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Found 39 results

  1. UK Abandoned train yard/factory (cinematic)

    Hi and happy new year! Here’s a short video of a recent explore of Healey Mills marshalling Yard and Dudfleet mill - thanks for watching!
  2. History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
  3. History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  4. Visited with @albino jay and @GK-WAX and thanks again to jay for doing the driving and I also stole your history mate because I couldn’t find any hope you don’t mind. We was passing by the mill on our way home so popped in for a look. And glad we did I like these old mills. And the demo team were already on site so don’t know how long it has left to stand. So here’s the history and pics.. Steam-powered worsted-spinning mill built around 1850 on Black Brook. Owners and tenants of the mills have included James Nutton & Company [1863] John Horsfall & Sons Limited [1896] F. K. Adcock & Company [1936] Part of the Mills are still standing though no longer used. The mill had a 170 ft tall chimney which was struck by lightning in 1967. The chimney was reduced in height – to avoid further strikes – and was finally demolished in March/April 1992 The majority of the Mills were demolished in 2017. The mill by Lavino lavino[/ The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/H2Q9pV]The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  5. UK A Mine and Mill in Scotland

    This was an old Mine and Mill in Scotland I visited that has been around since the 1820s it was rebuilt after WWII when German Bombers dropped inceduries onto it. The lift and mine shaft to the mine is still pretty much intact so I think it may be possible to maybe descend with a rope into the mine it's self. There was a CCTV camera on one of the windows of the buildings but I'm sure this was a fake one and just there as a deterent to looters. It is the first explore I have done where vandals and looters havent yet ransacked the area so I decided to keep the name of the area private but if anyone wants to visit then shoot me a pm.
  6. first report in a while, been busy in france + havent seen anything from this place so thought id share it. It was one of those lucky stumble upon by accident explores, which are always nice, certainly not epic to look at but its nice knowing every corner you walk round is going to be something new that you wont have seen it on someone elses report already. I was actually in the area looking for waterfalls to go and have a jungle shower as we'd been camping up the road, zigged when i should have zagged and came across this. couldnt find much history apart from the local rag circa feb 09 and little from historic england historic england- HISTORY: Tansley Wood Mill is a substantially complete example of a late C18, first generation water- powered textile factory, whose form is strongly influenced by, and is a near-contemporary of Sir Richard Arkwright's pioneering cotton spinning factory at nearby Cromford. The site retains clear evidence of phased development, and of the enhancement of its water power-producing capacity, https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1389284 local rag Plans to convert a former Tansley textile mill into flats and offices have been given the go-ahead. Council chiefs gave the green light to a major redevelopment of Tansley Wood Mills, in Lower Lumsdale, on Tuesday. The historic woodland building is to be restored and redeveloped after officers said the scheme would regenerate what was formerly an important employment site. Plans, submitted by applicant Paddock Motors, include converting the Grade II-listed mill into flats, turning the old forge building into a restaurant, four craft studios, office space and commercial units. Planning co-ordinator for the scheme, Bill Clay, said: "It is an exceptional attractive and special location in this historical wooded valley. "It is a wonderful environment to be working in, particually as we are local people. What we are doing is finding a new use for an important historical building and ensuring it has a future. "It is also a very important employment site, historically, and we want to take it into the future in terms of returning it to an employment site." District council planning officers said the site would benefit nature conservation, landscape restoration and secure the future of a listed building. A previous bid to develop the building was rejected by the Secretary of State in 2005, saying it could be detrimental to the character and appearance of the area. Read more: http://www.matlockmercury.co.uk/news/local/tansley-mill-s-conversion-plan-is-approved-1-871469#ixzz4BCYQORUw picturegraphs IF anyone knows what the flying fuck this is can you let me know and lets not forget the real reason i was in thee valley thanks for looking kids, happy explorin
  7. Hi there :), Our new video from abandoned Lidwig´s mill was shot in the middle of our capital. We have been founding the enter about 30 minutes, it was so secured we were afraid of captured by police, but everything goes well . No one was in the mill for three years. And it was awesome. Till now the best object i was in. In the machine was always a seed. We decided to add also a timelapse and a longer scenes. Video also includes also perscpetcive from the top . Enjoy and please subsrcibe .
  8. Abandoned Paper Mill, UK Visited with: Alex Visit Date: April 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. My Visit I had been wanting to visit the mill for some time, however, I kept pushing this one aside for a rainy day. Eventually myself & Alex decided it was time.... This would be my first visit and Alex's second. So, early on a soggy, wet, rainy and very windy April morning we set off to what would turn out to be one of the best & most enjoyable explores I have been on. The entry to the mill I knew was going to be tricky because Alex had told me the way in when planning the visit. Lots of climbing was needed and the main thing I was thinking was do not rush and avoid any areas that look a little sketchy. It worked and we both made it in without any issues. Now, I knew the mill was a large site after seeing many other photos from people who had been here and within a few minutes of dropping in the scale of this place became a reality! I am no expert in the process of making paper so I will only state what I have read as to what the machinery was used for. I think the yellow machines in this photo fed the pipes in the following photos. I spent a good amount of time in this room due to all the pipework shooting off in different directions. I love lines and angles and this area had plenty to go at. From what I have read the pipes were for feeding pulp into machines on a lower floor. It makes sense as you can see the pipes attached to the ceiling feeding the pipes on the other side of the room that dissapear into the floor. The mill has plenty of large rooms that could have been used for many things such as storage & packaging. Here are a few photos of these spaces. It is always good to get a feel for the people who worked in these places and when you find the brew / changing rooms it kind of brings you back to reality. People once worked here, this was their income for paying the bills, but sadly no more. The different characters that would have been in these rooms over the years and the stories they have told. Does anyone think that this was the male changing room! And no, not because it is messy.... Situated in the middle of the main working areas we found the brew room which consisted of two floors for people to sit and relax whilst on their breaks. A shower room and another changing room are situated off to the side but I never took a photo, why I hear you ask... because my brain gave out on me and I forgot. I remember thinking that it must have been very noisy in here due to the fact that it is surrounded on all sides by large machinery. All I know about these machines is that they were used for rolling the paper. The room is crammed from wall to wall with machinery with only a central isle to walk down. Do you remember earlier in the report that I said the pulp was fed through the pipes and down to machines on a lower floor? Well these are the machines that was fed the pulp. What happened to the pulp at this stage I have absolutely no idea. The room was very dark (and hard to photograph) and I remember when entering feeling like I had been taken back in time to the industrial revolution. Lots of metal on show, dirt, pipes & strange looking machines it was very surreal. I can imagine this area being very hot and noisy with lots of sweaty dirty workers going about their tasks. As well as all the machines there was also a good amount of office space here. Most was very badly decayed or trashed but I did find this room rather interesting. Ok so back to the working areas... This is the largest area we came across on the visit, lots of different areas within one floor all working together in what you could call a production line. Again I got a surreal feeling here due to the fact that at one time this place would have been bustling with people and noise. Now though, nothing, nothing other than the sounds of our footsteps and the rain hitting the roof. Tucked away in the corner of this area we found three forklifts parked up. They look in very good working order and I am sure if you had the keys they would start up. The final photo is of an area where one of the end results is stacked up on pallets and either moved to storage or loaded onto wagons. There is still some paper stacked on pallets that will have come down the conveyors as you can see in the photo. Behind me is two very large shutter doors that open to a loading area. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Lotus Hall aka Cuckoo Hall on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/119757413@N07/ Final thoughts To me having a fantastic location to see is only 50% of what makes a good trip the other is great company and this day had both, I loved every minute we spent here. There was so much to see and with every room being different it allowed your mind to try and figure out and imagine what the area was used for and the communal areas made you think of the people who worked here..... To me that is what exploring is all about! With the size of this place I am sure myself & Alex will have missed some areas and I would love to revisit here at some point. The mill instantly became one of my favorite locations that I have been lucky enough to see and rightly so. Finally, thanks to my good Friend Alex for the company as always. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  9. No history unfortunately, and it will soon be luxury apartments Narrowly avoiding death with Raz, Jamie_P & Rott3nWood. The Explore; So we went for a look at the Conditioning House but other than teleportation i couldnt see a way in. So not worth traversing a wall with concreted glass on the top and a gate covered in Razor Wire... Still always come out with a positive right so going with that frame of mind, if i'd have slipped i'd have received ghetto acupuncture free of charge - Sweet So over the road we went and after crossing the needle forrest (Not nice pine needles if you catch my drift) we had a look around this place. Nothing spectacular and not really worth the risk of aids or being mauled by the dogs loose in the building or even the dodgey as fook floors but i still managed to chuck together a decent amount of photos; Thanks for looking
  10. Morning all, Explored with Raz So this was a while ago, but as im nearing the end of my back log of reports i thought id post it up for you Bit of background Founded by Joseph Rank in 1875, with the Hull site (Clarence Mill) opening in 1885. It was the first mechanically driven flour mill using steel rollers instead of grinding stones and this produced 6 sacks of flour per hour instead of 1 and a half which was the accepted good rate of production. Such revolutionary technology paved the way for modern flour mills today. During the second world war Hull was prone to heavy bombing runs by the Luftwaffe and the mill was "redesigned" by hitlers flying army and so what you see today (If it is infact still there as the demolition was in full swing last i checked) is a rebuild around the original silos. The factory closed in 2005 and yet still in April this year, 10 years after closure the flour on the floor could give the impression that it was closed only yetserday. The Explore First stop of the day on our trip to Costa Del Hull (T'Yorkshire one, not the one darn sarth) and first of all i was amazed at how easy access was. Raz was telling me about rats the size of dogs and i was bitterly dissapointed i didnt get to see any of these beasts but it was easy to see why, everywhere you looked the floor was covered in bright blue corn... corn isnt normally blue as far as im aware but im northern so what do i know? So i can only assume this was some crazy poison that made even the corpses disolve as we found none. Anyway, good mooch about over some incredibly dodgey floors with some sickening drops below. The roof is a good old place to chill with views out over the city itself and also out over the Humber Estuary and the Deep. Thanks for looking, dont forget to check out my facebook page where i post most my pictures; www.facebook.com/seldomseenworldue
  11. The history of Robert Fletcher & sons paper mill dates back to the industrial revolution. The company was once owned by Ralph Crompton and Nephews, producers and bleachers of paper. Their first mill was located in Stoneclough, Manchester. The death of the Crompton brothers left the mill ownerless and the succession was offered to Robert Fletcher, the mill’s manager at the time. Fletcher had risen through the ranks, to first become the manager of the bleaching department and later the whole mill. Following Fletcher’s death on 17th May 1865, his sons John and James took over. They in turn passed down the mill to their sons, also named John and James. In 1897 the mill was incorporated as a limited company. In 1921 a second mill opened, located at Greenfield, near Oldham. The mill specialised in the production of cigarette paper and at its height employed 1000 people to run seven paper machines. These machines produced only a fraction of the paper the later, much larger machines could produce. Upon closure the mill had three machines – two very similar lines from 19XX and a huge modern 1996 addition. By 1986 the company was making a loss and was purchased by the Melton Medes Conglomerate who turned the company around and started to make a profit once again. However by 2001 the company was once again failing and the decision was made to close the Stoneclough Mill. Some people were transferred to the Greenfield mill, but the company could not sustain the increasing loses and was forced into receivership. The mill was closed down overnight. The mill at Stoneclough has been demolished. To this day the mill at Greenfield still remains how it was the day it closed. Streams of paper remain inside the machines, connected to the rolls of finished product at the end of the production lines – a time capsule from a bygone era. Wood Pulp Treatment and Preparation Paper starts off as wood bails which is turned into a pulp using machines, then bleached. The rolling machines The rolling machines form the pulp into sheets. Spooling Machines and Packing Area The sheets are fed onto reels and cut to size Offices and Staff Areas Newer Machine Room This huge machine was a later addition an is much more modern than the rest of the machinery.
  12. Explored with Raz & Rott3nW00d History By 1920 extensive railway sidings had been developed on the railway line eastsoutheast of Healey, named Healey Mill Sidings. In the 1960s, as part of a modernisation plan, the sidings were re-designed for more efficient wagon load handling. Construction included cutting a new channel over 1,000 yards long for the River Calder south of the original, levelling of the site with over 1 million cubic yards of infill, the re-construction and extension of a road bridge at the east end of the site near Horbury Bridge, the construction of three railway bridges over the River Calder, and diversion of gas and electricity mains. The new yard was built as a hump shunting (gravity) yard capable of handling 4,000 wagons a day. The reception sidings were built west of the River Calder, the main yard was built on the extended site of the former sidings. The main control tower was located south of the main line and the Calder Vale Dye Works near to the river.The yard opened in 1963 at a cost of £3.5 million. The diesel motive power depot at Healey Mills (Healey Mills Diesel Depot or Healey Mills TMD) opened in 1967. After the marshalling yard closed in 1987, the site was used for storage of trains and locomotives. After the privatisation of British Rail the site was operated by EWS; an assessment was made of a future requirement of six long doubled ended sidings and further short single ended sidings. After 2010 the site's use was limited to crew changes; the driver depot at Healey Mills closed in 2012, being relocated to portacabins at Wakefield Kirkgate station after 4 February 2012. Explore & Cildhood Memories; This is certainly not a new one for me, having spent a lot of my childhood in Ossett i was down at this rail yard clambering about as much as i could. I was really quite shocked when i arrived yesterday to find that the place had been emptied!! When i used to go down there were hundreds of carriages and loads of diesel loco's. I remember many a sunny afternoon pretending to drive this bad boys around... I also remember a lot of nettles. Anyway, whilst in the area we decided to nip down for a mooch about and although it wasnt as good as it used to be, i had a good time reliving my childhood If you got this far, thanks for looking
  13. Still miles behind in posting some reports up, but this was from an small trip to Engerlandshire and Welsheepshugger land between Xmas and New Year. First stop of this particular cold morning was one of two mills I visited. The first is known as Tweed Mill, and access is not the easiest, but a bit of decent balance and no stopping half way over its simple enough for what is a bit of a gem of a little mill. Ever since I first saw this place appear on the forums a few years ago, I knew it was right up my street, lots of nice natural decay, and plenty of bits left behind to see!! The second mill, only a mile up the road, was jam packed with machines, making it a bit harder to get the images I wanted, but did my best, known as the Wool Mill. Many thanks for looking, as always, click the pics if you want to see more or visit my Flickr
  14. Explored with Raz History; Dalton Mills was once the largest textile mill in the region, employing over 2000 workers. It was built by Joseph Craven in 1869, replacing the original mill which was owned by Rachel Leach in the 1780's. The mill was named Dalton Mills after the manager employed by Rachel Leach, a man called Dalton. In its heyday between 1869 and 1877 the mill provided jobs for workers all over Keighley and the Worth Valley. As the textile industry declined, the fortunes of Dalton Mills changed and up until 2004, it had been virtually empty for almost a decade. John Craven, the great-great grandson of Joseph, who had built the mill, eventually chose to sell Dalton Mills, to ensure it’s survival. Part of the renovation of the Clock Tower has included restarting the landmark clock which has not ticked for 25 years. In the mill's heyday, thousands of workers relied on the clock to get to work on time, but the hands had not moved for a quarter of a century.The clock was repaired, so it can display the time to the whole of Dalton Lane again. The explore; After a couple of failed attempts we returned with new resolve! Mishing through pikey yards and trying every window we could find we finally found our way in! Past asbestos warnings and fire damage into the most asthetically pleasing mill i've ever seen. Workshops, large open spaces and the signs of redevelopment. Plus an extremely dodgey floor! - what else can you want? Few snaps from the day; Dirty bit of HDR to finish If you got this far, thanks for looking
  15. Explored with -Raz- History from -Raz- report, hope you dont mind mate Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. The power of the Derwent was used from medieval times to run a corn-mill, dying and fulling mills, and iron and scythe forges. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son. To design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. Later, and more successful, attempts at fire-proofing are embodies in the Dyehouse building, near the bridge. Whilst almost all the early mill buildings were demolished in the 1950s and ‘60s, much of the associated industrial housing has survived. Many of these houses were built by the Strutts, from the late 18th century onwards, transforming Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. The Strutts also built the school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers, helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The Explore; Not much to say about this one other than theres some really small holes under less than structually sound walls, and some really comfy car seats. decent mish out! Photos; If you got this far, thanks for reading
  16. Evening all, So whats the first thing you think of when you think yorkshire?? tea? pudding? terriers?? im going to assume its not the production of little wooden shoes! however, low and behold here we have just that, originally producing some of the finest wooden brothel creepers in the north, the walkleys clog mill turned into a popular tourist attraction throughout the 80s but tragically fell upon hard times during the 90s and also suffered a substantial fire which wrote it off as an attraction, walkleys sold the site to focus on the operational factory which is still running today. Planning was passed for conversion of the walkleys mill into apartments back in 2006 however nothing has been done with it since. The explore I dont think i made much of an effort with any photos i took here, if you can imagine mac from predator when hes got the mini gun and he's tearing down the rain forest with it, that's basically what i did with my camera, i ran around the place in about 6 mins with the camera on auto, the rest of the time i was playing in ball pits, sliding down slides and playing in wendy houses this place is great fun, its nothing beautiful to look at but there is plenty going on in the place and its just a great little explore to have a good time and a little mess around in! When we pulled up we were greeted by a couple of other "explorers" who it turns out had been pottering about for about 20 minutes trying to find a way in, not sure if explorers was the right term for these boys as they werent really built for this past time bless em. After a quick scout of the perimeter we found our way in, the two big guys stood and watched with sad faces as we did things they knew they simply wouldn't be physically able to, oh yeah this was after one of the big lads invited me to kick a door in with him....hmmmm yeeeeah-maybe another time mate?!? ??: Anyway yeah so we managed to get in without any potential criminal damage or breaking and entering charges, we were on the first floor and i had just started fiddling with a piece of old machinery when i hear the pissing alarm going off, the other 3 had gone down to the ground floor and set it off, we bailed out onto the roof and waited out the alarm and to see if any secca turned up, no one turned up but looks the like ground floor is out of bounds kids! knowing this we headed up to the second floor where we found the slides, ball pit and other fun stuff, santas grotto, weird little dolls, manakins, loads of really random stuff in this place, hence why its a little pic heavy, not because ive tae loads of good photos, just because there was so much going on in the place! Toffee and taste l'histoire from their website. Walkley Clogs is a clog factory where the great British clog is manufactured in its entirety. The company was started by Frank Walkley in 1946. The main styles manufactured at that time were the Safety boot clog, Derby, Gibson and the Bar clog. With slipon styles being produced much later. In 1978 Frank Walkley bought out the famous Maude clog sole works in Hebden Bridge, a company that at its hey day had over 100 employees that turned nothing but clog soles! Walkey Clogs still uses the old machines for turning the wooden clog soles, and manufacturing the irons. The clog making skills used are those skills that have been passed down from generations of Walkley Clogs clog makers. Many of our older clog customers will remember Gordon and Nelson real lovely characters, and John who only recently retired a few years ago.. and not forgetting Arthur who up to 86 years of age still worked making the Walkley clogs for two days a week. Walkey Clogs is proud to keep the old traditional styles and over the years has manufactured many more styles that fit in with today’s markets. Most years Walkley Clogs are seen on the cat walks, and every year work with budding fashion designers who always have their own ideas on clog design. Today Walkley clogs manufactures a wide range of styles of clogs which include wooden sandals and slip-ons and various types of boots and shoes in a good selection of colours. The uppers used are mainly leather but also a non leather clog can be manufactured if required. The company also produces a lovely range of children’s clogs styles and supplies clog dance teams in the UK with dancing clogs. Walkley clogs produces 40 styles plus and offers to make up custom made clogs in any style and any colour. and some photolaughs I DONT BLOODY THINK SO MY OLD FRUIT! CAN YOU SEE THE MOUSE!! ...playing the waiting game thanks for looking kids, take it sleazy!!
  17. Recently moving into the area ive been finding some great little treasures, this is pretty much on my door step. Spotted at night whilst on way back from a night/star shoot and went back in day for a recce. I believe this has never been done so wasn't very hopeful. Looked well sealed, with metal sheets and a monitored system mmhh! One morning see me do a solo trip down road. I found a tricky entry point and in. The bottom floor is monitored with flashy red lights, quick exit and home to bathe in my success Constructed in 1897 with giant oak king post roof trusses, galleried landing and oak beamed floors with about 8,000 sq.ft. on each floor. Gordon Tulley bought the Gleadells Mill site around ten years ago, but has struggled to find private investors to back his project. He had previously planned to transform the derelict mill into modern apartments, but adjusted the plans to suit the demand for housing. Mr Tulley wanted to demolish the building to make space for 45 to 50 homes as part of a £4 million project to rejuvenate the area. The 'To be demolished' notice refers only to the sheds built of sheeting. The brick-built block has planning consent for conversion to residential use. Recently sold to a Doncaster based developer Hannabal Riley, he is seeking approval from North Lincolnshire Council to pull down the mill, he told planners he intends to clear the site and leave it vacant until a decision is made on its future use. The 117-year-old North Lincolnshire farm mill now looks set to be demolished to make way for new homes. The move comes ten years after plans from a Gainsborough-based developer were approved to renovate the mill for use as 55 residential apartments, 11 garages and five offices. This was only reported a few months ago, so this year may see the end for Gleadell's Mill. Time will tell. There is not a lot to see in here but its in great condition, id describe it as a mini bass maltings Hope you enjoyed the post
  18. While in the area me and Raz took a quick look in this small mill that was full of little treats. access was easy although it is on a main road and unfortunately i don't quite recall the name of this one. ill keep it short as usual so here you go... Thanks guys
  19. Ceulan Woollen Mill was one of 5 woollen mills in Tal-y-Bont and was situated on the banks of the river Ceulan (the other 4 were located on the Leri) It was built in 1847 by the Morris family and although the exact date that production/operation actually started is vague it was definitely working in 1860. Due to the success of the mill an extension was added in 1880. The water wheel is still on the side of the mill, although, it is not in great shape and is barely visible. The iron hub of the wheel is marked J Edgar Dublin and has 12 wooden spokes. The iron rim is marked Ellis Foundry 1891. The wheel was an overshot although the wooden trough carrying the water to the top of the wheel is no longer in situ. The wheel provided power for the factory and was the first provider of electricity to the houses of Tal-y-Bont which was the first rural village in Cardiganshire/Ceredigion to have any form of electricity. The clergy at Bethel Chapel decided to do away with the oil lamps and discussion was had about carbide lamps being used instead. Mr Morris announced he could provide electricity for the chapel, the houses and the main road. The parish council paid £10.00 per annum for street lighting and houses were charged 5 shillings (25p) for one 60W lamp which then cost a further seven shillings and sixpence for 3 months electricity supply. Mr Morris turned off the power at 10.30pm each night believing that was late enough for folk to be awake! To meet the increasing demand for electricity a peloton wheel was purchased and placed at the other end of the factory to add to the power generated by the main wheel. The factory produced cloth and flannel mainly for shirts for farmers and coal miners throughout mid and south Wales but production and profits suffered during the war. Although things picked up after the war ultimately it was unable to compete with the larger factories that were significantly bigger and were using (what was then) modern new machinery which was more efficient. After diversifying and turning part of the mill into a shop to sell the products directly to the public the mill eventually closed in 1962 although it still remains within the same family. A number of years ago the current owner tried to pass the property and machinery to the National Trust for preservation but as the owner was unable to provide some of the funding to restore/repair the mill the National Trust were unable to take the property. Unfortunately i left my tripod in the car, and had lost my proper torch so the pictures are not all that good. the dark patch you can see is the shadow from my wide angle caused by flash. history stolen from Oxygen Thief. the peloton wheel
  20. Two explores in one, a kinda crappy cottage and a suprisngly quaint church in a former Mill building! Half Cottage, only half of it remained! Mill Church Thanks for looking!!
  21. In between Euro jaunts I done some UK bits... This was one of em... A revisit to the rather splendid... ....TONE MILLS.... Thanks for lookin'
  22. Back from the latest mini road trip with Lost aka Hector Scorn. We set off for a easy leisurely drive down the road with a quick stop in past a old asylum that is well under way to being demo'd, quite sad really but always good to see it one last time, pics of that will follow sometime. Off we set again to reach our destination and find a nearby spot to get some sleep for the night before hitting this derpy derp that has eluded me 3 times in the past. Parking up in a quiet car park I decided to camp it outside and went off to set up the tent, it was a bit windy, but wasn't too cold out. Getting into the tent, the wind picked up, I should've pitched my tent elsewhere, it was getting battered everywhere! The next problem was it turned out the car park we were in was a dogging car park, so whilst I was hidden away in a tent, Lost was being entertained by several cars throughout the night obvisously wanting a bit of promiscuous fun ahahahah! Early morning was soon around and after maybe only 2 hours total sleep we were packed up and off in search of my nemsis. Previous visits we had been caught by Secca, couldn't find a way in and found a fire engine there the last time. Not to be detered we made our way down a different route to the site, no Secca to be seen or heard, just the geese making lots of noise! After a good 40 minutes of searching we made eventually found a route in and with some difficutly navigated it. We were in, inside the derp that has been on my list for so long, but never been able to get done. Today would be different. Time was up, but I could've wandered around here for so much longer, this has to be one of the most under rated sites going about. Fantastic machinery left, not a lot of pikeyness going on and hardly any graffiti. To say I was impressed would be a huge understatement, this was everything I had dreamed it would be and sooo much more. Thanks for looking!
  23. Millennium Mills History The Millennium Mills is a derelict turn of 20th century flour mill in West Silvertown on the south side of the Royal Victoria Dock, between the Thames Barrier and the ExCel exhibition centre alongside the newly built Britannia village, in Newham, London, England. Along with Millennium Mills, there remains a small section of the now destroyed Rank Hovis Premier Mill and a restored grade II listed grain silo, labelled the ‘D’ silo. Described as a "decaying industrial anachronism standing defiant and alone in the surrounding subtopia", the Millennium Mills has become a well-loved icon of post-industrial Britain and has made its way into many aspects of popular culture, being used as a backdrop in films and television shows such as Ashes to Ashes and Derek Jarman's The Last of England. Millennium Mills is also a destination for Urban Explorers despite high security, dangers of structural weakness, ten-storey drops and asbestos, and there are many reports and internal photos of the site. My visit I had been wanting to visit this place for over a year, I heard that original access via Leap of Faith had be plugged, and there hadn't been any reports for a fair while, so I assumed it was not doable. I was itching to get my teeth into something and this was just the ticket!! A quick beverage was had with Southside Assassin and Gabe, I was pleased to hear there were lots of explores on the cards that night, we had a couple of successful ones and two fails, towards the end of the the long walk around London Southside called it a day, all credit to him he had been working all day and had to make his way home. It was getting early/late and the old legs of this old boy were getting a bit tired! but I had to wait for train home anyway, so Gabe and I headed over to Millenium Mills, this was the jewel in the crown for me, this was the big one! I had seen reports from 2013 and had to visit! So we finally got there and after a little brush with security, we managed to evade them with our ninja stealth skills lol ok more like Gabes expertise we were in and headed straight up to the roof! As soon as I was in that Mill and on that roof, the tiredness just went, I reckon it must have been the excitement of being in such an awesome place, the 5hr walk flew by and seemed like 2, an amazing place and I need to visit again, this place is addictive, Hope you enjoy the report! Like to say a massive thanks to Gabe for getting me in this place and the fabulous tour of the mill, couldn't have asked for a better explore guide! Top Man! On roof Inside Very strange surreal sight this was for me, sort of thing you expect to see in a "Saw" film Room with a view Couldn't resist going with the fan shot, even though been done to death! Thanks for looking! Sorry for soo many photographs! love the place though!
  24. UK 'The Tonedale Coners' Feb '14

    On the way back from another site, I thought I'd swing by and have a crack at finding these lovely looking machines... After finding my access to the site, which was hampered by a constant stream of dog walkers, I soon realised that the site has CCTV on every bloody corner! But with time ticking away, I thought 'sod it!' And just ignored them!! Really glad I ticked these off, they look ACE!! Thanks for lookin in!
  25. I haven’t been able to find a great deal of history on this place. Originally owned by H & R Ainscough the mill was acquired by Allied and the closure of the factory was announced in 1995 along with a plan to close 2 other mills and refurbish / modernise another 12 existing Mills around the country. The Mill finally closed in 1998 and was purchased by Persimmon Homes as part of a redevelopments plan to convert the building into Mill apartments. I can only assume that plans have stalled due to the recent poor economic climate.The building currently stands abandoned. After our trip to Camelot Theme Park we were on the hunt for another spot close by and this one was suggested. None of our group had ever visited the mill so we didn’t quite know what to expect but when we got closer and we could still see the chimney we were hopeful there might still be something to explore. Having now viewed a few reports from the mid 1990′s I can see that the places has really gone down hill and a lot of the cool features have been removed. The building itself is becoming a bit of a death trap with floors crumbling and machinery removed leaving significant drops often concealed by chipboard sheeting. Highlight for me was access to one of the higher rooftops which gave us a great view of the sprawling housing estates which surround the Mill. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Thanks for looking a few more shots and a video on my blog: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2013/04/14/urbex-allied-flour-mill-ainscough-mill-burscough-lancashire-march-2013/
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