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Found 7 results

  1. Without knowing what this place was or even the name of it, we decided to explore this place on the same day as another location very close by. Although totally stripped out inside, what an explore it turned out to be!
  2. St.Mary's Hospital The Explore Visited with @Urbexbandoned We were actually heading towards a school in the area when we noticed the ivy covered frontage of this hospital from the road outside and decided to swing into the carpark. Then we looked right and saw the little building with the fridges that had been appearing in a few recent threads at the time, nice to see the head pillows but that was about it to be honest. Went around the back and stuck my head into the "tramp cells" for a second but decided there must be a little more to this site... Turn 180 degrees... 4 ward hospital.. The History The Workhouse was built in 1836 on the east side of Melton on Thorpe End Road, comprising four wards and spacious yards. It is now St. Mary's Hospital and still serving the local area. When it was built it cost £6000 and was designed to house three hundred people.According to White's trade directory of 1846, it rarely housed more than half of that number at that time. The workhouse was somewhere poor people in the area could go. In return for food and clothing they were given work to do. The former workhouse later became St Mary's Hospital. I can't find much in the way of when this place closed down, I am assuming that because the doors were marked 2010 that this was about right. The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5/6. 7. 8. 9/10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  3. Explored with The Stig, The Wombat and a non-member History A parliamentary report of 1777 recorded a parish workhouse in operation in 'Melton Mobray' with accommodation for up to 40 inmates. In 1835, the workhouse was in the town on Back Street, neither the building nor the street exist today. Melton Mowbray Poor Law Union was officially brought into existence on 26th March 1836. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, with 56 members, representing the 54 constituent parishes. Three parishes were later added - Bescaby (1858), Shoby (1858) and Sysonby with Eye Kettleby (1894). The population falling within the Union at the 1831 census had been 17,872 with parishes ranging in size from Brooksby (population 10) to Melton Mowbray itself (3,356). The average annual poor-rate expenditure for the period 1833-5 had been £9,433 or 10s.7d. per head of the population. A new Union workhouse was built in 1836 on the east side of Thorpe Road in Melton Mowbray. Designed by Charles Dyer, with him adopting an elongated H-plan layout, rather than one of radial layouts more popular at the time. When it was built, it cost £6000 and was designed to house three hundred people. According to White's trade directory of 1846, it rarely housed more than half of that number at that time. The total expenditure of the 54 parishes during the tree years prior to 1836 was £9433. The expenditure of the Union in 1838 was £5793, in 1840 it was £4895-9s. and in 1845, £1172-19-9d. The staff, in 1846 was headed by the master and matron, Mr Joseph and Mrs Jane Bell and there was a chaplain, Rev. G. Oakley. An infirmary designed by RW Johnson was added to the east of the workhouse around 1869-70. At the centre were a surgery. kitchen, and nurse's quarters. Male and female patients had separate entrance, situated to each side. History of Vagrancy Law The first major vagrancy law was passed in 1349 to increase the workforce following the Black Death by making "idleness" (unemployment) an offence. By the 1500s the statutes were mainly used as a means of controlling criminals. In 16th and 17th century England, a vagrant was a person who could work but preferred not to (or could not find employment, so took to the road in order to do so), or one who begs for a living. Vagrancy was illegal, punishable by branding, whipping, conscription into the military, or at times penal transportation to penal colonies. Vagrants were different from impotent poor, who were unable to support themselves because of advanced age or sickness. However, the English laws usually did not distinguish between the impotent poor and the criminals, so both received the same harsh punishments. In 1824, earlier vagrancy laws were consolidated in the Vagrancy Act 1824 (UK) whose main aim was removing undesirables from public view. The act assumed that homelessness was due to idleness and thus deliberate, and made it a criminal offence to engage in behaviours associated with extreme poverty. The Poor Law was the system for the provision of social security in operation in England and Wales from the 16th century until the establishment of the Welfare State in the 20th century. Explore This was a nice easy explore to complete another eventful weekend with Mr and Mrs Stig. No major drama until I wandered round the front to take another look at the morgue and bumped into a couple of coppers outside the main part of the hospital. Just thankful they believed me when I asked for directions to the Maturnity Unit so I could go and see my sister who had given birth the night before. Great to explore with these three again (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) Cheers for Looking
  4. After seeing Urbexbandoned's recent report on this place and knowing of the other two attractions on the same site I would have been a fool not to have gone for a look while I was in the area. Nice little mooch is one with large parts still quite clean and decay starting in others. Pretty much stripped of any stuff but an interesting building with a workhouse history. Thanks for the heads up on this one guys and a massive thanks to Tagger for the help Melton Mowbray Poor Law Union officially came into existence on 26th March 1836. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, 56 in number, representing its 54 constituent parishes. A Union workhouse was built in 1836 at the east side of Thorpe Road in Melton Mowbray. It was designed by Charles Dyer and adopted an elongated H-plan layout, rather than one of radial layouts more popular at the time. An infirmary designed by RW Johnson was erected at the east of the workhouse in 1869-70. At the centre were a surgery. kitchen, and nurse's quarters. Male and female patients had separate entrance to each side. A vagrants' block was located at the south of the workhouse. It contained work cells for stone-breaking at the southern side. The cells walls contained outlet grids through which were placed the small pieces of broken stone. The former workhouse later became St Mary's Hospital which seems to have shut in 2010. 1 2 3 4 5 6/7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15/16 17/18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Thanks For Looking
  5. History The Workhouse was built in 1836 on the east side of Melton on Thorpe End Road, comprising four wards and spacious yards. It is now St. Mary's Hospital and still serving the local area. When it was built it cost £6000 and was designed to house three hundred people.According to White's trade directory of 1846, it rarely housed more than half of that number at that time. The workhouse was somewhere poor people in the area could go. In return for food and clothing they were given work to do. The former workhouse later became St Mary's Hospital. I can't find much in the way of when this place closed down, I am assuming that because the doors were marked 2010 that this was about right. The Explore Visited with Hamtagger, after checking out something else in the area and it being too light we decided to head on to the next place. Not too far away. Anyway we were literally heading down this road and saw this building. HT immediately pulled in and parked up. A few other cars about so not out of place. Getting our stuff out of the car we glanced round and saw the little mortuary building to the right. Door had been busted in. As it was pointed out to me, one bit of advice I would give is if your desperate for a pic of a mortuary fridge make sure that you don't post pictures online with the glass in the door intact and the door nailed shut and the next lot of pics from inside the place! Massive fail! On with the explore, we checked out the little mortuary, I wasn't personally interested in the Vagrancy cells to be honest. I had seen it posted online a lot over the last couple of weeks. I was more interested in the hospital. We ventured round and soon found ourselves inside the hospital itself. Now, we had got a bit confused thinking that this was the Memorial Hospital, after all we had literally just pulled in to the car park not even knowing what it was. We spent a good 3 hours here and if I am blatantly honest I don't see how this place has been missed at all! Situated just 20 yards to the left of the mortuary building, obviously empty and it hadn't yet been reported on?! (Do correct me if I am wrong, I am sure that someone will). Really nice explore, all the time completely shocked that there wasn't a single bit of Graffiti, nothing had been smashed. It was literally left how it had been and bearing in mind this hospital has been closed at least 5 years. Perfect! A good few bits to see here, some really nice decay in places too. Still retaining someof it's original workhouse charm too with some of the windows and interior architecture. Right on with the pics! The Mortuary The Hospital
  6. History King Edward VII Secondary School, which opened in 1910, was originally known as the County Grammar School of King Edward VII; the school can be found in Melton Mowbray, on a 56 acre green field site. The first headteacher, Dr Fred Hodson, was appointed in 1909 and thereafter he oversaw the selection of all other teaching staff. In the beginning, however, the schools name was initially challenged, since they had not sought royal authorisation, and the matter subsequently became far more complicated when the King died May 6th 1910. To resolve the problem the school were forced to appeal to MPs before the Board of Education. After much debate and consideration, the new King finally declared that his father’s name was ‘indeed a splendid choice’. By 1912, the school hosted its first ever sports day and also divided its students into houses: Belvoir (Red), Cottesmore (Yellow) and Quorn (Blue). Each of the houses competed against one another in events that included: pillow fighting, needle-threading, bean bag races, skipping races and athletics. By 1931, plans for extensions to the school were inaugurated and by 1936 the construction of a new assembly hall was set underway. Furthermore, the science block was replaced with a modernised two storey block and more classrooms were built. In the 1940s the Old Grammarians started a memorial fund to construct a pavilion for the school, in memory of those who died during the First World War, and for those who were dying in the Second. After the Second World War, after a period of relative stability and consistency, the school was renamed in 1964 (to King Edward VII Upper School). This change was part of wider plans in the area to close the Boy’s Modern School and the Sarson Girl’s School; both of which were located within the local vicinity. The school continued to grow in successive years and in 1975 a new sixth form was opened, alongside a larger sports hall. The music centre and all-weather pitch were opened more recently, in 1991, followed by the sports centre in 1996. By 1997 the school also gained Technology College status. As King Edward VII entered the 2000s, it was regarded as both a national and international leader in the use of ICT, since it had networked hubs in every subject area, video conferencing facilities and wireless networking for laptops across the entire site. By 2004, the school had over 500 computers. Nonetheless, despite its reputation, and the fact that the school was designated as a Regional Training School for research and ICT, the decision to close the entire site was passed in 2010 (it closed its doors later in 2011). King Edwards VII was closed because it was predicted that falling student numbers would eventually make the running costs of the school unsustainable. Over the years King Edwards fostered a notable list of famous former pupils; some of these include: Graham Chapman (Monty Python), Paul Anderson (Footballer) and Dave Benson Phillips (Comedian/TV Presenter). Our Version of Events Melton Mowbray, the place you visit for the country’s best pork pie: that was the full extent of our knowledge before we arrived at King Edwards. We’ve passed the area a few times on our travels and, as far as we were aware, there was a pork pie factory there. As it turns out, there’s actually a whole town there too. So, still rather stunned with this new found discovery, and with a somewhat nostalgic KM_Punk, we set off in the direction of his old school. Access was novel to say the least, and we had to avoid the sports centre nearby since it is still used by clubs and teams. But, we managed it and there was still plenty to see across the buildings we explored. While most of the tables and chairs have been removed, there’s still plenty of evidence that King Edwards was indeed a school, and hopefully the pictures reveal this. Unfortunately, however, we only managed to access the English, Humanities and ICT classrooms, the photography and design and technology workshops and the arts and drama studio. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Soul and KM_Punk. 1: King Edward VII Upper School 2: One of the Main Corridors 3: Trumpet 4: Media Classroom 5: Photography Class 6: Photography Room 7: Remaining Photographs 8: Photograph Basin 9: Technology Workshop 10: Bits and Pieces in the Technology Department 11: Technology Store Room 12: Technology Shelves 13: The Main Hall 14: A Student Guide to King Edward's 15: The Drama Studio 16: Drama Studio Staircase 17: Drama Studio from the Other Side 18: Accessible Lift 19: Old Art Sink 20: Map of King Edwards 21: Science Classroom 22: Misc Props (Drama) 23: Strange Hub in the Middle of the School 24: Technology Classroom Tool Cupboard 25: Technology Storage Area 26: English Classroom 27: Languages Classroom 28: Staff Office 29: Traditional School Wall Decor 30: ICT Classroom
  7. The hospital in Melton Mowbray started life as Hill House and was built pre 1760. In 1840 Colonel Charles Wyndham moved to the area due to his passion for fox hunting and rented Hill House. He changed the name to Wyndham Lodge in traditional hunting fashion. It was later purchased by William Chaplin who had the entire house rebuilt in Wartnaby stone in 1874. In 1920 Col Richard Dalgleish purchased Wyndham lodge as a gift to the town. In honour of those who had fallen during the great war it became known as Melton & District War Memorial Hospital. The hospital closed in 2005 and has been left to let nature take over. 1. 2. 3. 2010 4. 2014 As you can see time doesn't stand still. 5. 6. 7. Hope you enjoyed for a few more pics check The War Memorial Hospital on my site.
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