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  1. Crank Caverns have been on my radar for a while, with its mythical history of child eating dwarves, oddly shaped body bags, cannibalism and a hidden chapel who wouldn't want to go and take a look? With a history like that, we decided to brave the night and risk life and limb to go in search of the evil creatures of the caverns. Meeting up with some friends we scurried through the dark to the edge of the woods. Wondering what awaited us we made our way through the trees to the cavern entrance, listening out for the scurry of tiny angry dwarf feet! Much to our disappointment, we heard no such thing so made our way in! It was a little damp and muddy in places but We explored every nook and cranny possible, with one of the lads crawling through some that weren't even possible! He is like a crawly ninja of small holes and gaps that do not exist! Despite our extensive searching, we didn't come across any dwarves or a single human bone and with no evidence of a secret church we called it a night and went our separate ways. Was a fun night out with a cracking bunch of people History Sandstone quarrying began here as early as 1730. As the quarry expanded, the cost of purchasing land to open cast mine it increased, so it was decided to opt for a different method. Instead of quarrying out the stone, they would mine it out, following a seam of stone until it ran out. This resulted in the network of caves, tunnels and shafts we see today. Rainford Delph is listed as a Colliery by 1854, under the ownership of Charles Howarth or Yorkshire Charlie as he was known locally by 1880. Mining finally ceased and the woods and caverns were used as a game reserve by the Earl of Derby until 1939 when they became a storage facility for ammunition for the anti-aircraft position at Crank. After the war, the caverns ceased use as a game reserve. Myths and Legends Child Eating Dwarves "Vicious dwarves" were once rumoured to inhabit the labyrinth of caverns in Crank. In the late 18th century four children decided to explore the sandstone caverns and vanished. One child survived and told a terrifying tale about small old men with beards, who talked in an unknown language, they killed his three friends and chased him. The petrified child stumbled over human bones in the caves and finally managed to scramble through an opening to the surface as a hand was grabbing at his ankle. The authorities became concerned because a number of people had gone missing in the area near the cave entrances and apparently they sent in the army to install gates and bars. It is apparently undecided if this was to keep people out or keep something in. Oddly shaped body bags Apparently about 17 or 18 years ago two young lads entered the caverns and got lost, they had told their parents where they were going and when they didn’t arrive home their parents informed the police. After a couple of days searching the police sealed off the area and removed to body bags from the caverns. This is where it gets strange, they were also reported to have removed 7 more body bags from the caverns, one of the bags was said to have not been in a body shape but was square. Cannibalism There is a story about some scouts who went down the caverns for a look around and at the end of the day one of the scouts had not come back out. Eventually, they called out Cave Rescue to try and find the boy. After a long search they found him or what was left of him, allegedly the boy was partly eaten. The parents of the child wanted it all kept secret so the press didn't get hold of the story and they could give their son a peaceful send-off. Another story tells of a child's head found in a cave, along with evidence of cannibalism. After a second investigation, the caves either collapsed or gunpowder was used to seal them. Church Cavern Two heavily armed soldiers descended into the caverns with torches and claimed that they not only found a heap of human bones, they also found the ruins of an ancient church of some unknown denomination. The interior of the church was lit by three large candles and grotesque gargoyles formed part of an altar. Throughout the exploration of the underground, the soldiers said they felt as if they were being watched, and also heard voices speaking in an unknown language. Anyway enough of this rubbish here's a few pics to look at instead...... Thanks for looking
  2. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  3. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
  4. After not exploring for what seemed like forever, it was time to get back out again.. and what better way to kick off with a euro! went away with loocyloo and a couple of non members, and had an absolute blast despite the loss of a memory card with half my pictures on:mad: What seemed like a relativity bland building from the outside was actually a lovely little place inside, the chapel being one of the my favourite features. Was a quiet, uneventful explore apart from getting absolutely soaked in a downpour on the way back to the car:thumb Thanks for looking:thumb
  5. I don't really understand how stuff like this works but I think it just gets really hot and then farts big turds of metal out of it's arse. I CAN tell you one thing though, it's fucking huge and it's fucking epic running around it with your mates in the middle of the night! Founded by Dorman Long in 1917, the steel produced here was used to build structures including the Sydney Harbour Bridge, Tyne Bridge and the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Under the socialist plans of the post-Second World War Labour Party, in 1967 Dorman Long was absorbed into the newly created nationalised company, British Steel Corporation. After privatisation under Margaret Thatcher's Conservative Party in 1988 to form British Steel plc, in 1999 the company merged with Netherlands-based steel maker Koninklijke Hoogovens to form Corus Group. Corus utilised the site for basic oxygen steelmaking, using iron produced at the company's Redcar blast furnace. In 2007, Corus was bought by Tata Steel. Tata stopped production in 2009 and 1,700 jobs were lost at the plant. On 24 February 2011, the steelworks was purchased by Thai-based Sahaviriya Steel Industries (SSI). On 15 April 2012 the plant was officially reopened. On 18 September 2015, production was paused due to the decline in steel prices. On 28 September 2015, the plant was "mothballed" amid poor steel trading conditions across the world and a drop in steel prices. On 2 October, the owner of the site, SSI UK, entered liquidation. On 12 October 2015 the receiver announced there was no realistic prospect of finding a buyer and the coke ovens would be extinguished. 1. I didn't get any usable externals so nicked this from google 2. After a Speedy entrance we found ourselves making our way up through the bowels of the furnace 3. 4. 5. 6. Quite fancy popping down to the bottom of here next time (look out for Part 2 of 36 coming soon ) 7. 8. It's difficult to capture the sheer size of this thing 9. 10. 11. This is my favourite shot from the evening's proceedings. 12. 13. You could still feel hot air coming from the top of these chimneys 14. Heading back down we had a nose around in this large area around the 'Brain' as I like to call it. 15. 16. This workshop was close by and a few other little rooms 17. Worker's coat 18. 19. Control Room 20. 21. 22. The Brain 23. Nothing I've seen in Belgium compared to the size of this, both sides looked like this.... We only scratched the surface of this huge site on this occasion but in Parts 2-36 I hope to cover everything from the kitchen toaster to the men's urinals. No stone will be left unturned I assure you of that. Thanks to @Maniac, @Merryprankster and Elliot5200 for a great night, it was a blast
  6. Evening all, Last place we visited in November's tour of Italy was this place. Not sure on the history but it was a dark, rainy morning and had to be accessed early doors due to the built up neighbourhood. Nothing else really to add but the photos. Still got some more to process but this is pretty much what I wanted to share for now. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 Thanks for looking in.
  7. AKA House of Wheelchairs. The info on this seems a bit sketchy, one thing that's pretty much certain is that it is a former nursing home which has been abandoned since the 1990's. It was clearly a grand place in its prime and is in a very peaceful setting, on the site of a former monastery I believe. There is a story that the reason why it was abandoned was that one elderly resident met her maker due to her chair crashing down the entrance steps (which you can just make out on the right in the first picture). Whether there is any truth to this I cannot be sure. Due to time constraints of having to catch a flight to Berlin the attic and lower ground floor were not seen. Still, there was plenty to make it a gem of a place, hope you agree!
  8. Maison Kirsch, Luxembourg Visited with: PG UE and Scott Chadwick. Visit date: November 2014 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. History No history available at this time, however, if I manage to find any I will update this report. My Visit This is the first and only location I have been to in Luxembourg at the time of writing this report and was very excited to visit here. We arrived a little earlier than expected here due to the fact that a location we planned to visit first had been demolished. We had been told that Kirsch is dark inside and difficult to shoot in certain areas due to the lack of light, this turned out to totally correct, however, as you do we made the best of what light we had or did not have I should say! The Maison is not small but only around half of the site is for living in, the other half looked like it was for cattle or horses from what I could see through the windows anyway. Unfortunately though these areas were not accessible, luckily the main house was open. After having a quick walk around we split up and started to photograph Kirsch as much as we could before we had to set off back into France for our final location before flying home later in the day. Lets get on with the photos….. I started on the top floor with the bedrooms and this is where I spent most of my time. There is 3 bedrooms on this floor and as PG UE had called shotgun on the main bedroom I headed into one of the others. Here is a shot of bedroom number 1, not much in here apart from a bed, some old weighing scales for food etc and some scales for us mere mortals. Then I headed into bedroom number 2. This room consisted of 2 beds but one was covered in lots of junk such as old clothes and very damp magazines. I did however spot a nice little bottle of Mosquito repellent on the window sill. A few minutes after I had finished in bedroom number 2 PG finished in the main room and I headed in to take my shots. In this room there is lots to look at such as the main bed, cupboard, side tables, dressing table and lots of little knick-knacks that had been left behind. Anyway, I will let you see the images as they tell the story far better than I can. So the main bedroom done I headed for the loft space that we found earlier, again this area was full of items. My favourite things from the loft though had to be the toy Aeroplane and the bike! Why on earth a bike is in the loft I have no idea… So the bedrooms and loft photographed now it was time to head down to the ground floor which consisted of a dining room, kitchen, office, main hallway, stairs and storage rooms. I will not be posting images from all of the rooms of this report but over time I will add them to my flickr page, the link can be found at the end of this report. Here is a shot of my favourite place within the maison, the main hallway. Why I hear say… No idea really I just loved the dark wood panelling leading you to the door with the light streaming in above. However to get there I had to pass all of the dead mice and rat remains on the floor! You are right I am weird to say this was my favourite area but it just felt calming for some reason. Here is a shot of the stairs leading up to the top floor. The last area I went into was a great area as well, the store room which was full of jars with pickled food in them and other items such as wine on the opposite side of the room. When I entered this room I got a really weird feeling something just did not feel normal, this has never happened to me before on any explore. Now just let me say I am not a ghost hunter or a believer in ghosts as I have never seen, heard or witnessed anything to say that spirits exists. Anyway as I said I got a really weird feeling upon entering the room, I shouted if PG or Scott was around but no answer, I then shouted a little louder and got a reply from PG UE that he was in the next room. So, with my mind at rest I got back to taking my photos. A few weeks later I spoke to PG about this whilst we was on a UK explore and he said I bet it was the store room and then followed on by saying that he had the same type of feeling when he was in there as well, Anyway I digress. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Maison Kirsch on my Flickr page which can be found here https://www.flickr.com/photos/119757413@N07/ Final Thoughts For my first Luxembourg location I have to say I was very pleased with what Kirsch had to show me, Also, this was my first explore of an old house. As much as I enjoyed my time here I do have to say that it felt a little strange walking around rooms with personal items just sat slowly being covered in dust. People were born here, people grew up here, people had laughed and cried here, good and bad times enjoyed and worked through here, people may have even died here… Now there is nothing, no laughter, no noise, nothing, just items of people long gone…… So sad. To read more location reports of the places we visited on the tour please click here, http://www.alanduggan-photography.co.uk/tag/tournov2014/ Thanks for reading, Dugie
  9. UK RAF Daws Hill, November 2014

    Visited with TBM, PCWOX and SouthSideAssasian During WWII, in 1942, U.S. Air Forces first became stationed on the site and took over the Wycombe Abbey School for the War Efforts. The school was returned in 1945 at the end of the war, and 1952 saw the U.S. returning to the area and this time taking Daws Hill House and the site became busier as the Cold War developed. By 1969 approximately 800 people lived and worked on site, but this was scaled down by the 1970s and then in 1992; it hit as low as 350 at the demise of the Cold War. by 2002 the MOD (British Forces) began talks of closing USAF/RAF Daws Hill. The U.S. Navy wasn't keen on these plans and wished to remain on site. By 2007 the site was abandoned and put on the market. It sold to a UK Property Developer in 2011 and has fallen into ruin. The small American style town is slowly being torn down in favour of affordable housing. There must have really been a community spirit here amongst the Americans living on site, and much like Upper Heyford; the site was built to suit the tastes said Americans were accustomed too. There is of course the nuclear bunker on site, but that is being used still. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7513/15932478082_ca897e6af4_c.jpg #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157649525372796/
  10. Evening all, A very small, but beautiful round chapel in the Italian countryside was visited as part of our trip in November. Beauty of a ceiling which is the main event as its a brief stop judging by the photos I've seen before of this. Visited with Dursty, John and Mike. 1. 2. 3. 4. Thanks for looking in.
  11. Intro Posted a report of the water tower earlier this year on another forum, I revisited with a friend who had never done Urban Exploring before and found it a lot of fun. I personally like doing a fully thorough report, so if you're easily bored, the photos are at the end . History The Hornchurch facility was officially opened in 1938 as an old people’s home, called Suttons Institution, but soon played a key role in the Battle of Britain – housing RAF airmen during the Second World War. www.british-history.ac.uk said this: St. George's hospital, Sutton's Lane, Hornchurch, was built by Essex county council and opened in 1939 as an old people's home called Suttons Institution. (fn. 152) During the Second World War it was used to house airmen from R.A.F. Hornchurch. In 1948 it was taken over by the Ministry of Health as a hospital and was given its present name. It has over 400 beds, used mainly for geriatric cases. The Ingrebourne Centre, which is an independent part of the hospital, provides psychiatric treatment for 20 resident and many day patients. In 1948 the Sutton’s Lane building was renamed St George’s and turned into a hospital. At this time it had 700 beds. In July 1952 a Neurosis Unit with 20 beds was established at the Hospital in what had previously been the Observation Ward for Warley Hospital. In 1956 this Unit became independent of Warley Hospital and was renamed the Ingrebourne Centre (after the stream running through the grounds). In 1957 the Hospital had 424 beds. By 1964 it contained mainly elderly patients with an average age of 80 years, and some considerably older needing greater nursing care. The Hospital was seriously understaffed, despite efforts to recruit more nurses. Some 329 chronic and aged patients were cared for by 30 full-time and 15 part-time staff (an improvement on the previous year, with 28 full-time and 19 part-time staff). In 1967 there were 422 beds for chronically sick patients and dermatological and neurosis cases. In 1972 the Hospital had 384 beds for the chronically sick, dermatological and physical medicine patients, as well as neurosis cases. Following a major reorganisation of the NHS in 1974, control of the Hospital passed to the Barking and Havering Area Health Authority, part of the North East Thames Regional Health Authority. By 1984 the Hospital had 318 beds and was under the control of the Barking, Havering and Brentwood District Health Authority. In 1991, following another major NHS reg organisation and the introduction of the 'market' system, the Hospital came under the control of the North East London Foundation Trust. It offered respiratory, physiotherapy, heart and stroke services, and in-patient rehabilitation services. By the end of the 1990s the Hospital was under the threat of closure, with a proposal to sell the site for housing. In 2003 the Trust cut the bed complement from 180 intermediate and long-term care beds to 60, for patients recovering from serious conditions, such as strokes or falls. The future of the site was a live issue since at least 2005, when a consultation was launched on whether to refurbish, redevelop or close the hospital. The number of patients being admitted fell that year and bosses considered closing one of the hospital’s four wards. A campaign, led by the then Hornchurch MP James Brokenshire, was organised to halt the closure of St George’s. The consultation was put on hold while the government altered health policy. In 2007, the then head of nursing at the hospital, Lynne Swiatczak, said that the facilities were “not suitable for the care of adults†– and Havering Primary Care Trust clarified that only a rebuild would ensure that the facilities would remain up to the standard that patients expect. But the Recorder recently learnt that only two full building inspections have been carried out at the site in the last 10 years – in 2001 and 2008. In 2009, health chiefs paid about £100,000 for plans for a new high-tech building on the same site and another consultation was launched. Chas Hollwey, then chief executive of NHS Havering, said: “The old hospital is an important historical landmark which is held in great affection,†while adding that the building could not remain in its current state. The £100,000 plans were not acted on and NHS Havering was subsequently abolished and the consultation shelved. Inpatients from St George’s two wards were due to be moved out of the hospital in mid-November, with outpatient services remaining. However, the discovery of Legionella bacteria has now left the hospital lying empty. History thanks to: http://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/stgeorgehornchurch.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Geor...ital,_Havering Future The future of the Hospital is still uncertain. In August 2012 the Trust announced that despite problems with the building, it was intending to redevelop the site and create a new purpose-built health centre. In October 2012 the wards had to be closed because legionella was discovered in the Hospital's water system. The 44 patients were transferred elsewhere - some to the Brentwood Community Hospital, others to Grays Court in Dagenham, while some were able to be discharged. The Out-Patients Department also closed and the Hospital has never reopened. In July 2013 discussions were held with the Havering Clinical Commissioning Group, now the owners of the site after another major NHS reorganisation, as to the possibility of its redevelopment, with part being used for a health centre. The site has slowly been stripped of most of it's equipment, doorframes, doors, furniture, patient memories and some paint. All wiring has gone and fully stripped. Most likely by the owners as it seems to have been removed and not ripped out. On our visit we noticed a few new cameras, sensors and a few new and very recent signs stating to keep out as demolition/dismantling work has begun. There was no evidence of this inside, but the signs looked pretty fresh so this could well be the future of the site. This was taken from a report on the future of the site in October last year (2013): Hornchurch could be robbed of its promised multi-million pound health complex. The GPs in charge of commissioning Havering’s health services have been told they no longer have the power to propose a building development on the St George’s Hospital site – because they don’t own it any more. Instead, they must show a clinical need for the services – and councillors aren’t sure one exists. “All the services they are proposing could easily go into health centres,†said Cllr Nic Dodin, vice- chairman of Havering Council’s health overview and scrutiny committee. “NHS England would be right to refuse the proposal.†As part of this year’s NHS reorganisation, which involved GPs taking over commissioning on April 1, St George’s and its estate in Suttons Lane are now in the hands of NHS England. That means if the Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) can’t convince NHS England that there is a clinical need for the site, it could be sold in its entirety. If this happens, the money won’t go back into Havering, as would have been the case before April, but into a central pot. The CCG is confident it can reach an agreement with NHS England that will look similar to its original plans. But with local GP practices muted in their enthusiasm for moving to the new site, it may face an uphill battle. A spokesman for Havering Clinical Commissioning Group said: “We are confident that our original plans for a centre of excellence on part of the St George’s site remain valid and that they represent the best way of providing much needed, joined up health services, particularly for older people in Havering. “We continue to work hard to make the case for the new facility – that hasn’t changed – and are progressing with our plans. “What has changed is simply the way the government now funds these projects. Basically, all property previously owned by PCTs has transferred to a new central body called NHS Property Services.†http://www.romfordrecorder.co.uk/new...ture_1_2847799 Present state of the site The site has been stripped of almost everything, luckily the mortuary fridges are still most in tack and present, the autopsy slab had been ripped and smashed a year ago. All furniture, wiring and equipment has now been stripped and removed. There isn't any signs of metal thievery as roofs and wiring seems to be either in tack or untouched. The buildings themselves are in good condition and there seems to be no subsidence, cracking or natural damage, it'd be a shame if the site was flattened, especially the art deco water tower, hall and administration building. 60% of the windows had been replaced with newer once, not in any particular order, just random windows and some frames didn't even have windows as if part way through being replaced, this seemed a bit strange as there clearly wasn't any construction work going on. The boilers are now gone and probably sold for scrap. Visit Had a good laugh, ducking and diving from security who was oblivious on his phone, few close calls, had to dive in some tunnels at one point and hid in some rooms multiple times. Luckily for us this guy must be pretty chilled out. My friend has just got into photography and I suggested this site as they were interested in Urban exploring, I ended up going with him as I wanted to return for some better shots and to get some decent snaps of the morgue. We happen to arrive just as the guard was patrolling but after we waited it out, we were over the fence (Whilst my friend ripped his trousers) and made a quick dash for the main complex. from then on it was a nice 4/5 hour wander until dark. That Half mile corridor still amazes me. History etc. all stolen from my previous report on another forum. The photos The sun was perfect that day, an awesome golden glow radiated from one side The paint is slowly starting to show it's age Golden corridors Few signs of vandalism Morning frost hiding in the shadows Rays Stairs Green corridors Nature reclaiming The hall More stairs Chairs Sun set Red light is all we had that would light the fridges up enough, didn't turn out too bad though I think And of course, the table Cheers for looking, hope large is an ok file size. Thanks!
  12. Intro I had seen this on 28DL in the past, back then, however, it looked like there wasn't much left of the site and the one block that remained seemed destined to be demolished before 2013 was over and so I looked over it. Then in early November whilst passing on the trains towards Stratford I noticed it was still standing, then on the way to Basildon we jumped off quick and a look. The place surprised me and hope the picture reflect that well. I've uploaded in large today, if it's a bit overkill, I'm more than happy to downsize them. As some of you may know, I took a few film shots but the negatives were scratched in development, so the ones with blue streaks are film. History Oldchurch Hospital originated from the Romford Union workhouse, which had been built during 1838 and 1839 to the southwest of Romford. The 5-acre site on Oldchurch Road was purchased by the Union from a Mr Philpot at £160 an acre. The 2-storey workhouse building was of a cruciform build, a popular design with the dormitory blocks laid out in a cross-shape. It could house 450 inmates. Romford (or "Rumford", as it was known back then) was the subject of a report in An Account of Several Workhouses..., dated October 24th, 1724. The administration block was at the south of the site, whilst the main accommodation blocks radiated from a central hub or core. Observation windows in the hub enabled the workhouse master to observe and watch the inmates in each of the four exercise yards/playgrounds. The dormitories and Day Rooms for the female inmates were on the eastern side in the northeast and southeast arms of the cross, while the males occupied the western side in the northwest and southwest arms. The kitchens and dining rooms were located at the north of the building. In 1893 the workhouse was renamed the Romford Poor Law Institution. Later an infirmary block was added at the north of the site. During WW1 the infirmary of the Institution became the Romford Military Hospital, an auxiliary hospital for the Colchester Military Hospital, with 82 beds for wounded and sick servicemen. In 1924 further additions were built at the north and east of the site. In 1929, following the abolition of the Poor Law Guardians, the workhouse and its infirmary came under the administration of Essex County Council, who converted the buildings into the Oldchurch County Hospital. The Hospital, which incorporated the old workhouse buildings, was much expanded during the 1930s to have over 800 beds. During WW2 it joined the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) with 868 beds, of which 96 were EMS beds for air-raid casualties. In 1948 the Hospital joined the NHS under the control of the Romford Group Hospital Management Committee, part of the North East Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board. It remained an acute hospital and, by 1962, it had 651 beds for acute and maternity patients. In 1974, following a major reorganisation of the NHS, the Hospital came under the control of the Havering District Health Authority, part of the Barking and Havering Area Health Authority of the North East Thames Regional Health Authority. Its maternity services had closed and it had 629 beds for acute cases. In 1980 it had 600 beds. In 1982, after another NHS reorganisation, it came under the control of the Barking, Havering and Brentwood District Health Authority. By 1986 it had 530 beds. In 1993, following another NHS reform, the Hospital was under the control of the Havering Hospitals NHS Trust. In 2000 it had 473 beds. Despite local opposition, the old cruciform workhouse building was demolished so that a temporary single-storey building could be erected in its place. In 2003 the Hospital was administered by the Barking, Havering and Redbridge NHS Trust. By 2005 there were 565 beds. The Hospital closed in 2006, with the last patient being seen on 15th December. Services were transferred to the nearby newly built Queen's Hospital and to the King George Hospital in Chadwell Heath. Present status (February 2008) The site has been sold and is being redeveloped by E.ON and Taylor Wimpey East London. The front parts of the Hospital have been demolished and keyworker housing - Reflections - is being erected in the northeast corner. The southeast corner is bare, awaiting house-building. Now only Block 8 stands. Present Out of all the hospital buildings, only Block 8 remains. The building at present sits in the middle of a building site surrounded by rising apartment blocks, it seems surreal to have this one block in the middle of such a modern development. The building it's self quite structurally sound, it's just the exterior fittings have decayed and fallen apart, the internal décor has been stripped and a lot of the windows have just been ripped out. The slates on the roof clearly aren't in the best of conditions and I assume the place leaks like a colander when it does rain. Green growth seems to be flourishing and a lot of the wood is practically rotting into soil. Windows remain smashed and paint has begun to peel and flake. The floor, doors and obviously some windows have been stripped out and dumped in the courtyard in a big heap. This sounds bad, but inside the places looks a lot better than it did with the floor! Little remains equipment wise, a vending machine, table and a chair remain in the hall. but despite this, a lot of the original furnishings remain in situ, i.e. the stair case, main window frames and a lot of the décor in the hall, A few signs remain in place and if I'm honest, this place is very photogenic, looks great inside but very dilapidated. The exterior shows a lot of stunning architecture, except it has been ripped apart by contractors. All in all, this building COULD have a future, and personally believe it deserves to have one. Future Planning permission has been submitted to demolish Block 8, unfortunately, it seems likely they will grant it. Block 8 now sticks out like a sore thumb and has literally been bullied into submission by close by rising developments that shadow it's future. Strategic planning application stage 1 referral (new powers) Town & Country Planning Act 1990 (as amended); Greater London Authority Acts 1999 and 2007; Town & Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2008. The proposal Demolition of block 8 (former nurses’ home) and redevelopment to provide 77 new homes, and associated parking and landscaping. The applicant The applicant is Taylor Wimpey East London, and the architect is CJCT. Strategic issues The loss of the non-designated heritage asset raises an objection in principle. Notwithstanding this, other issues with respect to housing, urban design, inclusive access, sustainable development and transport are also identified. Recommendation That Havering Council be advised that the application does not comply with the London Plan for the reasons set out in paragraph 52 of this report. Swan new homes will likely be granted permission and demolish it, rebuilding a 77 apartment residential block in it's place. (http://www.swannewhomes.co.uk/oldchurch-park/), having said that, they're new developments work well with Romford as a town, it's just a big shame they had to eradicate the Oldchurch site to build it. Visit and pictures Oldchurch Well, I had a lot of fun visiting this site, must of spent an hour in here. hiding from the builders was a lot of fun The fence guarding the place was a little off putting at first but it soon came apparent we had no choice but to jump it Then after UrbanAlex cautiously clambered over it we were in and quickly made our way round the front to see what was what Aware of the builders that could easily have seen us from up on the scaffolding of the new developments, we found our way inside block 8 and begun our visit A lot of people seemingly complain of 'derps' like this, but a lot of us love them, I.E. this one, it looks great from the outside and the inside, the decay was stunning and the place had a great feel to it We wandered the corridors and rooms and realised how quiet it was, and we expected to hear the contractors outside, but silence. It seemed like an odd contrast of the old buildings and decay to the new developments and contractors Staying quite ourselves was quite a task, a lot of it was crumbling under our feet, but the looming cranes outside reminded us we didn't need to be as stealthy as expected, Block 8 was forgotten We continued to mooch and snap away, oblivious to the public wandering passed outside As we ventured East on the site, we noticed more windows were missing, as we wandered the 3rd floor corridor, we looked Left and realised we were looking straight into the front room of a new apartment next door Time to go, and as we crept across the courtyard to the gate, we were spotted by builders up on the roof of a development One began to shout followed by another, and another until a harsh sounding choir of contractors were howling at us as we ran across I jumped that 9ft fence like Mario, wish I could've said the same about Alex, we got stuck up top and hurt his leg With a bit of encouragement he was free and we made a run for it knowing full well the builders, security or perhaps worse were coming for us We hoped down into the subway and made a B-line to a shop to get some cheap chocolate, then we were off to Basildon Maybe there's hope for this place, maybe a resident will appeal or the contractors will maybe miraculously add it into their development Whatever happens, this place is great, full of character and it'll be a real shame if it's flattened, I hope you enjoyed the report and enjoyed reading, apologies for the blue streaks in the film set and the pic heavy report. Cheers for looking!
  13. I visited with sentinel, extreme_ironing, overarch, and makepondsnotwar. This was my third visit here, we had a quick look for the padded cell in the psychiatric block but it wasn't accessible so we made our way into the main complex instead. We had 5 hours inside with no hassle. The main target for me was the X-ray department which is still full of machines and equipment. It is amazing to see all this stuff left behind which must have cost a small fortune at one time. The NHS claim they kept anything of any worth and that these machines were too old to be of any use, I find that hard to believe. Here are some historical details about the hospital. The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746-61. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients. Haslar was the biggest hospital and the largest brick building in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716-1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785-1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh Phrenological Society. In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar). In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War. In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services; the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar. In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar. In 2001 Haslar was designated a Grade II listed historic park and several of the buildings are listed. Also in 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy. The hospital formally closed in 2009 and the site has since meant to have started redevelopment, although there are no signs of this having taken place. The citizens of Gosport are said to deeply saddened by the closure of Haslar and there are campaigns to keep the hospital open. Gosport politicians cite that the UK is the only country in the Western world not to have a dedicated Military hospital, run by and for its military staff who understand the needs and ideology of the service person. At present, most casualties from conflicts return to Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham for treatment at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine. 1. 2.At one time patients would be brought into the hospital by train along these tracks 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. X-Ray Department 14. 15. 16. 17. The insides of a scanner 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. We had a spectacular sunset to end the day Thanks for having a mooch
  14. Beziers is a small town in the south of France, after failing at various derelict buildings in the town centre I set my sights upon this stadium out of town (which isn't derelict by the way). My aim was to find a way up onto the roof simply for the hell of it. I scoped it out during the day and was just about to go for it when the lawnmower man drove out onto the pitch in his tractor. Probably for the best as it turns out there may have been some spectators watching me from a restaurant window on the other side. I returned early one morning and went for it straight away, just catching the end of the sunrise as I reached the top. Once I'd taken a few pictures and watched the sun coming up for a bit I spotted a car patrolling beneath me around the structure so I got myself out of view and made my descent quickly to avoid being caught. It didn't matter, I'd succeeded in what I set out to do, bending a few rules and taking some snaps from a different vantage point, all good fun! Stade de la Mediterranee is a multi-purpose stadium in Beziers, France. The stadium is able to hold 18,555 (16110 seated) people and was built in 1989. It is currently used mostly for rugby union matches and is the home stadium of AS Beziers Herault. The stadium is also used to host Rugby League Internationals. On December 4, 1994, France hosted Australia in Beziers. In Mal Meninga's last match, 8,000 people saw the Kangaroos run out 74-0 winners. More recently, Stade de la Mediterranee has been used as the home ground for the France based Moroccan national team. Cheers for looking
  15. Zeche Hugo Well this place has been photographed and reported numerous times so won't bore you with a load of text So on with the photos
  16. Morning all, just another rooftop report I'm afraid, bit of a special one this though. By no means am I the first to do it and I'm sure I won't be the last. I visited with extreme_ironing first time round when I took these shots and second time with a certain group of drunk explorers which was eventful to say the least The Lloyd's building (sometimes known as the Inside-Out Building) is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior. Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by English Heritage to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch". 1. The current Lloyd's building was designed by architect Richard Rogers and built between 1978 and 1986. Bovis was the management contractor. Like the Pompidou Centre in Paris (designed by Renzo Piano and Rogers), the building was innovative in having its services such as staircases, lifts, electrical power conduits and water pipes on the outside, leaving an uncluttered space inside. The 12 glass lifts were the first of their kind in the United Kingdom. The building consists of three main towers and three service towers around a central, rectangular space. The Lloyd's building is 88 metres (289 ft) to the roof, with 14 floors. On top of each service core stand the cleaning cranes, increasing the overall height to 95.10 metres (312 ft). Modular in plan, each floor can be altered by addition or removal of partitions and walls. The building was previously owned by Dublin-based real estate firm Shelbourne Development Group, who purchased it in 2004 from a German investment bank. In July 2013 it was sold to the Chinese company Ping An Insurance in a £260 million deal. 2. Pipe porn 3. stair Porn 4. 5. 6. 7. The Willis building 8. 9. 10. Window cleaner's box 11. Cleaner's crane 12. 13. Extreme_ironing doing the stuff that I don't have the bottle to do! 14. Plant Room 15. 16. Looking down on Gotham City below Thanks for looking
  17. Prisoner of War Camp 116 was set up in 1941 to house Italian prisoners of war, and from 1943-1944 it mainly held German and Austrian prisoners. Camp 116 (Mill Lane Camp, Hatfield Heath) conforms to the so-called ‘Standard’ layout. Seeing as this was only my 2nd time of going out I wasn't too impressed. The gates were locked and there was barbed wire fencing sections off - Would prob have been better at night and with someone with more experience.
  18. While in the area we popped into this place, not too much left and no access to the underground but a good little wander. History Copenacre Quarry was purchased by the MOD in 1940 and, following an urgent request for underground storage in 1941, made available to the Navy. The estimated cost to convert the quarry was £192,500, but the Navy demanded the best of everything and within weeks costs had exceeded the agreed budget. In 1972 it was announced that Copenacre was to close, but with a staff of 1,700 this raised concerns. Following a Public Enquiry the depot was retained indefinitely. However, Copenacre closed in 1995 and was sold off in 1997. Some pics Thanks for looking
  19. Yesterday, I went to visit a friend. A while ago, he moved to the middle of North Rhine-Westphalia, specifically the known Ruhr area, because of a girl he met on the interwebs. While planning the ride, I was looking here and there on Google Earth if there's something to visit, just to find most things torn down or turned into parks. The day scheduled, literally the last minute possible to make a detour in time, I found out the town where Zeche P is located, turning out to be 30km from where I wanted to go, anyway. Sadly, it was a rather rushed job, but at least there's a few pictures that came out OK. The nearby powerplants were clouding the sun, due to the cold weather, which was a bit annoying. A flashlight would have helped the explore, and some glowsticks to create a setting of some pretty dark rooms. Alas, maybe the coming summer... Also, there seems to be some sort of cold war between visitors and the owners of the place, because there's plenty of new welded joints blocking access to the office buildings. #1 Zeche P by cerealbawx, on Flickr #2 Zeche P by cerealbawx, on Flickr #3 Zeche P by cerealbawx, on Flickr #4 Zeche P by cerealbawx, on Flickr #5 Zeche P by cerealbawx, on Flickr #6 Zeche P by cerealbawx, on Flickr
  20. On our way to this location I bought a new car, and although the bastard is giving me a lot of shit it was a good day. The story goes that about 20 years ago the original garage owner died and because of some dissagreements in the family they just left it for what is was. But somewhere in those 20 years someone reopened the garage, but the showroom and the cars where still left untouched. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. https://www.flickr.com/photos/21392885@N04/sets/72157648854763418/ Cheers!
  21. I visited Beziers in the south of France last week. It was almost as if they were expecting me, every building I explored last time was sealed and I couldn't get into any others, of which there are many. So, I headed out of town to an industrial area my brother suggested and it didn't take me long to find this little drainage tunnel. It begins outdoors and is just a case of hopping down and walking in. I thought it would just come out underneath the other side of the road but it went on for a few hundred metres before continuing outdoors. There was also a bit with a lower roof that branched off and seemed to go a lot further but as I only had my trainers with me it was a bit trickier to navigate without getting wet feet. I never thought drains would be my thing but I quite enjoyed it down there really and found it pretty relaxing. Also the photography aspect was an enjoyable challenge and I taught myself a few things. On my way out there was a confused looking Frenchman who kept saying 'Pourquoi?' to me as I left which was pretty amusing. Feel free to point out the correct terminology regarding this type of tunnel as I haven't got a clue! Anyway, here's some of my pics. I can't imagine any drains in the UK with an entrance like this Self timer, leg it, act natural and hope for the best The following day I went back and had a look down this tunnel instead which involved a lot of stooping It seemed to go on forever this one so will head back down there next time for sure Thanks for looking
  22. So its nice to get into another derp, been a while since I've done a nice, exciting big derp and this is one I have considered doing for a while. Visited on a miserable November morning with MrDan We started off with the maternity unit which has been disused since 1998 and it certainly shows! Although much to our suprise and for reasons unknown, the electricity is on in this very dilapidated part of the site. We spent a good few hours photographing this part of the hospital before moving on to the X-ray wards which closed in 2009. The power was recently on in here, with reports of their being juice to the X-Ray Machines! On this occasion the power was off, which can only be a good thing really as someone who doesn't know what they are doing could hurt someone. We spent a good 7-8 hours in here and progressed onto the main hospital part but found secca sealing it on the inside so decided to call it a day as the night was drawing in anyway. The Cambridge Military Hospital opened in 1879 and was to play a vital role in The First World War as being the first base to receive casualties from The Western Front. The first case of plastic surgery in the British Empire was performed here; at the CMH; Captain Gillies (later known as Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. During this time he was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. He was soon to fall in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 he came back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the CMH. When the Second World War was over, the importance of Britain's military commitments declined and civilians were admitted to the hospital. The Maternity wing closed in around 1996-98. Other sections of the hospital remained open as Frimley Park Hospital which was an NHS civilian hospital which closed sometime in 2009. #1 #2 #3 #4 The famous "Bleeding Doors" which were done this way for a film apparently. #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/with/15635196688/
  23. So after a few months of inactivity it was finally time to hit the streets again After a mixed feelings day we stopped at this location #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6
  24. I figured I had scoured my local area on Google Earth well enough, consider the surprise this turning out to be nearby and I didn't spot it. Too bad it's facing the north side and thus doesn't get much direct sunlight, might have resulted in nice shadows. Mission to Mars by cerealbawx, on Flickr Mission to Mars by cerealbawx, on Flickr Mission to Mars by cerealbawx, on Flickr Mission to Mars by cerealbawx, on Flickr Mission to Mars by cerealbawx, on Flickr Mission to Mars by cerealbawx, on Flickr
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