest window in the world, seriously!! Finally found a broken window, inside was a door on a catch, it's allright he said, you stay here and I will go in and see if I can open another window. I watched as he walked through the door and the door shut behind him. I just had to laugh, oh fuck, so I had to get in, undo the door, get back out and get the stuff and then get back in again but we were in. It wasn't disappointing. We didn't see everything that I have seen in previous reports as the demo has taken hold. Still lots to see but I imagine that within a few weeks this will be gone. We were having a nice wander when we were in the front of the building and suddenly I heard HT say secca was outside, all that time we had been out there making noise, walking over bricks, laughing and no one had been there. I stood by the wall and then moved to the window, luckily it had net curtains as he was face to face with me trying the windows. The rest of the explore was fine, didn't see him again at all. The leg got glued up too. He actually thought he could get through this!!! all I could do was laugh! Hope you enjoy!
  11. Visited with Spidermonkey and Zero Urbex back in march. If you have visited this place, you cant deny its stunning. Not much information on this place, especially what you haven't heard. Here's a little taken from other reports The Art Deco Post Office in The Midlands opened in 1935 and was built from coarse grained De Lank Granite. By 1954 this was the first post office in the UK to have a machine that informed package senders the postage to anywhere in the world. The site closed its doors in November 2007 and has sat ever since. It costs the taxpayer £30,000 a year and was sold to the City Council for £1.4 Million in 2008. Some bad photos due to only taking a gopro and my new G7X, which is a great camera when you know how to use it. Hope there are a few different angles than the usual.
  12. Hey all. This place has somehow stayed relatively under the radar for a lot of people. The place is now under demolition sadly, some of the best bits still remain though. A while ago the older building was converted and a lot of the outbuildings demolished. Inside the converted bit is the chapel that has been pretty much untouched since it closed, but I've not managed to get inside yet A tiny bit of history: The Leicester Borough Lunatic Asylum was opened on 2nd September 1869. By 1912 the hospital substituted "Mental Hospital" for "Lunatic Asylum" as "lunatic" was gaining obsolescence in referring to mental health. The present name "Towers Hospital" was acquired in early 1947. It closed its beds in 2000 and total closure was confirmed in 2013. Cheers for looking
  13. Abandoned a couple of years ago, part of a larger complex of buildings D9 Nightclub in Leicester still has working lights and heating. This wasn't a usual Saturday night out for Spider Monkey and I, and was lots of fun! There was even a bit of stock left in the cellar, and beer connected to the bar pumps - but after a couple of years would only be enjoyed by those who are partial to a pint or two of vinegar! 1. Bar in the main club area 2. Main club area 3. Seating and DJ Box 4. Bottles on the bar 5. Club area 6. Beer pump 7. Champagne on display behind the bar 8. This room is illuminated entirely by blue lighting 9. The Blue Bar 10. Blue Room 11. The bar in the blue room 12. Cellar entrance 13. Beer kegs in cellar View higher resolution images on my website - www.bcd-urbex.com Thanks for looking!
  14. Seeing Landie mans report spurred me on to visit this stunning lump of 1930s building situated right in the middle of Leicester on Bishops Street. After getting in with a bit of a faff and a lot of noise we found ourselves in the main hall as the sky brightened, and what a wonderful place this is. It closed in 2008 after being bought by Leicester City Council and the future, subject to planning permission is conversion into yet more awful student accomodation. The developers had hoped to have it ready in September 2014 but it obviously didn't happen. I loved this place, it's truly stunning. Visited with OverArch and jo on a day full of top class derping. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157650463447332/
  15. Wow. Just Wow. This place is incredible; I could have spent a whole day in here and camped over! My God, why do they not build such luscious Post Offices anymore?! This Art Deco Post Office in The Midlands in England opened in 1935 and was built from coarse grained De Lank Granite. By 1954 this was the first post office in the UK to have a machine that informed package senders the postage to anywhere in the world. The site closed its doors in November 2007 and has sat ever since. It costs the taxpayer £30,000 a year and was sold to the City Council for £1.4 Million ($2.12 Million) in 2008 There was talk about demolition to make way for student accommodation. I would be very sad if that happened. Please excuse my awful, noisy photos. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 Sorry about the noise, will return soon!
  16. Wadkins Woodworking The Explore An early start as usual, even earlier for some and after collecting Matt_inked we made our way down to Leicester to scoop up Session9. Then onwards to our primary objective and met with Catbalou at our pre-arranged location. After introductions and a chin-wag we got down to business and made our infil into our desired moochylum. Entry was successful, through jaggedy and nettley jungle terrain (a machete would've been handy). Approx 1 minute 47 seconds later we were being escorted off site by Mr. Hi-Viz WE WILL BE BACK! So, onwards and upwards. We jumped in my car and headed in search for Wadkins. Unfortunately my Sat Nav must've decided to smoke some crack while we were busy getting busted and it sent us on a mystery tour of Leicester, but eventually we found the place and parked up. After a while sussing out the place for entry we finally succeeded, almost minus a nipple or two on my part, and spent a good few hours exploring this not-so-reported-on site. Special thanks to the secca man watching ladies tennis in his office for failing to spot us from about two feet away and to Cat for spotting him first before I walked right past his self-loving chariot. A quieter exit was swiftly made and on to the next place.... History (robbed mostly from Matt Inked cheers) In 1897 John Wadkin founded the company alongside his brother in law Mr W Jarvis. The company was formed following an idea to invent a machine that would be so versatile that it could carry out operations that were originally done by hand. John Wadkin titled this machine, "a pattern milling machine". After a while Mr Wadkin realised his brother in law was a bit of a bell-end and left the company. Mr Jarvis had secretly thought the same after an experience at a recent bukakke/reacharound party and was relieved that he could now recruit his gay lover Mr Wallace Goddard with the intention to expand the business. This paragraph is just a test to see who actually reads the history part. Mr Jarvis became acquainted with a Greek gentleman by the name of Ionades who invented an advanced carburettor. General Motors in the US confirmed that they were interested and invited Mr Jarvis for a meeting to discuss, which led to Mr Jarvis booking a place on the Titanic as a means of travel and the disastrous result that he went down with the ill-fated liner. This left Mr Wallace Goddard with a business in Leicester and no-one to run it. Luckily he had a son that took charge and this continued until 1927 when Mr J Wallace passed away. The 1914-1918 war saw the Government ask Wadkin for help to develop a machine that could turn out wooden propellers for the R.A.F. at a high-speed rate. Throughout the 1930's Wadkin extended their range and entered the high technology market and began making larger, high production woodworking machines such as moulders and double ender machines. (Every household should have a good ‘double ender’ machine haha) The first Wadkin numerically controlled machine was produced in 1956 and the machine proved to be successful and generated much interest from the industry. From the 1990's Wadkin recognised the need to develop back up service support to its machine customers, and developed a nationwide network of engineers in developing its customer response team, which still stands today offering support 365 days a year. Since this, Wadkin have been at the forefront of development and have been named the first British business to be accredited as a learning company by UK Woodchain. In 2010 following the liquidation of Wadkin Limited, the intellectual propert rights were purchased by Nottingham based woodworking machinery distributors and manufacturers A L Dalton Ltd. This move brought together two long established woodworking machinery suppliers who have traded with each other for over 50 years and accumulated over 200 years experience in the industry between them.... Yes, a large amount of text for the history section of this report but worth having a read if you have the time. An example of what once was at the pinnacle of world-leading British engineering... The Pictures... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Nice of them to leave the lights on for us in the last two pics I have pictures of the office area and roof but they have been covered already. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always welcome
  17. Would like to say hello and introduce myself, recently left another well known urbex site and looking for something different! Recently visited st.josephs seminary amongst many other places so will upload soon. Always around and up for a trip so drop me a message. Always happy to exchange locations too 👍 Cheers again from me and the rest of the crew! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  18. This was quite a strange explore. There is some really impressive Grafitti here, And I used to live about 2 minutes away so it was nice coming back here. There's also power too. Visited with Hamtagger, Session9 and Catbalou History Lesson One day there was a swimming pool, people swam, some drowned, there was also a yellow slide. The End I found this too. A group of pensioners bid a fond farewell to swimming pool as the building is set to be closed down. The swimming pool, in Station Road, Wigston, will be demolished and a six-lane replacement with a large fitness suite, built in its place for May, next year. The council is spending £9.2 million to replace the facilities at Wigston and update them. In addition, the money will also pay for a pool to be built at Parklands Leisure Centre, in Oadby, plus a refurbishment. Once this is complete, Oadby pool will be closed down (Possibly a future explore) Picture time Oops... The famous yellow tube! This must have been quite annoying to build The slide/flume This is pretty impressive! And to think Police would arrest him for doing it... Lessabled? That's a new one The amount of Tampax and Sanitary towels in here was unreal This is where the tightest Speedo's were kept The only time I have ever and will ever be in Female changing rooms with a camera Was this where people left their babies when they went for a swim? The deep end Thank you for reading my report. I apologize for the lack of imagination with the pictures but I was feeling sorry for myself because I had food poisoning and was trying to hold vomit down. P.S I lied about the yellow tube being famous, I just wanted it to sound good and not just like a tube.
  19. From the outside (And pretty much inside too) this is the most undesirable place I have explored. The factory is trashed, full of Asbestos, radiation and grafitti. But it was easy to do and it ticks another place off the list. Visited with Hamtagger, Session9 and Catbalou History Lesson In a small town outside of Leicester lies a little known secret, the factory that developed the jet engine. Whetstone was the site of Frank Whittle‘s factory, where jet engines were developed. Babcock Services, ITP Engines Ltd and Converteam now occupy the site, with smaller companies renting space (mainly for storing commercial vehicles). Until 2002 the site still sounded an air raid siren at 8am to wake up workers. The site of the Whittle factory became the English Electric Company (Later GEC) a significant part of several Nuclear power stations were made there in the 1960s and 70s. English Electric was one of the largest Engineering Companies in the Leicester area, employing thousands of workers and training hundreds of apprentices each year. At one point more than 4,000 workers had to be shipped in from Middlesex to help labour shortages and many settled permanently causing a boom in the late 60s. The computer performance measurement called the “Whetstone” was developed by English Electric at the factory and takes its name from the town On with the pictures This was quite off-putting A car wheel, casually sitting in a chair I have no idea where these lead to, just that it was flooded. And I didn't fancy getting wet. Someone clearly needed some new light bulbs This must have taken a while to do Just a stapler This worker had a softcore porn cupboard door. Horny bastard In Case Of Fire "Shove Fire Hose In Window" I'm guessing this guy was pretty "Norty" in School, he seemed to have failed his English tests. Not the trongest of floors, I could feel it dipping beneath my feet. A crane from the 80's Some boring stairs with no bannister Thanks for taking time to read my report. This factory was pretty boring, every room looked the same but the history behind it is interesting.
  20. This place was mint when I first saw it on the forum, and I just had to visit, as it is a rare type of site. I knew it had been trashed since….. but not on this scale! I’m not a fan of graffiti; especially mindless vandalism, but I did take the time to look at some of it in there, and I have to say there was some quite good stuff in there. It was an interesting explore, and glad to have got it done before its demolition. Many thanks to Leicester Urban XP for showing me round. Thanks to RichPDG for originally posting, and Ive quoted what little is know about this place. Built 1954-1957, and closed March 2014. The existing Wigston Swimming Pool will be demolished and in its place will be built a new facility featuring a 6 lane 25m competition pool with timing equipment and starting blocks, and a 60 station gym featuring the latest fitness equipment, this is due for completion in Spring 2015. thanks for looking
  21. UK Corah, Leicester, Apr14

    Corah was my ‘I’ve never seen Star Wars’ Leicester site. It was always on the back burner on the things to do list, and a something else often came up. Its about time I did this, and a good opportunity arose to explore, with Lost Explorer, King Mongoose, and his next in line. It’s a huge site, and was described to me as ‘the gift that keeps on giving’, and I must admit no two reports on this place are the same. Its seen better days, but still an enjoyable afternoon. On the roof, bumped into fellow explorer, Zombie; nice to meet you mate. Got a nice group shot around the roof sign. N. Corah and Sons was a manufacturer of hosiery and textiles founded somewhere in the region of 1825, located in Leicester in the United Kingdom. At one time it was the largest knitwear producer in Europe, and its products had a major influence on the development and prosperity of the Marks and Spencerchain of retail stores. The company was founded by Nathaniel Corah at the Globe Inn, Silver Street, in Leicester – a building which still survives, and which at that time was closely associated with the city's stockinger. Corah's business model was to buy completed stockings in Leicester, and to sell them elsewhere at a profit. The firm was the first company to develop a relationship with Mark’s and Spencer, a well-known British retailer. The latter's St Michaels brand, which it used from 1928 until 2000, was inspired by Corah's use of "St Margaret" as a label for its clothing Corah maintained a design room until at least the 1960s, which enabled it to present customers such as Marks & Spencer with designs for finished products such as dresses. It even sent clothes to Marks & Spencer already arranged by size so that they could go straight into the store. In the 1970s, the company's trade with Marks & Spencer was worth £20 million per annum – and Corah celebrated the "golden anniversary" of the relationship in 1976. However, the downfall of the textiles trade had started in the 1960’s with higher demand in fashion and more expensive materials in a tighter, more low cost market. By the 1980’s and 1990’s Corah was fastly declining. The factory doors were finally closed for the last time during the late 1990’s. And yes...... off course I've seen Star Wars Sooo, Starting with a nice roof shot: what a mess think this was the karatee room thanks for looking
  22. Founded in 1897, this company manufactured Wood working machinery until it's liquidation in 2010. I believe the company name still exists in some sort of servicing capacity. A pretty cool place, although the factory floor is empty there is still a few bit's & pieces dotted about. A quick solo visit which made a good to start the 2014 season with a trouble free explore.
  23. So onto our next site, the Leicester Location A was a fail, so onto the next one we went too, the relatively undamaged tool workshop. John Wadkin founded Wadkins alongside his brother in law Mr W Jarvis in 1897. The company was formed after an idea to invent a machine that would be so versatile that it could carry out operations that were originally done by hand. John Wadkin decided to name this machine, "a pattern milling machine" The partnership was not successful and John eventually left the company. Mr Wallace Goddard then partnered up with Mr W Jarvis, with the intention to expand the business. Mr Jarvis was soon introduced to a Greek gentleman by the name of Ionades who invented an advanced carburettor. U.S. Based General Motors confirmed that they were interested and invited Mr Jarvis for a meeting to discuss his invention. Mr Jarvis booked a place on the Titanic as a means of travel and unfortunately passed away in the 1912 incident. Mr Wallace Goddard was now left with a business in Leicester and no-one to operate it. Fortunately, his son that took charge and this continued until 1927 when Mr J Wallace passed away. World War I saw the Government ask Wadkin for assistance in developing a machine that could produce wooden propellers for the R.A.F. at high-speed. After the war the demand for woodworking machinery was at a tremendous upsurge. In the 1920's the development of the “Integral Electric Drive†spurred the production of more efficient types of woodworking machines. Wadkin soon pioneered high production machines that operated at much faster speeds than before and the woodwork was of higher quality. Throughout the 1930's Wadkin’s range extended and entered the high technology market and began building larger, high production woodworking machines such as moulders and double ender machines. The first numerically controlled machine made by Wadkin was released in 1956 and the machine proved to be successful and generated much interest from the industry. By the 1990's; Wadkin saw the need to develop back up service support to its customers units, and developed a nationwide network of engineers in developing its customer response team, which still stands today offering support 365 days a year. Wadkin have been leaders in development and have been named the first British business to be accredited as a learning company by UK Woodchain. By 2010; Wadkin Limited were liquidated and the intellectual property rights were purchased by Nottingham based woodworking machinery distributors and manufacturers A L Dalton Ltd. This move brought together two long established woodworking machinery suppliers who have traded with each other for over 50 years and accumulated over 200 years experience in the industry between them. Light was not on our side, so this was a rather rushed explore which seems to have produced an unintended film effect on most of my shots. More At: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157639149865056/with/11625557976/
  24. The other part of my end of year jaunt with Landie and a non member. After a fail at another site close by we got lucky and received word from MD that this place was doable so we hot footed it here against the failing afternoon light - the lack of light eventually winning out so we called it a day. History stolen from MD's 2011 report. This place is seriously weird, it's obviously derped yet in a lot of the site the electricity, water, heating and lighting all still works, this includes the roller shutters inside parts of the factory floor as well! As the failing light won out we missed a few bits so a revisit is needed in the new year. More photos here http://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157639121390116/ That rounds up 2013 for me folks, it's been a good year!
  25. Visited with a fellow moocher back in August and only had a couple of hours before losing the light so only covered a small part of this huge site. Didn't manage to get on the roof (I wanted to get some city sunset shots) as we stumbled across the two or three Eastern European squatters who have made this place home. They were chatting on the roof in the late afternoon sun and we didn't fancy disturbing them as there have been reports of them not being a friendly bunch so we moved on to another part of the site. It's pretty wrecked now and large sections have been demolished. There are parts of the site that are still live with several small knitwear businesses, a recording studio, function rooms and an indoor skate park all making use of what's left. I have fond memories of this place as I remember going there as a child with my mum to buy new socks and underwear from the factory shop. Even then I remember being in awe of the size of the buildings History N. Corah and Sons was a manufacturer of hosiery and textiles, located in Leicester. At one time it was the largest knitwear producer in Europe, and its products had a major influence on the development and prosperity of the Marks & Spencer. The company was founded by Nathaniel Corah. Corah's business model was to buy completed stockings in Leicester, and to sell them elsewhere at a profit. The business soon grew, and its premises on Union Street in Leicester were purchased in 1824. The company remained at these premises until 1845. In 1830, Corah's three sons – John, Thomas and William – were taken into partnership. The name of the firm became Nathaniel Corah & Sons. By 1865, its premises had become too small, and so the company decided to relocate to a location close to the River Soar and the Great Central Railway.The initial plans devised a scheme for the construction of premises on an immense scale: the main warehouses were 160 feet long and 50 feet wide. The rear was an even larger building, the factory, the dimensions of which were 294 by 80 feet. The works were driven by a large steam powered beam engine, which was started for the first time on 13 July 1865 and a 140-foot chimney was attached to the factory. Sadly the majority of this part has now been demolished. The last decades of the 20th Century in Leicester witnessed the continuing decline of the city's once great hosiery and textile industries and the effect of foreign imports and increased competition saw the end of the once great Nathaniel Corah & Sons in the late 1990's. There's loads of info out there on the interweb but some of the best can be found here and here On with the photos... Entrance or Exit ? Peely Paint Porn In April 2012 there was a fire in the main office block which gutted one section, Thankfully the huge fire doors were closed and stopped the fire from spreading throughout the rest of the building. A 17 year old was arrested in connection with the fire. Reception Bridges Factory The Loo ! Exterior The small addition on the roof was used during the 2nd WW by the Fire Watchers. The frames for the bunk beds are still in there. More of the same can be found here
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