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Found 29 results

  1. History Once part of Lancashire, Worsley is a small town in Greater Manchester, England. It is first mentioned in the Great Rolls of the Pipe (a collection of financial records maintained by the English Exchequer) in 1195, when it was known as Werkesleia, meaning, in the language of the Saxons, ‘the cleared place which was cultivated or settled’. Prior to the 18th century, Worsley comprised a small farm-based village and a manor created by William I; however, after the completion of the Bridgewater Canal in 1761, the village began to expand as cotton manufacturers, iron and brick works and coal mining companies were established in the area. Further expansion of the town came following the First and Second World Wars, as large residential estates were introduced, to house the increasing number of workers of nearby factories and evacuees from the south of England. A small section of Worsley Brook was culverted during the Industrial Revolution, because a canal had to be constructed above to provide a more efficient means of transporting coal from Worsley to Salford. The first part of the culvert would have been built sometime in the late 1750s. After the completion of the canal it was considered a major engineering achievement because it was accomplished in a timely fashion, built over the top of obstacles such as Worsley Brook and the River Irwell, and even allowed boats to travel underground into the coal mines themselves. By 1887, however, the mines in the area ceased production. Most of the works and several large warehouses were demolished during the early 1900s and the area was transformed so that new developments could be positioned on the land. As part of this redevelopment a larger 400 metre section of Worsley Brook was culverted, to allow for building over the top. Today, Worsley Culvert is undergoing major restoration work to address various structural problems. It was reported that the deteriorating state of the brickwork posed risks to 260 local properties because there was a risk of it collapsing and causing subsequent flooding. The plans to stabilise the structure involve lining it with thirty-six four-tonne concrete sections. According to the Environment Agency, a number of pumps have been installed to help drain and divert the brook while the work takes place. Our Version of Events After a rough night sleeping beneath a tarp, we were pretty keen to get moving and do some exploring. To avoid sleeping in two cramped cars (there were eight of us after all), which were each filled with a lot of Tesco sandwich packaging, pigeon shit, a little bit of asbestos and enough gear to get us through a nuclear war, four of us had decided to kip outside beneath the stars. We’d found a nice little spot in some sort of country park by a small duck pond, and it was only really as we were setting up that we started to noticed that the floor was turning white with frost. Still, we decided to ignore it, and cracked on with setting up our campsite for the evening. We figured that we’d just each wear three or four jackets and hoodies and light a few candles for warmth. By the morning, though, none of us could feel our arms and legs anymore. The last bit of warmth in our bodies was centred around the torso area. Getting up was the worst bit, as we left behind the little warmth there was inside our sleeping bags. Putting the boots back on felt like stepping into blocks of ice. The morning didn’t get any better as we noticed that there was a layer of ice covering the tarp, and that the pond behind us had completely frozen over. What is more, we’d left a large half-eaten cake outside, thinking it would be perfectly fine throughout the night for us to enjoy at breakfast, but it was gone! All that remained were several fox footprints (or so we guessed) in the frost. It took a wee while to thaw out a bit before we could pack everything up, so our start to the day was a little delayed. Nevertheless, once we were back inside the cars, with the heaters running at full blast, we were ready for some more exploring. First on the list was an old culvert… You can tell this was a well-planned winter trip. Having said that, there was some intelligent thinking behind this decision to don the waders in December. Prior to embarking on our trip to Liverpool, we’d stumbled across a few old reports on a fantastic looking culvert known as ‘Old Worsley’. Judging by the photographs we found, it was short but filled with all sorts of old brick and stonework. The problem, though, was that we’d read about redevelopment work being scheduled between 2016 and 2017. So, since we were passing through Manchester on our way to Liverpool, we figured it would be nice to take a quick look. We hoped, with a little bit of luck on our side, that the work crew might not have ruined it too much just yet. We arrived at the entrance of the culvert, which is situated at the side of a nice residential estate, just as everyone else seemed to be waking up. What this means is that we looked like a right bunch of space cadets as we wadered up in middle of the street. One guy who was walking his small sausage dog, which made him look ever so slightly like a camp paedophile, stared at us with an angered expression on his face. He even doubled back on himself to walk past us another couple of times, and the entire time he kept his beady little eyes on us. Thankfully, it didn’t take long to walk up to the brook, so we were soon out of sight. You know what they say, out of sight out of mind. Inside, we were instantly a bit disappointed because the redevelopment work seemed to be in full swing. The first section is now almost completely reinforced with concrete. The next part, where there is an arched entranceway and what should have been a rugged boxed off section inside, didn’t look too good either; now, a concrete shell has been erected inside it. The work looked very recent too, since some of the cement was still a bit damp, which was unfortunate indeed. Things looked a lot more promising, however, once we reached the end of this fresh Soviet-inspired culvert (someone ought to stamp a little hammer and sickle in the cement as the company logo really). We had reached a brick chamber with an arched brick tunnel leading off to the right. The first steps into the chamber were tentative. The water looked deep and cold. We weren’t wrong. As we waded a few steps forwards towards the arched tunnel, the water instantly became thigh deep (and by that we mean upper thigh). But, ignoring the ball tingling chill, we carried on; the tunnel ahead was interesting and, as far as we could see, there was much more to see further ahead. It was at this point that Ford Mayhem started to find the explore a lot less entertaining mind, as he had discovered a hole in his waders. The main thought whirling around his head at the time was something along the lines of “for fucks sake, why is it getting deeper?! Man, I’m going to have to hold my torch and snap shut the hole on my waders with my hand. Here goes… Fuck, fuck! It’s cold! Jesus, my hand is cold”. Things got even more tricky towards the middle part of the arched tunnel too, as it dips a little bit, so we were forced to lean further into the water. At this point, it was safe to say that most of us were within inches of breaching point as the water was chest deep. For poor Mayhem, the situation was even worse because the key thought swirling around his head now was, “Wait. Why am I getting wet down my right leg? I thought I was holding it shut?... Oh shit. I have a hole on the rear side as well. FUCK!”. Inside the next section the ceiling was considerably higher, so we could stand up straight again. We were still waist deep in the water though, and by this point our legs were starting to go a little numb. It was so cold in there that there was an icy mist hovering over the water. It was a bit like walking into a steamy sauna, but without the steam and heat. At least we didn’t have to worry about our balls being cold anymore mind, since they’d moved right up into our stomachs to hibernate. For reasons unknown even to ourselves, we continued on. Once again the water level started to get deeper and deeper. It was at this point, two of the Boyz bailed after having stopped for several minutes to discuss how much of a shit time they were having. They had almost reached the breaching point of their waders and couldn’t continue forward any longer as it was still getting deeper. Mayhem was left standing in waist deep water the whole time, trying to pinch shut two holes while holding his torch. What was running through his mind at this point was a slightly desperate “why won’t the others hurry the fuck along? I’m freezing my tits off here!” After a bit more debating, the rest of us made the decision to carry on and see how far we could get. Two metres later, though, and almost all of the other Boyz had decided to bail. The water was millimetres away from pouring inside the waders at this stage. So, now, there were only two happy-ish WildBoyz willing to carry on, all for the sake of producing a swish new report at the end of it. Soul led the way, followed by Mayhem. For some reason, Soul’s waders seemed to go right up to his nipples and beyond. He might as well have been wearing a dry suit, so he was pretty comfortable throughout this entire endeavour. As for Mayhem, he battled on, trying to pinch his waders with one hand while carrying a torch and now a tripod and camera in the other. The rest of the group had handed it to him as they weren’t going any further. Somehow, he was doing well for a few more metres or so, until, all of a sudden, another icy trickle could be felt down the inside of his right leg. The water was so cold he’d lost all feeling in his fingers, and they were no longer capable of gripping anymore. The bitter water, which might as well have been a murky flavoured Slush Puppy, quickly started to fill up his waders. A sequence of the foulest words known to mankind quickly filled the still silence of the tunnel, followed by the cruel laughter of five others. Cold and completely wet, Mayhem decided that he might as well continue and finish off the explore. Motivated by the knowledge that he had a dry flannel back in the car, he cracked on like a proper legend. Meanwhile, everyone else headed straight for the Barton Arms, a pub that’s not too far from the entrance of ‘Old Worsley’, for a quick shandy. By the time Soul and Mayhem got to the pub, looking a lot like two washed up submariners, the rest of the Boyz had knocked back a good few drinks and a few steak and ale pies. It has to be said that sitting in the pub, close to a roaring fire, after being permanently cold for the past 12 hours or so felt pretty damn amazing. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, Rizla Rider, Box and Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  2. 9 Ford Lane (Viewpoint) Salford https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B8JXjvg-zGxqQ292a2NXQjFsYXM?usp=sharing
  3. Hi all this is a cool little place. Its the barton undercroft in manchester. I couldent wait to give it an awesome title name cause well its an abaondoned horror walk also now lol. Very cool. Anyway on with some history. History The arcade was listed as a Grade II* listed building on the 25 January 1972. The listing includes the "block of shops (Barton's Building) and offices enclosing the arcades." It was constructed by Corbett, Raby and Sawyer in 1871.[2] Hartwell describes the Barton's Building facade as "utterly ignorant.. the ground floor pilasters must be seen to be believed."[3] The arcade, however, is "a gorgeous glass and iron shopping arcade with glass domes..., the best example of this type of cast-iron and glass arcade anywhere in the country."[3] The entrance to the arcade on St Ann's Square incorporates a large, cast iron and glass wall. The two entrances on Deansgate are hidden behind the Barton Building. The building is of "four storeys with an attic, a long nine-bay facade to Deansgate, divided in half horizontally by a balustraded balcony".[2] The structure is composed of cast iron and glass. The iron work was supplied by the Macfarlane Saracen Glass Factory in Glasgow.[3] The building was one of the first to be built on the newly widened Deansgate.[4] The arcade was restored in the 1980s. The original shop fronts and decorative floor no longer exist Thats from wiki but some other bits i found It was used as some sort of ghost tour by a company called flecky bennet. And they talk about anne frank etc. It was used has a bunker in the blitz etc. When they was told they couldent do it anymore seems they left a lot of stuff. very intresting if a little fooked up and creepy has shit when you turn a corner and 6 mannequins stare back. Anyway was bloody great fun And visited with @stranton and a big thanks to @bolts also. Things went fairly well until we opened a door and out came the alarms and secca. Talk about move fast lol. we got out ok but fook wish i could have mooched a bit more. Got a couple of pics from roof also. Overall just a fun night. Just dont mension the fact we went into a carpark found an open door went for a we mooch has you do only to find a fooking bank vault and cctv every where jeesus we ran like the wind lol. Shame sadly no pics for obvious reasons ie bloody cam right at us. Outside on the side of the building in big fooking letters it says BANK lol. Yes folks a maybe live bank by accident lol. Awesome. Never stuck around to find out. And good job cause a guy was seeling us in and he said his stuff about police and we where robbers etc etc lol. And off we went. Anyways some pics for you. Enjoy all thanks for reading. Pics.. Give me an hand lol... Lovely old stairs Roof shots Thanks to everyone who looked i hope you all like it. On to the next laters all.
  4. Mr Wevs had decided to visit the fine city of Manchester to see what all the fuss was about so we went out and hit 11 spots over the course of a couple of days in Manchester, Sheffield, and Derpy there are a few drains in Manc which really should be seen, HFLB is one of them The outfall is a tidy brick arch which leads onto the River Medlock Once inside it's a comfortable size to walk down and the brick is pretty nice The sewer which overflows into HFLB is quite small but the penstock is decent and it's not too dirty (compared to SSSI) Better late than never
  5. Access into the arches is always a bit sketchy and this time was no different, once inside there's no real chance of being disturbed (other than from pigeons.) The arches as a location is pretty big but 99% of the population of Manchester are unaware of what lies just below their feet. .
  6. The Explore So this was a good few months back now and after seeing the newspaper articles of one side of the building totally collapsing I'm glad I got in to see it but does open your eyes to how dangerous these buildings can be without us knowing.. The first few floors have you thinking its just another empty building but then you walk into the old office rooms!!!!! The History The Excelsior Printing and Bookbinding Works was originally opened on the Monday 4th July 1870 and the owner at the time was Mr John Heywood. At the time when it was opened this place could take on upto 750 employees and was one of the largest of it kind. Clare Tooling Systems occupied the building around the late 80's early 90's. Here are a few pics from the news articles of what it looked like after the collapse
  7. This was a Sunday early morning visit with a non member and was a really nice place to go round. Sadly now part of the main bit has collapsed back in July - http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/castlefield-building-collapse-hulme-hall-9738136 History - The Excelsior Printing and Bookbinding Works was originally opened on the Monday 4th July 1870 and the owner at the time was Mr John Heywood. At the time when it was opened this place could take on upto 750 employees and was one of the largest of it kind. Clare Tooling Systems occupied the building around the late 80's early 90's.
  8. Visited with @stranton And @ACID- REFLUX. Thx to them both for the great time had here. Anyways on with the report and pics History Inhospitable Inhospitable is a 700yd culvert which carries the moss brook beneath Collyhurst, the infall consists of a 15ft brick arch this changes too a10ft brick arch which continues towards the outfall which consists of a 7ft brick pipe built 8ft up in a retaining wall. Halfway through the culvert theres an overflow chamber with a manual operated penstock, once the flow gets too strong the penstock drops blocking the culvert this causes the brook too divert along the works something which seldon occurs. the Works the Works is a 700yd overflow which passes alongside and below Inhospitable, consists of a 10ft red and black brick pipe. This exits the overflow chamber by droping down 2 sets of steps the latter been steep, once at the bottom you are at least 70ft below the surface. Both the moss brook and the Works discharge too the Irk, (one of Manchesters 2 secondary waterways). Hope you all enjoy thx for looking..
  9. http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/man-found-dead-cambridge-street-9661663 Sad to read, hope it wasn't anyone from the community. Please, stay safe out there
  10. Sidedraft is one of 7 culverts along the Gore brook,well so it seems from checking a few reports.There is an overflow from the sewer and a lovely chamber to stand on to look down on the flow of teh poops.. Have to say the water in parts wast fast moving which made the walk down easy enough but a fucker on the ankles with the stones underfoot,then coming back was a right bugger struggling along the flow.All in all i enjoyed this one,thanks again to Paul for the company and lols in this one! Pictures .. Going in after a lovely slide down the mangled metal covering the entrance It amazes me just how much shit people throw away and into water that ends up in these places Fisheye should have been deployed but it was a case of CBA so it is what it is! Many spider egg sacks and much fly in this place which i was informed by paul the flies love headtorches so i got a lot in what's left of my teeth Cant remember what order if any the rest of these are in i seem to have spent a lot of time in various drains so it has all blurred in my memory The reason this has it's name is this pipe going up the side as far as i know. Pauls big boy torch lighting the rear which i kindly stole the light from cos im a laxy twunt like that at times last few then im done.. The way out ..yet another drain done and then on to the next.. Obligatory drain pose Cos it's what all the cool kids do
  11. This was the 2nd explore on my last day up sunny North with Paul.where i knew i was going to need something a little heavier than my Velbon tripod which fitted nicely inside my rucksack,so entry to a few of the places visited was ballache with tut tripod on the outside of my bag which pissed me off no end with acces to places like this.. Anyway now you know that fascinating fact i shall continue. Hulme Flumes Little Brother it seems is a sewer overflow which outfalls into the River Medlock.Really enjoyed this one as small a place as it is,nice walk along the river to grab the standard shots in Umist on the way back As you step up from the river of rubbish you are greeted by this .. So a bit of this with Big torch seemed appropriate.. Very unprofessional Umbex of me as i couldnt be arsed to cliamber up and light down from the section just right,paul did but that's because he is a pro A shot looking down from the walk way and one from in the stink looking at that penstock which i had to climb back in several times to get to my satisfaction Got up close and personal to teh Poopz so i could have a proper look down here,paul wasn't sure but seemed to think this slope leads down to a syphon so any one who knows otherwise please feel free to chip in! Fisheye overkill to get it all in! and back out and heading towards Umist Coned off And off we trundled..thanks for looking at yet another report Does he look a happy chap
  12. I am not going to pretend i am some sort of expert on the working of such places and the facts of what it is exactly but what i do know is walking up the pipe i was met by about an inch of fat which disguised the fact there was shit floating around with the wet wipes and fanny plasters under foot! Seems they have spray crete'd parts since Pauls last visit and it looks shit to be honest.Getting down and across to the pipe was fun shall we say but once inside i set to work faffing about with lighting and employed paul to be my Lighting Bitch for a few shots,did walk up the river to the brick egg as to be honest i had done enough endless walking to last a life time. Big thanks to paul for assisting me get through a decent amount that was on my list and doable during the daylight hours we where about.. Totally get why there are so many people into these drains/sewers and the such like they are pretty amazing and the brick work and skill that was used is something else pics.. Quick look back from the way in.. Apparently the toy/doll mounted in the middle of this junction is a drain fairy..learn something new every day i decided being a clever cnut that i am to shove the camera on bulb and run up these steps to back light down,gotta be 2 and a half foot or there about so that was fun,only to realise to come back down without a torch on which would ruin the shot was not going to be easy i shouted to Paul to just turn my camera off..im a twat but even im not that thick to try legging it down in the dark.. Quick shot back down After crossing the perfectly safe rusting think metal walkway which crumbled under my feet paul dived in to help with the lighting Didn't fancy the ankle breaking walk to the egg so a shot looking down will do yer Pauls lighting skills again for the one directly below.. and that was my trip to the works which i have to say i enjoyed big time..probably a few more reports to come
  13. Visited with Mookster on a Road Trip So next on our agenda during this total fail of a trip was a mill. Which was sealed. Great. So from there we went onto another mill which was not sealed! Hartford Mill was constructed in 1907 to a design by F.W.Dixon. Hartford is one of the few mills in Oldham to have listed building status. The mill has been granted a Grade II Listed Status. Hartford was extended during its operational years in 1920 and once morea in 1924. The building was powered by a 1500hp Urmson & Thompson steam engine which was capable of driving 120,000 spindles. Hartford closed its doors as a Mill in 1959. In later years it was used as a mail order warehouse by Littlewoods until 1992. The mill has been abandoned since and has been stripped by thieves and trashed and burnt by equally scummy scroates. This was our second successful explore of the Northern part of the trip, but the 4th successful on the road trip and the sixth successful on our week of explores. It was certainly refreshing to be in a vast mill on a lovely afternoon. We had all day to explore and all evening to drive home, so we relaxed into the explore and planned to spend a good few hours on this. Or so we thought. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 About 15 minutes into the explore I see a young girl about 14-15 years old out of one of the windows. I thought nothing of it, kids are always hanging about and lets face it, there are several schools in close proximity to the mill. Me and Mookie discussed this with each other and continued exploring. About 10 minutes later I lean out of a window to see something rising from an outbuilding, me and Mookie once again had a look and suspected wind was blowing up dust so once again went back to our pictures. Onto the next level I had another look and plumes of smoke were coming out of an outbuilding. 35 minutes into this explore we packed up and left, I grabbed my mobile and dialled 999 for the first time in my exploring years and requested the fire brigade. Two fire teams tackled what was probably a small fire, but that’s not the point. I hate to think what the parents are like… #8 I sound like an old man, but I certainly didn’t go round setting fire to buildings. More at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157642738036494/
  14. The park opened in 1983 and was operating seasonally until late 2012. The park was based on the story of 'Camelot, King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table'. The local area was once covered by the largest lake in England Martin Mere, which was first drained in 1692 by Thomas Fleetwood of Bank Hall in Bretherton. The closure of the park was announced by Knights Leisure, in November 2012, the managing director blaming poor summer weather and events such as London 2012 and the Queen's Jubilee for declining visitor numbers. The site's future remains uncertain as the new owner is planning to redevelop the site. Current indications are that this will be a housing development. These pics are from 2 visits to Camelot, probably the last unfortunately as the rude security guard yielding a large stick gave us a good telling off the second time. and even sneakily took photographs of us to 'send to the police!' He shouted and swore for a while about how dangerous the site was and the definition of private land, reminded us that we were massive dickheads, and asked us to leave. Really fun explore, great laugh and beautiful little treasures on a fairy tale wasteland indeed Camelot is, ''The land of great knights, and amazing days.'' ham anyone?
  15. This was a recent accidental stumble upon, Rowlandsway House in Wythenshawe, Manchester. The structure used to accommodate Shell employees, seemed like a pretty standard office block. Access was fairly easy with pretty slack security, but be aware of motion censored alarm/lights in main reception! Planning to go back before further demolishment as want to get more images when i have some proper equipment on me. Horrible building from the outside but internally its quite an interesting explore with some beautiful light in the late afternoon. (google image)
  16. hey

    hey guys! really looking forwards to getting involved with this site, coming here after experiencing a fair amount of hostility and egocentricity from another (which shall not be named) urban exploration forum. a fun and friendly vibe is much more my scene! everyones posts look awesome, currently waiting on some photo's back of a recent trip to Rowlandsway House in Wythenshawe, Manchester - old Shell offices in demolition. peace
  17. Department of Employment, Aytoun St Manchester Not sure if this belongs in this section, and tbh I'm not sure I belong in derps .... Enjoy for what it's worth.. (My excuse, it pissed hard in Manc all week and so drains were a no go) I'll be honest I actually like these kind of places, iconic art decor buildings which sadly have been left to rot yes please! On the flip side a 43 storey new build & TC that will accompany it will make for a good new playground if it ever takes off Law of averages you will get busted at some point (fair) but always seems to be the least expected of places In the end we were surrounded, our exit was class as we powered up the canal We nearly pulled it off, except for plod popping their heads a moment too early.. we would have got away (unlikely) but still I'd like to think that haha All in all a good laugh and in the end we turned out not to be the 'terrorists' they thought we were Just a few pics and a video of the outing, as this was more a last re-visit for old times sake of the place before it's reduced to rubble for me more than anything Give me a drain any day, enjoy... BIG UP FreshFingers//Nickindroy For some reason forum s/w won't alow video link so I'll leave you with this http://youtu.be/Y9YQslOJaT8
  18. UK Thistle Hotel, Manchester - Jan 2014

    Hi All! Can't seam to find any information on this building, but it is a grade 2 listed building . . . . . Visited again with a non-member, and despite he has been here before, decided to show me this one. This time it started to rain quite hard, but decided to press on, hence my camera took a few spots of rain on the lens and a little bluring due to wind
  19. Hello, Visited here recently with a Non- Member. Gave quite good views, apart from it being quite windy and raining, which have a little of my photos some lens flare :-/ Thanks for looking in ;-)
  20. Hello All After deciding to either put our waders on outside someones house, or try to get them on while the local youth are around us, we made our entrance about 20 minutes after! The entrance was quite easy, upon exit the water had decided to enter mine and and a non members waders - Another Non member decided to take a swim with his camera about 15 minutes previous . . . . . Some tilt - Some people hate, some people like - I like annoying the people who hate by using it Another good way to kill an hour
  21. Northern Trip Part 6 – Zuby Fashions (Manchester) So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. So here we go, time for one more before my 200 mile drive back South. We got up early in a shower of rain and bussed to this site. This whole blocked contained various different businesses all clothing firms, with the last closing in 2009, and information of some remaining derelict since 1997. The site was trashed and ripped apart; there was a builder there who was doing a bit of work for the owner who told me that the last guy was closed down because he was copying Nike clothes. Very little remains in this filthy old block and its soon going to be converted. My Lens was really struggling, but thankfully it has now been repaired! So concludes a fantastic weekend up North. I only have Tom to thank for amazing hospitality and being a great guide. The grim north certainly has more derelict potential than the South! Thanks everyone. More At: Zuby Fashion - a set on Flickr
  22. This is an old set of pics from Aug 2012 but I wanted to try out my new image host and haven't posted this on here Situated in one of Manchesters up and coming areas (it can't get an worse) the outfall is a large 9 foot pipe protected by high walls and the waist deep river Once inside it's a casual stroll with a number of nice features The brickwork is stunning inside, the Victorians really didn't mess about when it came to engineering project The Drain Fairy sits inside watching over all those who walk in From here it's not so pleasant The First set of stairs Twin pipes My pic of the penstock blurred so I will have to make a return visit soon
  23. Like a pleb I left my tripod at home when I set out for work today so these are handheld and I had to delete most of them, these are what I have that are presentable. Discovered by Siologen over a decade ago Processor is a collection of Brick, RCP, Poo processors pretty much everything you could want in a drain. Worth saying that as I walked into the processor chamber a rat the size of a small dog ran at me, dodged between my legs and vanished into the darkness. Here's the pics
  24. For the first time in a long while I was able to take my break in Manchester and as I was just on top of it I nipped down to Big Humpty and the Medlock Culvert. Big Humpty is a victorian brick culvert and to be honest that's pretty much all there is to it, the culvert section is relatively short but it's worth going through if you're heading to the Medlock culvert. Big Humpty Medlock Culvert
  25. The back streets around Manchester are littered with old industrial buildings, mills, factories etc, some converted into apartments, some still remain such as this old textile factory. No history i'm afraid but judging by the amount of pigeon shit, old machines and the clothes left behind it's been closed and disused for a good amount of time. Hope you enjoy the pictures...... .. .. .. .. ..
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