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Found 6 results

  1. Visited on two occasions with a non-member. The first time round, we spent more time on the East side and completely missed the bunkers. We heard diggers and machinery, but never saw any hi-vis types. There were a fair few explorers milling about though, which gave it a sort of Upwood (but not as crap) vibe. My mate wanted to get a taste of the 'Eastern' weather. Safe to say it was pretty dismal this winter, although he avoided the worst of the snow in January. There was plenty of sludge and mud to go around though On our second visit we managed to get to the bunkers, but found that they were deceptively sealed. We saw less people this time round and realised that much more of the site is now rubble than we originally thought. Considering in its heyday it had over 500 buildings, I'd say there are only now a few dozen of the bigger ones left. We nearly bumped into the demo crew on site a couple of times, but the beauty of this site is that it's so big and there are so many places to hide that they're never going to catch you. Was it worth visiting? For sure. It feels like I've ticked another one off the list and the murals and size of the place really are the redeeming elements to an otherwise bland and fooked Cold War derp. Will it be worth visiting in the future? I very much doubt it. I think within a few months it will have had it, sadly. That said, I don't think the bunkers are going anywhere at least, so I'll keep an eye on them with regards to internal access when I pass by in future. My photos don't do any justice to the scale of the place. For that a drone would definitely be useful. The videos probably give more of an idea of the 'geography' of it all. Anyway on with the photos... Rubbish dump. The Soviets very often dumped their rubbish in pits. This is evident all over East Germany. We found old gas masks, NBC overshoes, milk churns, boot polish, the lot! We bumped into a super-bait, full camo clad German and his missus in this building. Steps in the cinema. One of many small, buried buildings in the woods. Writing on the door. Warhead bunker. Bunged up door. Didn't seem worth digging out as all the other doors were welded from the other side it seemed. Lenin mural... More murals... Videos. Includes other assorted East German and Polish derps from the past couple of months. May contain the odd angry Gopnik and Fietsopa quote or two. Ace couple of weekends all-in-all. Big ups and thanks to DD for providing decent company and lulz. Thanks for looking, SJ.
  2. That moment when you turn on your computer and nothing happens.... And its a case of oh heck It has a bloody Virus big time... So a quick phonecall to my buddy the next county over and he says drop it off in the morning and he will have it sorted. So I decided to take the camera as that is always a great way to pass a few hours.. I decided I would go and have a look for this ROC post. It was not to hard to find after getting out of the car and looking around in a muddy field that was nicely overgrown. I had not seen anything pop up online from this so thought it had to be looked at, and with it being in the middle of nowhere and attached to a live private airfield I was hoping it would be in good condition. I opened the hatch and was greeted by a scene from arachnophobia. So I lowered my camera bag down first to clear the way and then climbed down. I was a bit gutted when I got inside and it was rather bare, but also glad that it had not come a cropper to one of their normal ends. What was inside and had not been cleared was still in good condition, and it had also attracted a few field mice that had got stuck inside. So I took the few obligatory photos and popped up the top to get a few more. The Locking bar was missing, the lock was also missing and had been cut, and a few of the fittings from on the surface were also damaged. All things considered it was nice way to spend a few hours on a damp midweek day. Images 2,3,4,7 and 8 were taken using the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 A HISTORY OF THE AIRFIELD IT IS LOCATED ON Beccles aerodrome was completed in August 1942 and opened in 1943. It was constructed under the direction of the London-based company Holland, Hannen & Cubitt and had three concrete runways built to the specifications of a Class A bomber airfield. The main runway was a good 1,800 metres (6,000 feet) long and 50 metres (150 feet) wide. There were fifty loop-shaped aircraft dispersal points each designed to accommodate one or two heavy bombers, and two T2 hangars. The airfield was intended for the use of the USAAF (United States Army Air Forces) Eighth Army Air Force but was never used by the Americans. In its heyday (December 1944) the aerodrome dispersed campsites accommodated 2,667 male and 27 female personnel. The station, which was locally always known as Ellough airfield and in official documents is referred to as RAF Beccles [Ellough], was the last to be built in Suffolk during the war and the most easterly aerodrome in wartime England. It was designated USAAF Station 132. The USAAF, however, had no use for the base and in the summer of 1944 it was transferred to RAF Bomber Command, and a few months later to Coastal Command. In September and October 1944, the 618th Squadron, flying De Havilland Mosquito aircraft, used the main runway at night for practicing the dropping of "Highball" bombs, the smaller version of the "Bouncing Bomb". The 618th was the sister squadron to the 617th Squadron, the famous "Dambusters". The tests were carried out under great secrecy and the level of security was heightened with the arrival of a Special Police unit in early September. From October 1944 to October 1945, the base was used as an Air-Sea Rescue (ASR) post. The squadrons involved were the 280th, flying Warwick aircraft, No. 278 Squadron flying Walrus floatplanes and No. 119 Squadron, flying Albacores. No. 279 squadron, flying Warwicks and Supermarine Sea Otters, the last biplane in RAF service, used the base for anti-shipping duties. The airfield was closed to military flying in the winter of 1945 and transferred to care and maintenance under the control of RAF Langham. All medical supplies held at the small base hospital were handed over to the local hospital in Beccles. The accommodation was used by the Royal Navy for training reservists and for a short period the airfield was designated HMS Hornbill II. In 1946, a Prisoner of War camp was opened and up to 1,000 German prisoners were held there. The Officers' and Sergeants' quarters located in College Lane were used for housing some of these prisoners, who worked as labourers in the vicinity. By the time the camp was closed in 1948 the airfield was disused and the land had returned to agriculture, but in the 1950s a De Havilland Vampire jet fighter running low on fuel made an emergency landing on the flying field; the hot efflux from the aircraft's jet pipe set the grass on fire. The Vampire was the last military aircraft to land here. Many of the temporary buildings located on the various dispersed sites, all of which were located to the west of the flying field, were dismantled or demolished, and most of the runways have since been broken up for aggregate. The airfield's Watch office was pulled down in 2009 due to it having fallen derelict after many years of neglect. It was located on the edge of a field to the south of Benacre Road. The underground Battle Headquarters (BHQ) situated in the near vicinity, which for many years had been inaccessible due to being flooded, was filled in at around the same time. The only structure still in place is a brick-built blast shelter that adjoined the Watch office in the north-east. ROC POSTS Royal Observer Corps Monitoring Posts are underground structures all over the United Kingdom, constructed as a result of the Corps' nuclear reporting role and operated by volunteers during the Cold War between 1955 and 1991. In all but a very few instances the posts were built to a standard design consisting of a 14-foot-deep access shaft, a toilet/store and a monitoring room.[1] The most unusual post was the non-standard one constructed in a cellar within Windsor Castle. A third of the total number of posts were closed in 1968 during a reorganisation and major contraction of the ROC. Several others closed over the next 40 years as a result of structural difficulties i.e. persistent flooding, or regular vandalism. The remainder of the posts were closed in 1991 when the majority of the ROC was stood down following the break-up of the Communist Bloc. Many have been demolished or adapted to other uses but the majority still exist, although in a derelict condition. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  3. Evening all, As part of our 35 man tour in April this year, one of the early morning stops on our first day was at this village on the outskirts of the powerplant and within the exclusion zone. The Chernobyl contamination was divided into four exclusion zones based on radiation amounts. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone with highest contamination is officially uninhabited. In truth, over 2,000 elderly villagers illegally resettled their homes and farms inside the Zone. Today nearly 400 remain. More than 3,000 workers manage the Zone, living in Chernobyl town during 4-day and 15-day shifts. Another 3,800 personnel commute daily to work at the Chernobyl plant from their new home in Slavutych. After the accident in 1986, over 160 towns and villages nearby were evacuated. Many were demolished, some were simply abandoned. This village that is beyond the main zone of exclusion where radiation fell but evacuation was not mandatory. In Ukraine, this included over two thousand villages. The accident and indirect consequences continue to affect these residents physically, economically, socially and psychologically. The questions remain - Why do people stay? No alternatives or a sense of duty or because this is their home? On wandering around in the time we had, there were a few villagers who came out to see what was going on as someone attempted to access their home. Just goes to show that people are resilient and decide to plod on, regardless of the situation. One had cattle and crops in the garden. Some of the photos. Thanks for looking in.
  4. Evening all, A selection of images from several of the kindergartens and middle schools that we managed to get around on our 2 full days in the zone in Pripyat. also included a few from the music school. Hard to believe that some of the items still remain 28 years since the disaster. Named for the nearby Pripyat River, Pripyat was founded on 4 February 1970, the ninth nuclear city in the Soviet Union, for the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. It was officially proclaimed a city in 1979, and had grown to a population of 49,360 before being evacuated a few days after the 26 April 1986 Chernobyl disaster. Though Pripyat is located within the administrative district of Ivankiv Raion, the abandoned city now has a special status within the larger Kiev Oblast (province), being administered directly from Kiev. Pripyat is also supervised by Ukraine's Ministry of Emergencies, which manages activities for the entire Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Access to Pripyat, unlike cities of military importance, was not restricted before the disaster as nuclear power stations were seen by the Soviet Union as safer than other types of power plants. Nuclear power stations were presented as being an achievement of Soviet engineering, where nuclear power was harnessed for peaceful projects. The slogan "peaceful atom" (mirnyj atom) was popular during those times. The original plan had been to build the plant only 25 km (16 mi) from Kiev, but the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, among other bodies, expressed concern about it being too close to the city. As a result, the power station and Pripyat were built at their current locations, about 100 km (62 mi) from Kiev. After the disaster the city of Pripyat was evacuated in two days. Lots more to come but this gives a flavour of what I've processed so far. Hopefully will get a different set of photos from the next trip and visit some more of the schools in the city. Thanks for looking in.
  5. My first report in a very long time here, so I thought I would begin with my best ever explore. I hope you enjoy it. Visited with a group people I met over the internet, who aren't on any forums. A bit of history about the site: Purpose: The British government's alternative seat of power in the event of a nuclear strike on the UK. Conceived: 1956 Completed: 1961 Decommissioned: 1991 Declassified: 2004 Districts: 22 Depth: 60-100 feet below ground. Dimensions: 1km long and 200 meters across. Area: 35 acres. Transport: A fleet of battery powered buggies navigated 10 miles of tunnel. Inhabitants: 4000 government ministers and civil servants including the Prime Minister, Cabinet Office, local and national government agencies, intelligence and security advisors and domestic support staff. Facilities: Infirmary, bakery, laundry, two large kitchens and serving areas, telephone exchange, store rooms, office space, living accommodation, maintenance areas and workshops and an area for the storage and charging of the bunker's electric buggies.
  6. Big thanks to TBm and Northern Ninja for cracking this and the intel............ Explored with UrbanGinger,Stealth and Obscurity.. No mishaps or hassles with getting to the bunker other than a man in a red van with his dog being nosey so no grand stories of our escapades im afreaid..(yay i hear you say no waffling shit) Some history from wicki American military forces were first stationed at High Wycombe in 1942, shortly after the United States' formal entrance into World War II. So urgent was the action that Wycombe Abbey School, situated on the land that would become the station, was given three weeks to find new facilities; failure in this effort led to the school's closing, until the independent girl's school was returned by the US in 1945. In 1952, the station, formerly known as Daws Hill House, welcomed US forces again. The following years of the Cold War saw fluctuation in the base's importance. Approximately 800 personnel were stationed there when, in 1969, their numbers were reduced, so that, in the early 1970s, only a small group remained for upkeep of facilities. Then, in 1975, activity escalated, revitalising the station's importance to the American military in Europe. Its nuclear bunker, with 23,000 square feet (2,100 square meters) of space, housed high-tech equipment for the direction of nuclear bombers and guided missiles. Use of the station was reduced with the end of the Cold War; by 1992, US Defense personnel at RAF Daws Hill numbered fewer than 350. In 2002, the UK Ministry of Defence proposed to close RAF Daws Hill some years in the future, turning the 50 acres (20 ha) of land over to other public and private use and relocating American Naval personnel and activities to other locations near London, particularly RAF Uxbridge.[2] The plan apparently fizzled, however, when the US Navy voiced its preference to remain. High Wycombe, desiring to build at least 400 new houses by 2011 for its growing population, considered the land ideal for up to 600 houses; but nearby residents also rejected the proposal because of the changes that it would entail, including increased traffic on relatively quiet roads. The station was home, between 1971 and 2007, to the London Central Elementary High School, part of the Department of Defense Dependents Schools, with pupils in grades K?12. Also at Daws Hill are 70 housing units for American personnel and their families. Other facilities include warehouses and those for vehicle maintenance, as well as support buildings for persons who lived and worked at the base, such as a bank, a post office, a bowling alley, sports grounds and buildings, a small exchange, an automobile refueling station, and a social club On with My pics from our outing. Sorry its a bit pic heavy but its a huge site and theres a lot of bits of machinery all over the place as well as vast empty rooms.
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