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Found 5 results

  1. The Visit Another evening explore with redhunter I couldn't believe that this place would be accessible with it being so public on the ground floor but redhunter found a way The actual building has been completely stripped ready for demolition but the roof and that strange greenhouse area are incredible! Spent a good while on the roof watching the sun go down! The History Birmingham Central Library was the main public library in Birmingham, England from 1974 until 2013. For a time the largest non-national library in Europe, it closed on 29 June 2013 and was replaced with the Library of Birmingham. The existing building was due to be demolished early in Summer 2015 after 41 years, as part of the redevelopment of Paradise Circus by Argent Group. Designed by architect, John Madin in the brutalist style, the library was part of an ambitious development project by Birmingham City Council to create a civic centre on its new Inner Ring Road system; however due to economic reasons significant parts of the masterplan were not completed and quality was reduced on materials as an economic measure. Two previous libraries occupied the adjacent site before Madin’s library opened in 1974. The previous library was opened in 1883 and was designed by John Henry Chamberlain featuring a tall clerestoried reading room, this was demolished in 1974 after the new library had opened Despite the original vision not being fully implemented the library has gained architectural praise as an icon of British Brutalism with its stark use of concrete, bold geometry, inverted ziggurat sculptural form and monumental scale. Its style was seen at the time as a symbol of social progressivism. Based on this, English Heritage applied and failed twice for the building to gain listed status. However, due to strong opposition from Birmingham City Council the building gained immunity from listing until 2016. In 2010–11 Central Library was the second most visited library in the country with 1,197,350 visitors.
  2. The Philanthropist's Library Visited with: Alex Visit date: August 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. History The construction of the library was funded by a well known businessman and opened in June 1905 and remained in use up until 2006 when the building was closed due to safety concerns. The good news is that a charity who would like to renovate the building and give it a new lease of life have just received a grant. Renovation work has begun and the plan is to have work complete within the next couple of years. Final thoughts Even though a lot of the original features inside the building have been removed due to either damage or restoration purposes the bits that still remain give you a feel of how this place would have looked. The green tiles shining on the lower parts of the wall, the stunning woodwork nicely polished and the beautiful stonework running around the edge of the ceiling all lit up by the natural light streaming in through the skylights and dome. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  3. Explored with FatPanda, Raz & Jord Bit of History; Birmingham Central Library was the main public library in Birmingham, England from 1974 until 2013. For a time the largest non-national library in Europe, it closed on 29 June 2013 and was replaced with the Library of Birmingham. The existing building was due to be demolished early in Summer 2015 after 41 years, as part of the redevelopment of Paradise Circus by Argent Group. Designed by architect, John Madin in the brutalist style, the library was part of an ambitious development project by Birmingham City Council to create a civic centre on its new Inner Ring Road system; however due to economic reasons significant parts of the masterplan were not completed and quality was reduced on materials as an economic measure. Two previous libraries occupied the adjacent site before Madin’s library opened in 1974. The previous library was opened in 1883 and was designed by John Henry Chamberlain featuring a tall clerestoried reading room, this was demolished in 1974 after the new library had opened. Despite the original vision not being fully implemented the library has gained architectural praise as an icon of British Brutalism with its stark use of concrete, bold geometry, inverted ziggurat sculptural form and monumental scale. Its style was seen at the time as a symbol of social progressivism. Based on this, English Heritage applied and failed twice for the building to gain listed status. However, due to strong opposition from Birmingham City Council the building gained immunity from listing until 2016. In 2010–11 Central Library was the second most visited library in the country with 1,197,350 visitors. The Explore First stop of the day, and things didnt look promising as we walked around the edges of this derpy monster and we were very surpised that we actually got a preview in the form of a public walk way through the middde of the courtyard Noting weaknesses in the defence as we went, one thing lead to another and soon we were taking a leisurely stroll through the workers equipment room. No need for torches in this one, in the areas where the walls aren't glass, the demolition company have kindly assisted with lamps to guide the way... How thoughtful of them Structually it is a great building, in terms of the little nick nacks inside its a shell, a building site. However here are a few snaps of our time here; Thanks for looking
  4. (it will be my first ... so lets make it with quality) The archive and forgotten library It was a cold winter day. Because of the short day I decided to meet with my friends and explore some local industrial zone. We were vising it since few weeks already. Building after building. Because the place was guarded (it still is) we were not in the hurry. Sometimes entering different buildings took us some time because the entrance was not that obvious. Once in we had a lot of time to document what we will find. Little that we know what awaited us that day particular day. In some way we were not expecting anything interesting. We already knew that most of the buildings are just pure industrial/production halls. That day we decided to enter one inconspicuous three floored building. Since it was quite close to the guards office we didn’t wanted to risk. With all caution we tried to find some entrance to that building. Nothing. With all the desperation we tried the windows. At some point one window at the height of 2 meters gave in (we didn’t brake it, it just opened). We entered the building. Usually when you are inside you are safe from the guards but since we didn’t know what expect we were still careful. First we found a view that was just expected. Raw, industrial. A corridor that opened to a small hall and some workshops. Since the building was three floored we wanted to see what is upstairs. We found a staircase and started to climb the stairs. From old stained by dust windows we could see guards patrolling the area. Soo lucky we were inside. After we reached the top floor we noticed that the place looks like there was no one since a long time. Dust, no foot prints, a grating door closed by a rusty padlock. Since it was the top floor we could see that the water was leaking through the ceiling. Now we noticed that not just the padlock is rusty but the grating itself also. With just a bit of force it gave in … giving us just enough space to enter. Another corridor and then … room after room we noticed where we are. First what I have noticed was a reading room. Desks and chairs not moved since long time. No footprints. Just next to it a library. Books wet with water dripping through the ceiling. I could notice that someone tried to save those books by covering the bookshelves with some kind of foil. The efforts went in vein. Books covered with fungi, wet, decaying. Moving on to another rooms we noticed that its not just the library and the reading room here. First empty rooms filled with decaying documents Someone tried to stock them up, maybe to move them away/save them. In the end they just started to rot. Moving on we discovered what were those documents and where did they came from. The library and reading room were attached to project rooms. Once fantastic now … At the end of the corridor we found an archive. A place where all those documents were stored in the most proper way. There were two type of archive rooms. One old archive with old wooden furniture. Containing different plans and graphs, projects of the things produced in the industrial zone. There was also more modern part of the archive. This time more steel/aluminum In the end we were vising this single location for almost 2 months. Every Sunday or Saturday checking all the details, gathering photographic material. Unfortunately such places can’t be a secret forever. Since the moment other local explorers found it location it started to decay even faster. More (best photos selected) from this location can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/126529380@N08/sets/72157650551638208/with/16993743615/ … and if you want you can also check my fb … https://www.facebook.com/HDReverywhere
  5. Parndon Hall is a LIVE non public site and currently houses the Princess Alexandra Hospital medical library for student medical staff, doctors and consultants. _______________________________________________ In the North West corner of the Princess Alexandra Hospital site in Harlow, amongst tall magnificent trees, stands Parndon Hall, an Itailianate redbrick mansion with Portland stone dressings Parndon Hall was built in 1867 for Loftus Wigram Arkwright (Great Grandson of Sir Richard Arkwright, who invented the first powered mechinism for spinning cotton) The Arkwrights had been major land owners in Harlow since the early 1800's In 1864 Loftus Arkwright inherited the estate of Parndon from his father, the Rev Joseph Arkwright and commisioned the diocesan arcitect Joseph Clark to design Parndon Hall, the building was finished in 1867 and Loftus moved in with his 29 year old wife Elizabeth (nee Elizabeth Reynolds, a renowned and talented horsewoman and artist) Parndon Hall is now a Grade II listed building, the main feature of the house is the massive oak staircase featuring turned balusters and finaled newels. The ceilings, walls and doors have brightly coloured decorative scenes painted by Elizabeth Arkwright who in a sense leaves a much larger impression of the house that her husband. The accomplished paintings by Elizabeth imply that she had received good artistic training and used the latest oil paints in vivid colours Elizabeth was an large but energetic woman who would enjoy riding out with the hunt and return to Parndon all to be hauled up on scaffolding to continue her painting. Many of her larger art works have recently come to auction internationally. Loftus also loved the outdoor life and became Master of the Hunt and a JP, after a riding accident in Epping Forest in 1868 left him paralysed he continued to follow the hunt in a phaeton. By 1879 he employed 40 gamekeepers alone but his fortunes soon ended and rents on his land which were tied to the price of grain fell after poor harvests and cheap imports and by 1881 he had 250 acres of farmland worked by only 12 men and 3 boys Loftus Arkwright died in 1889 and Elizabeth died a year later aged 57 and the estate was inherited by their only son Loftus Joseph, but by this time the family fortune was dwindling and Loftus Jnr moved into the farmhouse and economised by renting out Parndon Hall and Mark Hall (the second Arkwright residence) Then in 1894 he married Julia Caldwell and they had 3 sons (another Loftus, John and Godfrey) they then moved back into the family home at Parndon Hall. By 1903 Loftus Jnr was truly back on his feet and brought the estates and manor of Netteswell in Harlow and formed Mark Hall Estates Co. with 5,000 acres. But his happiness was not to last and in 1912 Julia divorced him, testifying in court that her husband had affairs with the servants and was physically violent towards her. After Julia left him taking his sons, Loftus became a recluse and eccentric. His housekeeper would wheel his meals from the kitchen in a pram and the disrepair of the house was such that rainwater had to be caught in tin bath. Loftus died in 1950 but not before two of his sons had met with tragedy, John had been a commander in the Royal Navy and was killed in action when his ship the HMS Avenger was destroyed by a German U-Boat in 1942 and Loftus (Jnr Jnr) had owned a garage in Kensal Rd, London, but sometime before his mothers Julia's death in 1933 he disappeared. He was lat heard of driving recklessly and over the speed limit late at night in London and no more has ever been heard of him. This left his surviving son Godfrey Arkwright to inherit Parndon Hall The paintings were whitewashed over sometime in the 1890's the reason is not clear, possibly because Julia Arkwright disapproved of the nude figures or possibly that renting out the house, Loftus needed to cover up the nudes. Whatever the reason the painting were not rediscovered until after the Second World War, some paintings in the entrance hall are still hidden behind the white paint After the Second World War, the Harlow New Town Corporation was formed in 1947 to house the London overspill. It started purchasing land around the old villages of (Old) Harlow, Latton, Great Parndon and Netteswell. The Corporation compulsory purchased Parndon Hall and all of its land. Godfrey was now unable to enjoy his inheritance and reluctantly moved out of his family home in September 1952 only to die a year later. In 1954 Parndon Hall became and independent boarding school for deprived boys and girls and was run by a Mrs Katherine "Kitty Clare JP and in 1970 Princess Alexandra Hospital brought the freehold Planning permission has been granted for the conversion of Parndon Hall into 9 apartments
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