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Found 8 results

  1. UK WESTLETON. Suffolk. January 2016

    Visited with clarexplres and cheers for the heads up from Black Shuck a few months ago.... But as usual I only just got round to this nice post now. An hours drive and walking up the wrong side of the field to try and find the ROC post to start off with and eventually we were on our way in This was the 1st time I had been in a ROC Post and actually felt how cramped it must have been down there. With stuff strewn everywhere you could hardly more. This site is listed as locked on the Outdated Subrit site and you can see from the images it has not just been opened up recently either.... So get out there checking other ones folks. This particular post opened March 1958 and closed September 1991 What are they Royal Observer Corps Monitoring Posts are underground structures all over the United Kingdom, constructed as a result of the Corps' nuclear reporting role and operated by volunteers during the Cold War between 1955 and 1991. In all but a very few instances the posts were built to a standard design consisting of a 14-foot-deep access shaft, a toilet/store and a monitoring room. The most unusual post was the non-standard one constructed in a cellar within Windsor Castle. Almost half of the total number of posts were closed in 1968 during a reorganisation and major contraction of the ROC. Several others closed over the next 40 years as a result of structural difficulties i.e. persistent flooding, or regular vandalism. The remainder of the posts were closed in 1991 when the majority of the ROC was stood down following the break-up of the Communist Bloc. Many have been demolished or adapted to other uses but the majority still exist, although in a derelict condition. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 We could have had some serious fun if this was still there 12 13 14 15
  2. RAF Neatishead. Norfolk. June 2015

    Back in 1994 I visited this site when I was helping out with a open day when I was in the cadets. Many years later I was shocked when I found out that you could now get tours around the site and the bunker, so for the last 4 years I have been waiting to get onto one, but each time I have either been working or on holiday, but this time I got lucky and away we went to have some fun and games. The day was perfect as we met up with people who I had only ever chatted online with , so It was fab to finally put a face to the person. The only gripe of the day was the typical british weather, when we popped back out on ground level it was raining sideways, so that ruined our chances of a great group photo under the Radar. A little bit about the site and what it was used for. World War II In 1941, the Air Ministry surveyed a piece of land not far from the Broads at Horning in Norfolk with a view to establishing a site to host a brand new Air Defence station, a Ground Control Intercept station to be exact, from where Fighter Controllers, backed up by a wide range of support staff, could direct RAF fighters, day or night, to attack enemy aircraft from Germany as they launched raids against Military and Industrial targets in Norfolk as well as against the City of Norwich itself. In September 1941, two years into the Second World War, the first Secret radar system was installed at the new Radar Station of RAF Neatishead. Initially, the complement of forty airmen and airwomen was billeted at a local village and training began in this radical early warning system. At first, the station was home to temporary mobile Radars but it was soon to boast new, improved fixed Radar systems such as the Type 7 Search Radar and Type 13 Height-finding Radars. The hardened Control Room, the “Happidrome†was built and it is this very building which, today, forms part of the Museum. The Cold War At the end of World War II in 1945 the world entered seamlessly into a new conflict that was to last 45 years – the Cold War. As the defences for the United Kingdom were reorganised with fewer but more advanced Radar Stations to meet the new threat, RAF Neatishead continued to play an increasingly important role in the Air Defence of Great Britain. The station was established as a Sector Operations Centre (SOC) and continued to be used as such until 2004, by which time the only other SOC was in Buchan, Scotland. In 1954, the main Operations Centre was re- established deep underground in a vast two- storey hardened Bunker designed to withstand attack by Nuclear bombs. Between them, the Centres were responsible to NATO for the Air Defence of the UK, the Western North Sea (including the vital oil production platforms), and the Eastern North Atlantic well out past Ireland. To provide cover over such a vast area, a number of remote Radar sites were set up to feed information into the Sector Operations Centres, with Trimingham on the North Norfolk Coast being the Radar site still associated with RAF Neatishead today. By 2004, technology had improved to such an extent that all controlling functions could be undertaken from one Control Centre at RAF Boulmer in Northumberland. Neatishead Today Today, the aim of the base at Neatishead is to “to provide radar, ground-to-air radio and data links coverage as part of the UK Air Surveillance And Control System (ASACS), in support of national and NATO air defence; a task that has become increasingly important after the tragic events of 9/11.†Now called a Remote Radar Head, staff based here are responsible for both the Radar at Trimingham as well as equipment at a number of other sites in North Norfolk and at Neatishead itself. Information is sent by secure datalinks from the various systems to RAF Boulmer where the Controllers monitor UK airspace. The above information has been taken from the museum's website, and plenty more information can be found on that right here My photos from the 3 hours spent inside and down below 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  3. I have decided to place this report into others as it it a mix mash of a days trekking around East anglia. Separated I think they are a bit crap, but altogether it seems ok Went on one of those random drives that you do.. Just out and about looking for what cool stuff you can find. We had 2 things we wanted to see, one we could get in, but we would have got busted very quickly and then it would have been sealed up and nobody would be getting in for a while, so we gave it a miss, the 2nd we got seen by security while walking about. So it was now a case of lets just drive and see what we find.. It was mostly old houses that we found, and also some random fibre glass place, that looked smart from the outside, but megar trashed inside and not even worth getting the camera out. I came across this old house that was obviously part of a smallholding in the area, it was located just outside Ramsey Forty Foot, and we did notice that there was a good few of them along the road. 1 2 3 4 5 6 So next stop was RAF Upwood. One of those places that get done to death, and as I was in the area and had never been I thought I would go and have a little look around. This was one of those sites that just look the same as most others and after 30 mins of walking around you have shot most things, well until you come across the tanks. History Royal Air Force Upwood or more simply RAF Upwood is a former Royal Air Force station adjacent to the village of Upwood, Cambridgeshire, England in the United Kingdom. In the early 1930s, Britain realised its air defence capabilities were in urgent need of expansion. The major expansion of the Royal Air Force announced in 1934 resulted in many new airfields opening over the remainder of the decade. One of these was RAF Upwood. The old First World War airfield site was selected to be reactivated and expanded. The new station was designed to accommodate two medium bomber squadrons with room for a third. By 1936, construction had begun in earnest with two of five C-type hangars started. On 27 February 1937 the first flying unit arrived at Upwood in the form of No. 52 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Hinds. This unit was joined on 1 March 1937 by No. 63 Squadron and its Hawker Audaxes. During their time at Upwood, No 52 and 63 Squadrons became training units and took on both Fairey Battle and Avro Anson aircraft. In August and September 1939, the two squadrons were reassigned opening the field up to its new tenant, No. 90 Squadron flying Bristol Blenheims. With the end of the Second World War came a change in missions for the two squadrons at Upwood. No 156 Squadron was tasked with bringing food to Holland in support of Operation Manna then help repatriate former Prisoners of War as part of Operation Exodus. On 27 June 1945 the squadron was moved from Upwood. In place of the departing No 156 Squadron came No 105 Squadron, also flying Mosquitos. Both 105 and 139 Squadrons continued flying from RAF Upwood until February 1946. On 1 February 1946 No 139 Squadron moved to RAF Hemswell. On 4 February 1946 No. 105 Squadron was disbanded. Flying operations didn't cease for long. On 15 February 1946 Upwood became home to No. 102 Squadron flying Consolidated B-24 Liberator bombers. They spent the next several months bring British troops home from India. On 1 March 1946 the squadron was redesignated No 53. Squadron. The squadron was disbanded on 25 June 1946 soon after its last ferry flight. Two new squadrons of Lancasters called Upwood home starting on 29 July 1946 with arrival of No. 7 Squadron and No. 49 Squadron. On 4 November 1946 No. 148 Squadron and No. 214 Squadron were both reformed at Upwood. These new additions were part of a transition of Upwood from a training to attack mission. Both of the new squadrons also flew Lancasters. The four squadrons continued to fly their Lancasters until 1949 when they were transitioned to Avro Lincolns. Lincolns from 148 Squadron deployed to RAF Shallufa in January 1952 to reinforce British units in the Suez Canal Zone. This was in response to riots in Cairo and a generally unstable political situation in Egypt. During 1954 each of the four squadrons deployed to either RAF Tengah in Singapore in support of anti-communist operations in Malaysia or to Kenya in support of operations against the Mau Mau. Additionally, Lincolns from No 214 Squadron and No 7 Squadron took part in a secret mission in connection with nuclear trials conducted near Woomera, Australia. During this time a film production company produced a war time film play called Appointment in London. The company used three Lancasters in making the film but the background shots are of the four Squadrons of Lincolns and the film uses much of the airfield and buildings in its production showing a good view of Upwood at that time On 31 December 1954 Upwood lost one of its four flying units when No. 214 Squadron disbanded. This unit was replaced on 22 May 1955 when No. 18 Squadron moved to Upwood from RAF Scampton. This squadron brought something completely new to the base in the form of their English Electric Canberra jet bombers. This was followed by more Canberras when No. 61 Squadron moved in from RAF Wittering on 3 July 1955. Two more Lincoln squadrons disbanded on 1 August, 49 and 148. This was followed by the disbanding of the last Lincoln squadron, No. 7, on 1 January 1956. These were replaced throughout 1956 by more Canberra units; No. 50 Squadron on 9 January, No. 35 Squadron on 16 July and No. 40 Squadron on 1 November. However, this last squadron was disbanded on 15 December 1956. Eight Canberras B2 each from Nos. 7, 18,35,50 and 61 Squadron flew to Cyprus on 19 October in support of Operation Alacrity. Over four days in early November, these aircraft took part in raids on various targets in Egypt. This was the first combat operations by Upwood aircraft since the Second World War. The 32 planes returned to Upwood just in time for Christmas, arriving home on 24 December 1956. The next two years saw a series of unit disbandments and arrivals culminating in a slow winding down of flying operations at Upwood. On 1 February 1957, No. 18 Squadron was disbanded. On 31 March 1958 No. 61 Squadron disbanded. No. 542 Squadron arrived on 17 July along with No. 76 Squadron. No 542 Squadron was renamed to No. 21 Squadron on 1 October. The year 1959 saw the disbanding of No. 21 Squadron (15 January) and No. 50 Squadron (1 October). On 31 December 1960 No. 76 Squadron disbanded. The final flying unit No. 35 Squadron was disbanded on 11 September 1961. With the disbanding of No. 35 Squadron Upwood was transferred to RAF Strike Command who quickly set about transforming the airfield into a hub of various support activities. Over the next several months the station became home to No 4 Ground Radio Servicing Section, Radio Technical Publications Squadron, the Aeromedical Training Centre, the Joint School of Photographic Interpretation and three squadrons of HQ No 33 Field Wing, RAF Regiment. The different units had barely settled in when change came again. In early 1963 the RAF Regiment units departed. In 1964 the other units left as well, leaving Upwood with only a token care-taker staff. In March 1964, 22 Group of Technical Training Command arrived and set up their School of Management and Work Study. July saw the arrival of the School of Education and the RAF Central Library, followed in September by the School of Administration. Upwood was again becoming focused on training. Later training units included the Equipment Officers Training Centre and the Air Cadet Training Centre. These various training activities lasted, in one form or another, until the late 1970s. By 1981, the station was again almost dormant. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Then it was time to start making the drive home, but we decided to stop of at a old green grocers on the Norfolk suffolk borders to have a look. It was trashed, Signs of a fire, dodgy roofs and full of junk, so after salvaging a few images we decided to call it a day and head home. 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
  4. While in the area we popped into this place, not too much left and no access to the underground but a good little wander. History Copenacre Quarry was purchased by the MOD in 1940 and, following an urgent request for underground storage in 1941, made available to the Navy. The estimated cost to convert the quarry was £192,500, but the Navy demanded the best of everything and within weeks costs had exceeded the agreed budget. In 1972 it was announced that Copenacre was to close, but with a staff of 1,700 this raised concerns. Following a Public Enquiry the depot was retained indefinitely. However, Copenacre closed in 1995 and was sold off in 1997. Some pics Thanks for looking
  5. Another one crossed off the list...! I decided to head out here early doors this morning, which meant a nice blast out on the bike. Access wasn't too difficult... especially for an overweight, middle-aged loser and I didn't see another soul all morning (except some fella on the outside of the fence walking his hound, giving me a discerning look). Here's a bit of the history, which ashamedly has been plagiarised from a source on t'internet because I haven't got much time to research and put something in my own words... something I always endeavour to try and do. The story of gunpowder production at Waltham Abbey begins with a fulling mill for cloth production; originally set up by the monks of the Abbey on the Millhead Stream, an engineered water course tapping the waters of the River Lea. Mills were adaptable and in the early 17th century it was converted to an 'Oyle Mill', i.e. for producing vegetable oils. In the Second Dutch War gunpowder supply shortages were encountered and the oil mill was converted to gunpowder production, possibly in response to this. In 1665 it was acquired by Ralph Hudson using saltpetre made in Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire. The Hudson family sold out to William Walton at the end of the 17th century, starting a family connection lasting almost a hundred years. The enterprise was successful under the Walton's tenure and the Mills expanded up the Millhead Stream as additional production facilities were added; the material progressing from one building to another as it passed through the various processes. The Waltham Abbey Mills were one of the first examples in the 18th century of an industrialised factory system, not often recognised. In the 1780s there was fresh concern over security, quality and economy of supply. The deputy comptroller of the Royal Laboratory at Woolwich, Major, later Lieutenant General, Sir William Congreve advocated that the Waltham Abbey Mills should be purchased by the Crown to ensure secure supplies and to establish what would now be called a centre of excellence for development of manufacturing processes and to establish quality and cost standards by which private contractors could be judged. In October 1787 the Crown purchased the mills from John Walton for £10,000, starting a 204 year ownership. Congreve was a man of immense drive and vision, a pioneer of careful management, quality control and the application of the scientific method. Under his regime manufacture moved from what had been a black art to, in the context of its day, an advanced technology. The distinguished engineer John Rennie coined the phrase ‘The Old Establishment’ in his 1806 report on the Royal Gun Powder Factory. The term refers to the gunpowder mills when they were still privately owned, before they were acquired by The Crown in 1787. Reflecting this, the mills were able to respond successfully in volume and quality to the massive increases in demand which arose over the period of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars from 1789, culminating in the victory at Waterloo in 1815. In the years following Waterloo the Mills entered a period of quiet with a steep decline in staff numbers and production levels. However there was a steady advance in machinery and process development. The quiet was not to last. Conflict broke out in 1854 with the Crimean War with Russia, followed by the Indian Mutiny and a succession of colonial conflicts followed, culminating in the Boer War of 1899 - 1902. All of this provided the impulse for further development. Whilst the mills' function was to provide gunpowder for military use, either as a propellant for use in guns, or as a military explosive for demolition, etc., improvements effected there were a strong influence on private industry producing for civil activity - construction, mining, quarrying, tunneling, railway building etc. which created a massive demand for gunpowder in the 19th century. World War I 1914 - 1918 brought a huge upsurge in demand. Staff numbers increased by around 3,000 to a total of 6,230. The 3,000 additional workers were largely female, recruited from the surrounding area, and this was a significant social phenomenon. After WWI there was another period of quiet before anxieties about the future surfaced again. It was decided that production at Waltham Abbey would be gradually transferred to the west of the country, safer from air attack from Europe. However, in the meantime, production continued and crucial development work was carried out on TNT production and on the new explosive RDX. During WWII, Waltham Abbey remained an important cordite production unit and for the first two years of the war was the sole producer of RDX. RDX is one component of torpex, the explosive that was used in the Bouncing Bomb. Total transfer of RDX production to the west of England, to ROF Bridgwater; and dispersal of cordite production to new propellant factories located: in the west of Scotland, three co-located factories at ROF Bishopton, to Wales, ROF Wrexham, and to the North East, ROF Ranskill, was achieved by 1943. Many Waltham Abbey staff played a vital role in developing the new Explosive Royal Ordnance Factories, training staff and superintending production. The Royal Gunpowder Mills finally closed on 28 July 1945.[1] In 1945 the establishment re-opened as a research centre known as The Explosives Research and Development Establishment, or ERDE. In 1977 it became the Propellants, Explosives and Rocket Motor Establishment, Waltham Abbey, or PERME Waltham Abbey. As a research centre Waltham Abbey was responsible for military propellant and high explosives and expanded into the increasingly significant field of rocket propellants, solid and liquid and a range of specialised applications, e.g. 'snifters' for altering space vehicles direction when in flight, cartridges for firing aircraft ejector seats, engine and generator starter cartridges - these applications have been called 'a measured strong shove'. In 1984 the South site and the Lower Island works were handed over to Royal Ordnance Plc immediately prior to its privatisation. The North side however remained in Ministry of Defence control as a research centre; becoming part of the Royal Armament Research and Development Establishment. After various reorganisations of Governmental research, the research centre finally closed in 1991, bringing to an end 300 years of explosives production and research. I actually took around 200 photo's and probably didn't see half of the place so perhaps another visit will be on the cards soon. This will probably be a bit image-heavy so apologies for that but I have narrowed it down a lot. Look out for the freaky pictures... and you'll probably gather from this, and my previous reports, I'm a bit partial to mono!!! That'll do for now... I know the place has been doen before but I hope these images provide something a little different? Thanks for looking guys and as always... feel free to comment/criticise. Feedback is always gratefully received! Keep safe, y'all... ...u)>.<(n
  6. Vistied here with Seeker1701. Picked him up on a very very wet morning to recce another site which was a no go so we decided to head to this one. upon arrival all seemed well and we entered the site. I was amazed at how much stuff was left behind and this was just the first building we entered. we continued our explore and by this time the rain has well and truly stopped. in one of the rooms we found a map of the airfield and using google maps worked out where we were on it. we suggested to head for the bomb storage areas but go via the control tower. this is where we ran into a spot of bother. walking to the tower we noticed a group of people in camouflage walking around the top of the tower. as we got closer we noticed some vehicles which we headed over to. as we were looking at them a rather befuddled army sergeant walked over to us and challenged us. we explained who we were and were asked to leave the area as we had just walked straight in to the middle of a military training exercise which had the british army and U.S air force involved. it was at this point our main explore was over but we continued to explore the various old MOD buildings dotted about the site outside the perimeter fence. so a bit of history and a link to more This is just small piece about the start of RAF Sculthorpe. RAF Sculthorpe was built as the second satellite airfield of RAF West Raynham a few miles to the south, the first being RAF Great Massingham. Work was begun in the spring of 1942 and the airfield was laid out as a standard RAF heavy bomber airfield with concrete runways, dispersals site, mess facilities and accommodation. Much of the construction work was completed by Irish labour working for the construction company Bovis. And the link to the rest of the history http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Sculthorpe And now the pics Thanks For Looking Hope You Enjoyed It
  7. UK MOD Buildings - Dover - Kent - 2008

    explored with solar p dont no anything about these but solar p said they were to do with the mod severly trashed and dangerous bit of a boring one really
  8. Had some time to kill this morning so I decided to go for a walk around the MOD training area at Reinden Woods. Part of the East Kent Dry training area acquired by the MOD in 1938 for training leading up to WW2. This place is littered with open brick bunker type things I found at least 10 good ones and loads that had been demolished. I also found 4 of these brick base with concrete roof bunkers, with a door at each end. There is also a large building with no windows apart from the two front slots, maybe it was some kind of power plant as it has two chimneys at one end. There is a steel door each end, unfortunately padlocked. Front: Rear / chimney: The bogs and a funny little hut in a clearing. I think there is a lot more to be found in there, a woman who scared the crap out of me by asking what I was taking photos of while I was engrossed, said that there was at least 1 large underground tunnel that her dog found about 10 years ago but could not remember where it was apart from it was on the north side of the woods and the entrance was 3 or 4 ft tall and on a hill side. She said she was in there 10 mins looking for her dog there was a single long tunnel with at least 8 rooms off of it
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