Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Dubbed Navigator

      Style   11/21/2017

      Hello - we are pleased to announce that there is now a light version of the style. If you wish to use it, go to the bottom left of the site where there is an option to change it 

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'norfolk'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 24 results

  1. Oakwood Farm The Explore A farm in Norfolk with a blue toilet which I liked. Good quality mahogany seat which was a bit dusty and the flush was defective. Toilet roll was scratchy on the anus area and dusty too. A farmer and his wife and possibly kids lived here at some point in the past. My guess is the farmer liked cars. There were lots of things to photograph here and from my 1% memory of this 'explore' that room with the wardrobe was pitch black and I called my camera lots of names that day, when in reality it was my inability to use it correctly that was the problem. And I had a poo there, while @Urbexbandoned laughed and photographed me, but that's the norm for pretty much every time we're out exploring. The History A farm in Norfolk where nobody lives anymore. The whole extended family died and it became a derp. The Pictures 1. 2. Vaseline - Empty... 3. Something for the bum grapes 4. 5. The dark room which was a twat to photograph.. 6. 7. "with 3 doors!" 8. 9. There was pretty much nothing in this room apart from this old tea box. 10. 11. Impactual eeriebex photo showing some kind of past.. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Thanks for having a look and feedback always appreciated
  2. RAF West Raynham The Explore A bit of a flying visit this one as we had other things to check out deeper into Norfolk that day and I was really only mainly interested in the peely action going on in the foyer to the Junior Ranks Mess and a few other bits and bobs. I might jump on the Errbex bus sometime in the future and mooch around the other bits but mostly likely i won't. Visited with @Urbexbandoned and thanks for the few tips beforehand from @Mikeymutt. The History (stolen as always) The airfield opened during May 1939 and was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with the loss of 86 aircraft. The station closed in 1994, though the Ministry of Defence (MoD) retained it as a strategic reserve. Having laid derelict since closure, the MoD elected in 2004 that it was surplus to requirements, and the site was sold in 2006 to the Welbeck Estate Group who sold the entire site in October 2007.The airfield opened during May 1939 and was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with the loss of 86 aircraft. The station closed in 1994, though the Ministry of Defence (MoD) retained it as a strategic reserve. Having laid derelict since closure, the MoD elected in 2004 that it was surplus to requirements, and the site was sold in 2006 to the Welbeck Estate Group who sold the entire site in October 2007. Built between 1938 and 1939, RAF West Raynham was an expansion scheme airfield. The grass landing area was aligned roughly north-east to south-west. The main camp, with housing and headquarters, was located immediately west of the landing area. To the south-east were bomb stores. The airfield was originally equipped with a Watch Office with Tower (Fort Type), of pattern 207/36 (made from concrete), although the tower was later removed and new control room built to pattern 4698/43. Later in the war the station was provided with a "Control Tower for Very Heavy Bomber Stations" to pattern 294/45, one of only four such towers to be built. The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6/7. Small industrial building 8. Officer's Mess 9. 10. 11. 12. The Bar.. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18/19. 20. 21. 22. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  3. I decided to have a swing by here as it had been a while... In fact a long long time as I hate the place as it was photos I took here that when I plugged the camera into the computer it killed the computer along with a few years of family, holiday and exploring pictures and it was long before I knew how important it was to back up your files etc etc etc. I had been past it a good few times while working and knew exactly what was going on with the demo of the site. I also failed another time to get in but was not fussed as I knew I had seen the good bits and they were slowly vanishing. But I went out with the camera with clareexplores to have a little look at what was left now that the builders have gone...... Well there is not much too see now.. A long corridor with a few rooms and now way to access the other floors and the morgue is all that remains. History The Norfolk Lunatic Asylum was situated in Yarmouth Road, Thorpe St Andrew near Norwich. Opened in April 1814 and closed in 1998 and slowly bit by bit the site has been turned into completely over priced houses on one side of the road and over the other the old tower now just sits all on its own 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  4. The Xmas holidays made for some free time and the opportunity for me to explore. So I arranged a whole day out with my buddys and Storm LSF who was coming out with us for the 1st time.. So the Alarm goes of at 2:30am and I check the phone and 2 of the party have become lightweights We arrive at the south coast at 7am and its not good from the start. Fail, fail, and busted by a rather nice security guard. So it is onto our last stop of the day as it is now the afternoon and decided we would try this... With it being busy near the front doors we decided to head round the back and tackle the muddy and waterlogged fields and get in that way..... Once we had squeezed in (due to too much xmas choc I guess) it was time to grab a load of photos and then make a quick exit and get home for more xmas Choccys. And then as we are walking away we hear some shouting from the other side of the water from some folk, could not work out if it was get out of there or how did you get in lol, but we just stomped of into the sunset and headed home History Pinched from kkj The Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded c.1933 to exploit a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay to the south of the Surrey village of Capel. Although the outbreak of war in 1939 brought some demand for bricks to help with the war effort, there was apparently little need for the high-grade hollow ceramic blocks which were Clockhouse's main product and conscription meant that there was also a severe shortage of labour. By 1941, the Company was in liquidation and sold the majority of its share capital to the London Brick Company (LBC) to avoid closing the works. In 1945, the Company was wound up for good and the works were acquired by the LBC. Under LBC, production was substantially increased, aided by the 1950s housing boom and in the 1960s the works was rebuilt to cope with ever increasing demand. The global financial crisis of 2008 hit the building materials industry hard: a sudden slump in housing prices meant that house-building ground almost to a halt and demand for bricks plummeted. In March 2009, a 'phased closure programme' which began later that month and led to the loss of 61 jobs with indication that there was no intention to re-activate the brickworks or extract clay from the adjacent pits. Since closure, Clockhouse Brickworks has been in limbo, slowly being stripped of anything valuable while a lengthy audit determines the planning conditions surrounding re-use of the site. Plans for an incinerator ('energy from waste facility') on the site, bitterly opposed by local residents, were thrown out by a High Court Judgment in 2009 and the future of the site is now uncertain. 1 2 3 4 5 6 :pThis is what I wanted to see here 7 35mm 8 85mm 9 17mm 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And a few random pics from some place we got busted at during the day. Apparently we set of a PIR/alarm as we walked in 1 2
  5. This was a day a out that I had been looking forward to since we planned it all. Nice day out with mates visiting a nature reserve and getting a bit of fresh air too.. The plan was to see all the site and sneak into the pergolas as they said we could get in close to them but we were just not meant to go in....Well que 3 hours later when we are stood over 700mt away from them and now have a angry trust volunteer and a land rover patrolling the site making sure we go nowhere near them we knew it was just going to end up with some very pissed off people. All the way back to the Ferry we got followed... Something tells me they did not trust us at all I get home later than night to find out my mate has already emailed the national trust to have a moan about how annoying the staff are and that by charging and extra £70 p/p that they do for the photography tours it will not make the pergolas suddenly become 'safe' so you can take people into see them. History Atomic Weapons Research Establishment The 1950s saw the construction of specialised facilities to exploit new post-war technologies such as nuclear power. AWRE Orfordness was one of only a few sites in the UK, and indeed the world, where purpose-built facilities were created for testing the components of nuclear weapons. At the height of the Cold War AWRE and the Royal Aircraft Establishment used Orford Ness for developmental work on the atomic bomb. Initial work on the atomic bomb concentrated on recording the flight of the weapon and monitoring the electronics within it during flight, but much of the work involved environmental testing, which in itself was being developed and advanced. Although built and developed specifically for the testing of nuclear weapons, by the 1960s efforts were being made to find commercial markets for the site's capabilities. Between 1953 and 1966 the six large test cells and most of the other buildings on the shingle around them were built to carry out environmental tests on the atomic bomb. These tests were designed to mimic the rigours to which a weapon might be subjected before detonation, and included vibration, extremes of temperature, shocks and G forces. Although no nuclear material was said to be involved, the high explosive initiator was present and a test failure might have resulted in a catastrophic explosion. For this reason the tests were controlled remotely and the huge labs were designed to absorb and dissipate an explosion in the event of an accident. Pagodas Perhaps the most impressive buildings from this period are two of the test labs - the so-called 'Pagodas' - which have become such well-known landmarks on this part of the coast. The work was secret although details of Orford Ness' involvement with the research and development of the British atomic bomb may become more available over the next decades and may illustrate the priority and significance this project had to the government in the post-war years. Amongst the atomic experimental sites Orford Ness is perhaps the most architecturally dramatic and remains the only one allowing general public access at the present time. The AWRE ceased work on the site in 1971. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 So after we had finished being stalked around the island and ticked that one of the list we decided to head back to Bawdsey as 2 folks we were with had not been before for some odd reason, and it was also cool to have a look and see how trashed it was now.... And it is sad to say that it is now that trashed in the Bunker I did not even bother to get the camera out, in fact I do not think that anybody did... The best shots for me were to be had above ground.. I was gutted to see that somebody had been into the police dog room and nicked, and by nicked I mean nicked the whole wall that had the snoopy art work on it History In 1935 Bawdsey Manor Estate in Suffolk was selected as the site for a new research station for the development of radio direction finding and the Manor House, close to Bawdsey Quay was taken over for this purpose. Following this research, the first Chain Home radar station was developed on the site being handed over to the RAF in May 1937, two years later 15 Chain Home stations were available for use around the coast. Bawdsey continued in the forefront of the expansion of the radar network with an AMES Type 2 Chain Home Low on a 200 foot platform on the southern (No 4 of 4) transmitter mast. (each mast was 350' high). Towards the end of 1941 Coastal Defence Radar was established making Bawdsey the only site in the UK with three types of radar (CH, CHL and CD) in operation. By August 1943 Coastal Defence was changed to an AMES Type 55 Chain Home Extra Low (CHEL), again this was mounted on a 200 foot platform on the northern (No 1) transmitter mast. Bawdsey is listed as being operational with both CH and CHEL in 1948. In 1950, the station was chosen to participate in the ROTOR programme which should have been operational by January 1952. Work on the R3 two level underground control centre at the northern end of the site began late in 1950. Bawdsey was designated a GCI/E site utilising 1 Type 7 Mk3 on an R7 building remotely sited on Alderton Marshes, 2km north east of the site. The following radars were planned for the 'A' site: 1 Remote Type 7 Mk 3 with T79 IFF 3 Type 13 mounted on 9' high concrete plinths 2 Type 13 mounted on 12' high concrete plinths 1 Type 13 on a 25' mounted on a 25' gantry (4 of the above are Mk 6 with IFF the other 2 are Mk 7 without IFF) 1 Type 14 Mk 8 mounted on a 9' high concrete plinth 1 Type 14 Mk 9 mounted on a 25' gantry 1 Type 54 Mk 3 mounted on a 200' tower There was a transmitter and receiver site at Shottisham and married quarters in Alderton village. In February 1953 an American (Bendix enginers supervised these UK installations) AN/FPS-3 'search' radar was installed using an air ministry wooden hut as the R3 bunker was not yet complete. The new control centre wasn't ready until 1954 although the station was already operational. In July of that year links were established between the UK and French reporting systems allowing two way extension of radar cover over Europe. Bawdsey was manned by 144 Signals Unit from 11 Group and together with 6 other station in the Easter Sector it offered cover from 30 minutes before dawn to 30 minutes after sunset; there was no night cover. Type 80 radar at Bawdsey In 1958 an AMES Type 80 Mk 3 (Green Garlic) was installed together with 2 AN/FPS-6 US made 'Height Finding' radars. The AN/FPS-3 was retained as a standby as was the Remote Type 7 on Alderton Marshes. In October 1962 the 1st AMES Type 84 L Band radar came on line. In January 1963 Bloodhound SAGW (Surface to air guided weapons) were regrouped under Master Radar Station status at Bawdsey and Patrington but in June 1964 Bawdsey lost its Master Radar station Status and became a satellite to Neatishead. This status was regained in February 1966 following the disastrous fire in the R3 control centre at Neatishead. By 1972 the Type 54 had been removed and a reflector for a microwave link was attached to the tower. The microwave link brought live radar feed from the Type 84 and Type 85 radar's at RAF Neatishead. In 1974 Neatishead resumed Master Radar Station status from Bawdsey on the completion of the installation of the Standby Early Warning & Control System (SLEWC). The following March Bawdsey closed and was placed on care and maintenance. In 1977 theROTOR period plinths, Type 80 modulator building and 200' Type 54 tower were demolished. In August 1979 Bawdsey reopened as a Bloodhound Mk2 surface to air missile (SAM) site operated by C flight of No 85 Squadron. It was divided into 2 missile sections, each equipped with 6 launchers and a Type 87 fire control radar. The Type 84 modulator building (R17) was retained as a crew room and store for Bloodhound armament handling flight. A new control room was established in the R3 bunker to administer the missile control site. The new storage sheds and storage bays and protective wall are all of Bloodhound origin. From 1984 - 85 Strike Command's (UKAIR) Interim Alternative War HQ was established in the R3 operations block while a new Strike Command Bunker was being built at High Wycombe, during the construction period the bunker at Bawdsey was given a short new lease of life. The R3 was given a refit and much new (temporary) equipment was installed. At this time the central operations room was altered and a new control cabin installed above. When the new bunker at High Wycombe was ready the team pulled out of Bawdsey, their equipment was stripped and the bunker was abandoned. In 1988 two Type 87 radar heads were removed and replaced by 2 Type 86 Radar Caravans mounted on platforms on top of the Type 87 plinths. On 31st May 1990 the Bloodhound force ceased operations and in June all the missiles were withdrawn to RAF West Raynham. The RAF Ensign was lowered for the last time on the 25th March 1991 and the station closed on the 31st March. 14 15 16 17
  6. This was another of those fab days out, Just driving around and checking out stuff I had been wanting to see for a while that had popped up online. So myself Zyge, littlebear and Spark headed out for the day to avoid massive nettles and horsefly bites..... Something that I did not manage all to well 1st stop was a area called Hillbilly farm, this was linked to RAF Fersfield and the land incorporates some of the old nissen huts and a few other out buildings as well. Inside some of these buildings you will see there are all sorts of vehicles and other bits of junk, most of what nature has now reclaimed. There is not a lot of history on the farm itself other than the farmer did not want to sell it off as he was worried about being ripped of, how true this is I am not sure, but the airfield history I feel is important as most of what there is to see incorporates the building that are there. The runway is now gone as are all airfield building that we looked for, but you can still drive around the taxi way if you wish Built in 1943/1944, the airfield was originally a satellite of RAF Knettishall. It was constructed to Class A bomber specifications, with a main 6,000 ft (1,800 m) runway (08/26), and two secondary runways (02/20, 14/32) of 4,200 ft (1,300 m). Accommodation for about 2,000 personnel were in Nissen huts along with an operations block and two T-2 hangars. The facility was originally named Winfarthing when it was allocated to the United States Army Air Forces in 1942. Assigned to the VIII Bomber Command, it was renamed Fersfield when used by the Americans. Winfarthing was assigned USAAF station number 140; Fersfield was reassigned 554. Not used by the USAAF, it was transferred to the United States Navy for operational use. The airfield is most notable as the operational airfield for Operation Aphrodite, a secret plan for remote controlled Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers (redesignated as BQ-7s) to be used against German V-1 flying bomb sites, submarine pens, or deep fortifications that had resisted conventional bombing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  7. RAF Neatishead. Norfolk. June 2015

    Back in 1994 I visited this site when I was helping out with a open day when I was in the cadets. Many years later I was shocked when I found out that you could now get tours around the site and the bunker, so for the last 4 years I have been waiting to get onto one, but each time I have either been working or on holiday, but this time I got lucky and away we went to have some fun and games. The day was perfect as we met up with people who I had only ever chatted online with , so It was fab to finally put a face to the person. The only gripe of the day was the typical british weather, when we popped back out on ground level it was raining sideways, so that ruined our chances of a great group photo under the Radar. A little bit about the site and what it was used for. World War II In 1941, the Air Ministry surveyed a piece of land not far from the Broads at Horning in Norfolk with a view to establishing a site to host a brand new Air Defence station, a Ground Control Intercept station to be exact, from where Fighter Controllers, backed up by a wide range of support staff, could direct RAF fighters, day or night, to attack enemy aircraft from Germany as they launched raids against Military and Industrial targets in Norfolk as well as against the City of Norwich itself. In September 1941, two years into the Second World War, the first Secret radar system was installed at the new Radar Station of RAF Neatishead. Initially, the complement of forty airmen and airwomen was billeted at a local village and training began in this radical early warning system. At first, the station was home to temporary mobile Radars but it was soon to boast new, improved fixed Radar systems such as the Type 7 Search Radar and Type 13 Height-finding Radars. The hardened Control Room, the “Happidrome†was built and it is this very building which, today, forms part of the Museum. The Cold War At the end of World War II in 1945 the world entered seamlessly into a new conflict that was to last 45 years – the Cold War. As the defences for the United Kingdom were reorganised with fewer but more advanced Radar Stations to meet the new threat, RAF Neatishead continued to play an increasingly important role in the Air Defence of Great Britain. The station was established as a Sector Operations Centre (SOC) and continued to be used as such until 2004, by which time the only other SOC was in Buchan, Scotland. In 1954, the main Operations Centre was re- established deep underground in a vast two- storey hardened Bunker designed to withstand attack by Nuclear bombs. Between them, the Centres were responsible to NATO for the Air Defence of the UK, the Western North Sea (including the vital oil production platforms), and the Eastern North Atlantic well out past Ireland. To provide cover over such a vast area, a number of remote Radar sites were set up to feed information into the Sector Operations Centres, with Trimingham on the North Norfolk Coast being the Radar site still associated with RAF Neatishead today. By 2004, technology had improved to such an extent that all controlling functions could be undertaken from one Control Centre at RAF Boulmer in Northumberland. Neatishead Today Today, the aim of the base at Neatishead is to “to provide radar, ground-to-air radio and data links coverage as part of the UK Air Surveillance And Control System (ASACS), in support of national and NATO air defence; a task that has become increasingly important after the tragic events of 9/11.†Now called a Remote Radar Head, staff based here are responsible for both the Radar at Trimingham as well as equipment at a number of other sites in North Norfolk and at Neatishead itself. Information is sent by secure datalinks from the various systems to RAF Boulmer where the Controllers monitor UK airspace. The above information has been taken from the museum's website, and plenty more information can be found on that right here My photos from the 3 hours spent inside and down below 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  8. When the Steel mill closed in 2012 I knew there and then that I wanted to get inside it and check it out. But little did I know that due to my lazy ass and work schedule it would be 2 years later when I would walk in the door and my jaw would drop on the floor in pure amazement of the scale of the site. How had I managed to neglect this big industrial monster that was only a short drive away from Norfolk. So nice one to Wevsky for the map 2 years ago lol When we were walking around it was just amazing that the amount of dust was there,the wind was howling through the site and the sun beaming in through every available nook and cranny creating some of the best light beams I have ever seen. After around 4 hours of covering half of the ground floor and the 1stfloor we decided that we would head off to our second location and make sure that we came back soon for a re-visit. History In January 2012 the site all of a sudden shut with the loss of 350 Jobs. The site had previously been sold to Al-Tuwairqi Group (ATG) in 2002 when its previous owners went into liquidation. But obviously things did not improve. There are now rumours in the local press that part of the site could open as a rolling mill by the summer of 2015 creating 120 jobs. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  9. Well this was my 1st explore of 2015, and as luck would have it not our planned 1st explore We had intended to pop to the recently closed coke works just up the road in Barnsley, but this was a hive of activity, and not from the explorer buses turning up, but the decommissioning team already flat out and on the case So after a nearly 4 hour drive, and it just starting to rain as we got there, we decided to tick of a few things on the overdue to do list.... Off to George Barnsley's it was to be after about a few secs of deciding.. So 30 mins later and were parked up outside and making our way inside.. I had seen reports on-line, but for some reason it had a lot more to offer than I realised. Mates had been saying for a long time that it would be right up my street, and oh boy they were right. Plenty of shots to have a play with both the wide angel and 50mm and I was in heaven for the morning we spent inside. On the way out a random encounter with some bloke on his phone as we hopped over the wall was rather odd, as he gave each of us the good morning too ya nod, so after all this fun it was time to jump back into the motor and head off to the nearest Macdonalds covered and smelling of pigeon poop. History George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. Now for photos 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
  10. Intro I was up Norfolk/Suffolk for a few days and had a few visits planned, nothing went as it should and ended up feeling a bit rubbish. I needed somewhere I could sit on top of and relax for a bit. I found this and was incredibly glad I did. Sometimes you don't need to travel far to find what you're looking for. All fisheye, a bit gritty and a bit crap, but it was fun. Enjoy. History, present and future Then it was refurbished... ...Sort of http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/railway_bridge_footpath_reopens_as_630_000_refurbishment_of_vauxhall_bridge_in_great_yarmouth_is_completed_1_2819542 £630,000 and they only half finished it? The rotting side is slowly falling into further disrepair and you get the feeling it's loosing hope, It shouldn't be red, it never was originally and it doesn't look original or as characteristic as the black side. Shame, Hopefully it'll all be done up and they'll finish the job before it's too far gone falls into the Yare. The visit and pictures So it was one of those weeks Had a crappy few visits that didn't go as planned and didn't quite feel too brilliant I'd had a day of fails and then missed the train I was intending to catch After many wanders I'd found my way back and took a rest, I couldn't relax and needed to get up somewhere Google came to the rescue and then there I was I needed to get to this, at least do something and then there I was, in the end the trip wasn't wasted It had a lot of character and it was a great night, dark skies highlighted with clouds and a pretty strong wind blew the bridge sideways I was in and it felt relaxed, again you sit up somewhere and it's all the same, big rush, then you chill at the top, the pictures are always different but every time you climb down, you want to be back up again The thing swayed like anything but that added to it It had character and for some reason it just felt good to be there It wasn't even high, it was just fun, like a climbing frame that had been neglected, waiting for some numpty like me to sit on it Even better, the public wandered below me oblivious, to be fair, I was oblivious to them It was just silent The fresh air cleared my head but the wind was as if you were even higher up I clambered down and casually crossed back over on the public section right passed the locals Then I got to the point where you look back for one more look and then onto the next No tripod, No light but luckily I had a bit of time and bridge The images don't show it as it's best but that's not the reason I climbed it It was fun And it was windy I hope you enjoyed! Cheers
  11. I was unsure if I was to post this one or not as it is a bit trashed, but thought I would as it is full of nice bits and bobs and has stood the test of time, so I Visited here with my mate after we had been checking out a few old Gun placements along the coast and decided to pop in and have a look. He said the elements have started to destroy it all since the start of the year. You could see just how bad the rot was and that it wont be long till it is gone. Such a shame really as it has some interesting little bits and bobs scattered all around. As for the history of the place I could not see anything on-line about it, but it would be apparent that it was a Holiday cottage, and has not been in use for a long long time. From the Chalet From the old train Carriage. The car park looks rather cool as well.
  12. Decided to pop back and have a little look about, it had been 14 months since I had last gone and to be honest not much has changed, a few more broken windows, more chalets are now sealed up properly, and somebody has thrown the medics storage cupboard in the pool. Last time I visited I shot on a eos 5 film camera with Velvia 50 film and a 50mm f/1.4 usm lens.... This time I shot with a 6d and a Canon 17-40mm f/4 L so got something a little different this time. Bit of History and what's going on from the local rag The 2,440-capacity camp in Hemsby has been empty since 2008 when Pontin’s closed it “following a period of sustained operating lossesâ€Â. Grass was overgrown , it was full of weeds and a number of break-ins have been reported this year. But following negotiations between Great Yarmouth Borough Council and the property agent for the site it has been tidied up. After receiving complaints from the public about the condition of the privately-owned site, the borough council asked for improvements to the former Pontins site, which closed in recent years. Now this gateway site, in Beach Road, has been spruced up at the instruction of Northern Trust, the site’s agent, following discussions with the authority. The council did not pay for any of the work. If this informal agreement had not been reached, the borough had the option to serve a legal notice ordering the responsible party to undertake the work by a certain date, or else face criminal prosecution. In October this year, the borough council used these legal powers to press for improvements to Vauxhall House, next to the railway station, which must be upgraded by January 20, 2014. The agreement over the Pontins site required the boarded-up windows to be painted white, the grass, weeds and low-lying vegetation to be cut to ground level, and the hedge along Back Market Lane to be cut. This was completed during November. Cllr Trevor Wainwright, the leader of Great Yarmouth Borough Council, said: “The former Pontins site is a prominent property, visible on the main route through Hemsby, so its appearance influences how residents and visitors feel about the borough. “This site has been a persistent cause of public concern since it was vacated. And although there’s been some minimal maintenance, these negotiations have secured a more comprehensive schedule of works which should alleviate the visual harm. “Discussions are ongoing to agree a long-term viable use for the site, but in the meantime the borough council will work with the agent to ensure it does not fall below our standards.†The former Pontins site is 8.877 hectares (21.94 acres), with an extensive road frontage. The central leisure and entertainment facilities extend overall to approximately 6,785 sq m (73,033 sq ft). Chalet accommodation for 2,440 people is provided within 512 chalets. - See more at: http://www.greatyarmouthmercury.co.uk/news/former_hemsby_pontins_holiday_camp_is_tidied_up_1_3076290#sthash.zCSCJXtZ.dpuf
  13. This is a random old place, from what we have found out while bumping into various new owners of the land, there used to be a slaughter house on the land for many many years, then some sort of a collection of motor vehicles has happened over the many many years.. With a mass variety of things such as vans, cars, fire engines, aircraft parts, buses, baths and even the odd toilet, kitchen sinks and a big huge bull. We found out that the lady that owned the site had died a few years ago, and the 5 daughters had inherited the land, their husbands were now slowly weighting in all the vehicles and clearing the land of the 3500 vehicles that nature was slowly starting to reclaim.. We had also found snippets in local newspaper from the 1980's selling some of the vehicles off. It is such a shame to see them all just get dragged about by diggers, loaded into a dumper lorry and crushed, as it is a cool site, but over the last yea, the place has now become more and more noticeably bare we visited this time just so myself and my fiend could check it out for a model shoot, and so I could have a play with the new canon 17-40mm L f/4 lens. So these shots are all handheld and either with that lens or the Canon 50mm f/1.4
  14. been exploring a while now but never bothered to register some of you will know me via facebook (bensmithUE) is there a guide how to put pictures up i cant find one thanks
  15. Time to jump on the tourist bus and we decided to organise a road trip with a load of mates including atomic, zyge, magpie tommy, spark and sbmkIII, for some it was the 1st time we had met for most it was exactly 1 year to the day since our 1st escape from Norfolk road trip. Part of my reasoning for going was to document this explore as my tutors wanted to see me doing something different and out of my comfort zone, but ultimately it had been so long since we had all met up for a good old explore it was just getting a bit rude if we had not done. What a great days exploring, not bumping into anybody else all day was not what we had expected, but we managed to see most of the cool stuff, a nice drop of lunch in the canteen sat at tables was rather nice and civilized... The pipe porn in the boiler rooms was fab, only draw back was the drive home and getting stuck in a traffic jam on the dual carriageway 1 mile from Norwich for a mile.. All in what a fab day, and thanks everybody for a top day of serious wheelchair action and photos. History stolen from wombat... such a good write up it has to be done mate Derbyshire Royal Infirmary (DRI) was established in 1810 on land formerly part of Derby's Castlefield estate on land near what is now Bradshaw Way and the A6 London Road. It was known as the Derbyshire General Infirmary at the time. In 1890 a Typhoid outbreak sweeped through the hospital, and the buildings design was blamed. The hospital was entirely demolished. A year later Queen Victoria laid the foundation stone of what would become Derbyshire Royal Infirmary. The neo-Jacobean building was completed in 1894, and its main features were its 'Onion' shaped domed towers and its central corridor which ran the length of the hospital. The hospital was expanded at several points in the 20th century, the most visible being the still used Wilderslowe Tower and the now disused A+E building built in 1970. The DRI as a result is an architectural mish-mash with the original hospital at its heart. In the late 90s, the NHS Trust's for each hospital in Derby merged, and drew up a dramatic plan to consolidate the services of both hospital's on one site. The so called 'super hospital', soon to be known as the DerbyRoyal Hospital is one of the largest in the region. There are no official plans to redevelop the now redundant Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, the land is covered by a large regeneration plan which will expand Derby's city centre southwards into what is known as Castleward. The 1987 built part of the hospital shall continue to provide medical care, providing the services of the closed Aston Hall and Grove Hospital's south of Derby. Dont worry the engineers are here
  16. Visited here to shoot part of a uni brief about detail, ring flash and crop, so was in the middle of doing that when another explorer and her mum showed up... Was more concentrating on shooting what I had visited for, but made sure I got enough images for a report... I left shooting the external stuff till after i had finished in the house. But unfortunately by the time it came to doing that it was lashing down with rain and I was pushed for time.. Could not see much in the way of history online, but if anybody knows different feel free to bung it my way and I will add it on.. Now for some photos.
  17. Gabe got on the case and asked if I was free in Norwich in a few weeks, so a few weeks later he arrived and we decided to go have a little scout about and see what was happening. Checked a few drains, but they were all rusted shut, checked a bunker, that was sealed tight, so that only left the crane that has appeared up at the hospital. That concluded the afternoon, so I dropped him off and went to the the school run bits and bobs..T scoffed down and off to pick matey 'magpie Tommy' up and then to pick up Gabe. Magpie Tommy ' lets play spot the explorer in the pub' we walk into the pub and are greeted by a bloke covered in white chalk from the mines.... Well no need to try guess how he had passed the afternoon So we headed up to the hospital, and after playing dodge the CCTV camera we found a nice easy route in. From the looks of the site it looked like it is going to be something big, and this is what it would appear they are building. The new £4.5m unit will be next to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital’s Mulbarton ward and will house two more linear accelerators, bring the total of six ‘linacs’ at N&N. The first will be installed once the building work is complete, due to be by the end of summer next year, and a second is due to be installed in 2015. This equipment provides radiotherapy for a range of cancers and works by using high energy x-rays to destroy cancer cells. Consultant oncologist Jenny Nobes said radiotherapy is often used instead of surgery, and can have the same effectiveness. She said: “Hopefully waiting times will be less for radiotherapy and more patients will be able to benefit from this locally.†The plans also include a new orthovoltage treatment room with equipment which can treat cancers which sit near the surface of the body, such as some skin cancers. The new build will include a waiting area, office space and two consulting rooms and to help cancer patients avoid a hospital admission, there will be space for a new Acute Oncology Suite to provide rapid assessment and treatment for patients who are experiencing complications with their cancer or its treatment. About 200 patients receive radiotherapy each month at the N&N, with patients referred from other local hospitals including the James Paget University Hospital in Gorleston and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King’s Lynn. Now for some photos. After we climbed down, we were just getting ready to take a few ground shots, when every generator started up and more floodlights popped on, so at this point we cut our visit rather short and headed of back to the car.. After that we dropped my mate of and decided for some easy climbing at the Mecca bingo halls. Had the usual fun here, easy climb, just got on the roof, when security pop out to have a fag and chat on the phone very loudly for ages. I thank you Carters for the lovely clean crane to climb
  18. Visited this place that I found online while researching other bits and pieces for a day out in Norfolk. So thought it would be a shame not to visit... Did not have high hopes for it, but it was not to bad... 5 of us rolled into the house and being it was only a two bedroom cottage there was not a lot of room. Over all it is in not bad condition, and has a few interesting bits and bobs left behind including a Dead bird in one of the bedrooms.. I searched online and could not find any history for the place, apart from what is listed on the estate agents websites.. All in this pukka little cottage as it stands will only set you back £250k.
  19. Visited here on my own, plan was to re shoot another site along the coast but fencing had gone up saying keep out, and as I left a van with chipboard on the back rolled up. This place is yet another pigeon haven and hence a national reserve for the pigeon crap. The floors and ladders for getting about are looking rather ropey since I last visited over 3 years ago, but still had a good snoop about. A chat with a old chap outside and I learnt that there are pople in talks with buying the site to turn it into either flats or holiday chalets. It is still up for sale for £240,000 though. History Ebridge Mill was also sometimes known as North Walsham Mill. The old mill was 5 storeys high and built of red brick with a slate roof. The mill was built over the River Ant, which later became the North Walsham & Dilham Canal. The mill remained in the ownership of the family within Cubbitt & Walker Ltd from 1869 - 1998 when it was sold to Duffields and subsequently closed. When the goodwill of the flour milling business was sold to the Millers' Mutual Association in 1966, the milling machinery was broken up leaving the old mill as an ancillary to the new provender mill built alongside.On 15th March 1969 a fire in a silo intake was put out by a fire appliance from North Walsham. 27th February 2003: A planning application to convert the mill to 10 flats was rejected by North Norfolk DC 28th August 2003: Amazingly, NNDC gave consent to convert the mill to 12 holiday units November 2005: Planning application for 12 holiday homes by Tritec Synergy. NNDC does not allow residential February 2006: NNDC still unable agree to Tritec Synergy's scheme for conversion to holiday homes March 2006: Tritec Synergy's scheme for conversion to holiday homes passed by NNDC after much debate
  20. Pontins. Hemsby. Norfolk. September 2013. shot on Velvia 50 35mm Film Visited here with my good friend and my daughter. I new the site well but had never visited, so decided that we would as I had a roll of Velvia 50 35mm film to shoot to test my new canon eos 5 out prior to starting uni. Absolutely stunned with the results. This is the 1st time I had loaded a roll of film, let alone shoot film. All the images are as they were taken in the camera, but some of them have had a minor crop to straighten them. The weather was very over cast and kept spitting with rain, so the images are taken in a random order as kept nipping back into the old pool to keep dry HISTORY Weeds now flourish on the 2,440- capacity camp which has sat empty since 2008 when Pontin’s closed it “following a period of sustained operating lossesâ€Â. Landowner Northern Trust had pinned hope on developing the site for residential use, but following heated objections from residents the plans were withdrawn in January 2012 before they came before the development control committee. Residents feared the development would place a strain on schools and doctors’ surgeries, put more cars on the road and take a valuable tourism asset away from Hemsby. In a change of tack, the site has gone back on the market advertised for “tourism/ leisure usesâ€Â.
  21. RAF RAYNHAM, Raf SCULTHORPE and a old farm. North Norfolk. July 2013 Rather than bore you to death with 3 posts that have all been done to death, I thought I would whack the day trip into 1 report. Visited with my good side kick and mini me daughter, Theanonymousexplorer, Seeker and his wife. This was more of a jolly and time to have a play as it was the start of the school hols 1st stop was Raf Raynham, this was good fun. Managed to have a little look around the boiler room and the officers mess before getting chucked out by the onsite security after getting spotted and grassed on by the lawnmower man. So next stop (after a short visit to the cock + pullit cafe was usaf/raf sculthorpe.... What a surprise we got here. After the usual walking around the HQ and police block, we headed up to the ATC tower and found a big red thing. We had a good look around and then headed of before we out stayed our welcome. The other side of Fakenham was our last stop, the old dairy farm. This was a nice little site with a few bits to shoot, but a day in the summer scorchio sun had taken its toll, and we headed of in our quest to find ice cream. Raynham Sculthorpe The old dairy farm
  22. Hi there, thought I would say hi di ho. You will prob recognise the name and realise I am not new to exploring, just this site.... Prity obvious where I am from, I shoot canon a 60d, with sigma 17-70 lens, sigma 70-200 f/2.8 and canon 50mm f/1.4 I have explored a good few places Around the uk, high low and ground level.... These include pye, st johns Lincolnshire, sandwell college and loads loads more. Nice to chat and looking forward to more exploring adventures soon.
  23. Was doing a bit of research and came across a few bits that might be of interest to any one more over that way . Also seam reasonably close together. The first was the old cinema & then Bingo hall. There where two addresses for this? I didn’t go in depth as was looking for something else entirely. Breckland Bingo & Social Club London Road, Brandon, Suffolk, IP27 0EL Winners Bingo London Rd Brandon IP27 0HY At the same time I spotted a mention of an Old Fire Pump House - fire station closed on the same Rd = London road Brandon. St Mary the Less Church, old bury road Thetford, Norfolk IP243DD This former 15th century Church with tower and occupies a site with approx 1 acre. The Church is Grade 2 * listed and is believed to be the oldest church in Thetford and it is believed the property offers 4000 sq ft. The building also has a history in television as St Mary The Less featured in the Dads Army episode 'The Shaving up of Lance Corporal Jones'. The property is situated on the outskirts of this Norfolk town which has good access to amenities and close to towns such as Bury St Edmunds and Norwich. This is an excellent opportunity to acquire a piece of history. Please note that the planning consent to turn the property into a 4 bedroom dwelling has recently expired and would require reapplication. To be fair they could all be total Lemons but if over that way might be worth a look.
  24. Hi there, my names Kimmie! Been exploring for a few years now, had some awesome adventures so far. I live in the Norfolk countryside but was originally an Essex lass. I play the drums, drunk copious amounts of tea, and like metal music. Always happy to find new 'splorin buddies local to me, preferences for hospitals and asylums but cant get enough of peely paint no matter where it is! Nice to meet you all
×