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Found 9 results

  1. On the 18th of September 2015 SSI (Thai based Sahaviriya Steel Industries) announced that due to the decline in steel prices that the Lackenby Steelworks would be paused. By September the 28th 2015, they announced the plant would be "Mothballed" due again to the poor steel trading conditions across the World, which again resulted in very low steel prices. On the 2nd of October 2015 SSI entered liquidation! On the 12th of October 2015 the Receivers announced there was no realistic prospect of finding a buyer & the Coke Ovens at Redcar would be extinguished. After being sold off by Tata Steel, the Lackenby BOS (Basic Oxygen Steel)& Concast Plant ran in conjunction with the Blast furnace at Redcar. The Blast Furnace was capable of producing 10,000 tonnes of Iron daily. which were transported by rail in specially designed rail ladles (called Torpedoes) each of these weighed in at 350 tonnes empty & 700 tonnes laden with molten Iron. Two ladles were moved at one time, hauled by purpose built 70 tonne GEC Loco"s on heavily constructed internal rail system to handle the weight. The Loco"s moved the molten Iron the 4 miles from the Furnace at Redcar & into the BOS Plant for processing. Oxygen would be blasted into the molten Iron to reduce the carbon content down to what was required for the particular use of the end product & additional substances added at this time. From here it entered the Concast Plant where t was poured into formers and rapidly cooled, once solidified it was rolled into billets before continuing into the Steel rolling mill for final processing. Visited with Stranton on a very rough weekend weather wise. Recce at night in a snowstorm with severe wind chill & visits from the Harbour Police & Secca, only to be topped the next day with more snow, more severe wind chill & more visits from Secca lol. I said there was workers inside going off the noise emitted by my buddy decided it was wind After accessing the works we found out it was indeed workers which elevated my already high pulse after running about to severe levels! I was expecting to get bust so quickly i ended up just using my mobile for the first half hour as we dodged & dived from the workers just metres from us in a highly floodlit works, whilst casting huge shadows as we tried to be stealthy as much as we could We got separated & i without phone contact ? i made my way around finally getting the camera out dodging the workers as they moved about the works & the Secca doing his drive-throughs. My highlight was being on a gantry looking down on Stranton running about from pillar to post making himself more obvious lol We finally made contact & immediately separated again? i headed away from the workers into the next complex only to find more workers FFS eventually i made it into a quiet zone of the main shed and finally relaxed. As i was stood taking long Exp pics on the 375tonne cranes trackbed i looked down below me to see a worker in high vis on his phone but hadn"t appeared to have seen me so i crept away as best i could into the shed next door which had more workers in it. At this time i got a call off Stranton about bailing as he"d just had the Secca & workers and obviously we had outstayed our welcome. Unfortunately we were at different parts of the site so it took what seemed ages before we found each other and we could do the "Headless chicken" run away dance lol As we climbed the final palisade Secca drove past us FFS Good time on reflection, even though lack of pics & the stress & strain involved too my heart Obviously our hearts go out to all the workers & their families with the continued demise of British Industry. Even the foreign owners of these plants can"t make it pay in the current economic climate Due too the high output of the Tungsten lighting i"ve decided to add a few B&W (which i don"t normally use) as if i reduce the yellow the pics are basically neutral and look "Naff" all single RAW pics BTW Enjoy......the new Tourist Hotspot lol South bank Coke Works, on the left with the Steelworks on the right in the distance.
  2. Northern Trip Part 5 – Rossendale Hospital So, continuing to try and cheer myself upI went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focusing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. The light was fast fading, and a large majority of the building had gone. Sadly the camera fault was getting worse, I didn’t realise how worse till now…. The weather was pretty nasty today but we quickly made it onto the site. It was a funny evening. We kept bumping into explorers here getting it before its gone! Its hard to believe that this place has only been shut for three years and sadly we saw very little. Rossendale General Hospital was previously known as Moorlands Infirmary which opened in 1912. It was a Workhouse when built in the 1860 so has lived a relatively short life compared to other sites in the UK. Poor Lens was struggling here…. More At: Rossendale Hospital - a set on Flickr Nothern Trip Part 6 – Zuby Fashions
  3. Northern Trip Part 4 – Robert Fletchers Paper Mill (Oldham) So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. So we wake up on Day 2/3 of the Northern Trip fairly early to make the journey to Fletchers. I had heard about this for years and years on the urbex grapevine so much that I imagined it to be ruined inside after 12 years closure. Boy was I wrong. We parked up and headed straight for the factory. First impressions were that it was a little stripped, but as I ventured in I learned how time had really stood still in this place. Nearly everything remains inside and nature is taking over all around it. So much machinery just lost in time. ‘Fletchers mill’ or ‘Fletchers Paper Mill’ as its sometimes called is Situated in the picturesque valleys of east Oldham miles from anywhere. Robert Fletcher entered the firm as a young man in his twenties in the year 1830. He was very talented, which was not missed by his employers, so he soon became manager of the bleaching department and later managed the whole site. The Crompton family held Robert in high regard and Roger Crompton whom was the last of the brothers, left him both the principal trusteeship and the option of succeeding him in the firm. After Roger Crompton died, Robert Fletcher operated the mill with conspicuous ability and integrity for many years. He later died at Vale House in Stoneclough, in May 1865, and was succeeded by his sons John and James Fletcher. They in turn were followed by their sons, John Robert Fletcher and James Fletcher, who are well remembered by many of the sites former employees today. In 1897, the firm became a Limited Company. Many things have changed since those days. The Company grew from two hundred people; now the number including to about one thousand. The top wage in those days was 6½d. an hour. There were 7 paper machines which between them produced hardly anything compared to three modern units. Throughout the years, the firm continued to expand and to increase its volume of business. A relation for high quality, reliability and fine craftsmanship was steadily built up. A second mill, at Greenfield, near Oldham which we are reporting on here; was opened in 1921. This mill specialises in the manufacture of cigarette paper. Robert Fletchers owns several hundred of acres of land around Greenfield Mill, which supports a mixed farm. Towards the late 90’s the two mills of Robert Fletcher & Son Ltd started to struggle. A combination of the increased cost of wood pulp and energy put massive financial strain on the firm. In between 1997 and 1999, the mills turnover halved as did the shareholder funds. In 2000 in an effort to save the business going to the wall resulted in the closure of the original Fletchers Stoneclough mill and 120 job losses resulted from the closure although 50 new jobs would be created at the current Greenfield site. This was short-lived and the company continued to spiral into financial ruin and in July 2001 several suppliers and creditors formally applied to wind up the company and resulted in the closure of the Greenfield site. To this day the site stands empty. Lost in time, everything left behind. Nature is taking over the place. Again; please excuse the lens wobble DHL certainly got everywhere. R.I.P. Buddy More At: Robert Fletcher Smoking Paper Factory - a set on Flickr Northern Trip Part 5 – Rossendale Hospital
  4. Northern Trip Part 2 – George Barnsley and Sons Cornish Works (Sheffield) So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. Day two and onto Sheffield for two explores, The Tool Maker: George Barnsley and Sons and of course the Crown Courts. I really liked this place, it had that real “Northern Industrial Decline†about it, it’s a true time-warp to Industrial Britain. It’s a shame places like this don’t really exist anymore. It’s the kind of place where you could go in and ask for a handful of bolts and they would give them to you for free. Its not in a great state by the look of it so I’m glad I captured it when I did. In 1823; George Barnsley was apprenticed into the file-makers trade by his mother, Anne. Anne was a widow. George was signed in to the apprenticeship – to a Thomas Wing of Sheffield – for seven years and two hundred and seventy one days. Later; George went in to partnership with his brother and they established themselves as one of the worlds leading manufacturers of shoe manufacturing tools and leather trades. Throughout the 19th century, the company grew and the Barnsley family were highly regarded in the thriving city of Sheffield. Eventually the vintage factory and production methods forced production to cease and give in to the increasingly competitive import market and the growing costs of production, finally closing in 2003. Northern Trip Part 3 – Sheffield Crown Courts Northern Trip Part 1 – The Burnley Empire More At: George Barnsley and Sons - a set on Flickr
  5. Burnley Empire, Northern Trip Part 1 So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. So I arrived in Manchester on the Friday night and off to Burnley we went to explore the “Empire†Sadly a mixture of the lens wobble fault and getting to grips with my new lens meant my photos aren’t what they could be. Sadly daylight had faded by the time we got inside… The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show. Back in 1894 it seated 1,935 people. James Pringle took over in 1909. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe who decreased seating to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but it soon reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. In December 1958; The Empire was sold to the Star Cinemas chain. Soon after this; it became a bingo club when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. Operated by Gala Bingo until its eventual 1995 closure; The future of one of Burnley’s most historic theatres is under threat after falling into a “dangerous†state. Council officials have erected safety fencing around the Grade II listed building. The Empire has been named in the Theatre Trust’s top 10 at risk theatres in Britain since 2006. The “unknown†owners have been issued with a court summons over the condition of the property which officials papers said was “dangerous and requiring part demolition and works to ensure safety.†The future of the 120 year old building is unknown, but it doesn’t look good. I neglected to take any externals so here is one used with permission of True_British_Metal. – March 2013 Onto My pics – September 2013 Northern Trip Part 2 – George Barnsley and Sons (Sheffield) More At: Burnley Empire - a set on Flickr
  6. Visted With Phill, Les, Ben, and myself, we arrived a little late to the proposed meet-up, because we got breakfast - omnomnom we managed to gain access via the wrong grill. but never-the-less, armed with a map and a compass we made our way around, Starting at cathedral we followed our noses to the smell of a fresh bbq, to see a pre-lit foil tray with no food but never mind! we plodded on, after speaking to two people who stayed over night.we attempted to get to the northern section (as we thought this was where everyone was headed), so following the map we soon lost track of where on the map we were, so vaguely following north, we somehow ended up going around 4 times and thought lets try and get back to catherdral and start again, so we plotted and pondered and eventually we turned up, about 1-2pm just as everyone finish a group shot as was on their way out, so after a few minutes to get our breath back and say our goodbyes, we decided to head back to the entrance and head to the northern section once more. So after a few twists and turns, over a few falls, we still got lost, but suddenly we saw a sign! a big square tank, after looking at the map, it sure was a eureka moment! So yeah after that we didnt get lost again, but on the way out we ended up getting trapped in the dead routes once more and could find the way home! but needless to say, we're alive! Also thanks to Phill, Les, Ben for lighting up the tunnels, and inviting me along! Anywho, sorry to drag on a bit, but here's some photos =) Thanks! Please check Out my other photos! http://www.flickr.com/photos/mperryphotography/
  7. I just happened to be up near here on holiday with the family. It was too good an opportunity to miss so I slipped away for the morning and gave the place the once over. An former Victorian Mansion, that was a school for a number of years then the head offices for an international company. They moved out in 2002 and it has been empty since. Theres not much to see other than the main reception hall but I have to say it is one of the most impressive derelict buildings I have been inside. The lower part of the main staircase was removed to enable football matches to be played on the ground floor! At the time of visiting it was pretty easy to get in to, although it has since been well secured and is monitored with 24 hour cctv. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10
  8. After fun and games in the "Poor Sick Orphanage" we decided to head over to good old Rossendale and grace her with our presance. The place is quite large so we decided with time abit against us to try the new bit all be it the most difficult to negotiate..we braved wheelie bins with wobbly chairs balanced on them...anti climb paint..rickity ladders and squeezey small windows...and huge drops where i must admit PS was a total star pulling me up the side of a wall by my hands as i dangled down it looking at him with my tourettes on fast forward my wellies trying to get tread and my mind taking me back to the film vertigo where his best mate did actually let go of him..... however ..it was well worth the trauma once in ... PS will follow with his photos...thanks for taking a peek hope you enjoy A fantastic splore as always with PS ... Bingo its Operation Time! After all the Trauma of the entry we decided to have some " Circle Time" and reflect on our exit...
  9. The Northern entrance in dover is one of the most interesting access ways ive done thanks to solar p truly an amazing place would be great to see these places back in there better days but on with the pics the draw bridge guestbook
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