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Found 9 results

  1. Explored with Lost Explorer, The Stig and a non-member History The original buildings on the site of the Selly Oak Hospital were for the King’s Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and among many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. The rising costs of poor relief had become a national problem and the new act sought to address this. Throughout the country, parishes were formed into larger unions with the power to raise money from rates on property to pay for the poor. King’s Norton Poor Law Union was formed from the parishes of Harborne, Edgbaston, King’s Norton, Northfield and Beoley. Each of these five parishes had individual workhouses. These were replaced in 1872 by the new, much larger one at Selly Oak. It was built to accommodate 200 inmates. Central supervision by the Poor Law Commissioners in London ensured that all workhouses were administered similarly by a set of rules and regulations. How humanely these were interpreted depended entirely upon each local board of Poor Law Guardians, who were local worthies. They were elected annually and gave their services voluntarily. The aim of the Poor Law Amendment Act was to deny any form of relief except through admission to the workhouse. Generally it was assumed that the able-bodied poor could find work and if they did not then they should be forced to work within the confines of the workhouse. It was thought that if conditions in the workhouse were really bad then the poor would be deterred from seeking relief. However, by the late 18th century it became apparent that the majority of workhouse inmates were the most vulnerable people in society; the young, the old, the chronic sick and the mentally ill. Various Acts of Parliament ruled that separate provision should be made for children and the mentally ill. The sick poor were to be accommodated in separate infirmary blocks. These were often built adjacent to the workhouses and were the forerunners of many great hospitals of today. King's Norton Union Infirmary, 1897 At Selly Oak, a separate infirmary was built in 1897 at a cost of £52,000. It was the subject of much heated debate as the original estimate had been £18,000. It was a light, clean and practical building, and generally a source of much pride. The Guardians took great care and gathered information from other infirmaries to ensure that the final design, put out to a competition and won by Mr. Daniel Arkell, was up-to-date and modern. The Infirmary accommodated about 250 patients in eight Nightingale wards and smaller side wards and rooms. There was also provision for maternity cases. Between the two main pavilions were a central administration block, kitchens, a laundry, a water tower, doctors’ rooms and a telephone exchange. There was no operating theatre or mortuary and, in the workhouse tradition, the internal walls were not plastered, painted brick being considered good enough for the sick paupers. The workhouse and infirmary were separated by a high dividing wall and were run as separate establishments. In the early 1900’, the population of the King’s Norton Union increased dramatically. In 1907, extensions to the infirmary and the workhouse made provision for the growing numbers of poor people. This doubled the size of the main hospital building. The Woodlands Nurses’ Home was built at the same time to accommodate forty nurses. A small operating room was added to the infirmary. There was a resident nursing staff of eight trained nurses and nineteen probationers who were supervised by the Matron. In 1911, King’s Norton, no longer a rural area, left Worcestershire and became part of the City of Birmingham. The Birmingham Union was formed from the unions of King’s Norton, Aston and Birmingham. The King’s Norton Workhouse Infirmary was renamed Selly Oak Hospital. Over the next two decades facilities improved with the addition of an operating theatre, plastering of internal walls, and the introduction of physiotherapy, pathological and X-ray services. Children's Ward, date unknown Attitudes to the poor changed gradually and measures to relieve poverty, such as old age pensions and National Insurance, were introduced before The Great War. By 1930, the administrative structure of the Poor Law was finally dismantled. Selly Oak Hospital and the Workhouse, renamed Selly Oak House, came under the administration of Birmingham City Council. Selly Oak House was administered separately and used for the care of the elderly chronic sick. Selly Oak Hospital continued to grow, new operating theatres were added in 1931, and the biochemistry and pathology laboratories opened in 1934. Nurses had been trained at Selly Oak since 1897, but it was not until 1942 that the School of Nursing was opened. In 1948, when the National Health Service was introduced, Selly Oak Hospital and Selly Oak House were amalgamated. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010. On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall and contribute to an online memories website. It was announced on 24 February 2015 that contracts had been exchanged for the sale and redevelopment of residential housing on the site. The site already had outline planning permission for 650 homes. Iraq Veterans at Selly Oak, 2009 Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the bestburns units in the country. It was also home to the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans.The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war. A report published by the House of Commons Defence Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign and praised the clinical care provided to military patients. Explore With Stig and his Mrs visiting the Midlands again, this was an oppotuntiy not to be missed. In the morning we heading straight to Selly Oak. We started in the morgue, which to my astonishment still had two of the three slabs. After the usual escapades, we continued to the main block. After the Out-patient and X-Ray Departments, we entered the A&E waiting room. After a few snaps, myself and Lost Explorer headed forward ahead of the other two. As we approached some double doors to continue down the corridor, a hi-viz jacket came flying through the doors. The 'security guard' then tried to wrestle LE to the ground and take his camera. LE obviously objected to this request and held his camera towards me, then a second guy(looking like your typical Saab owner) came running in and tried to grab my camera. I politely told him that I would not adear to his request. At this point Mr and Mrs Stig came through wandering what the fuck we were shouting about. We all agreed to place our cameras on opposite side of the corridor from where we were instructed to stand. After a breif chat with mission control, the 'security guard'(who had a hilarious lisp) marched us towards the main entrance. As they took our details, Stig requested to see our lipse-stricken security guard's ID. "I left it at home". Following Stig informing him on the fact that he is legally required to wear his ID, we were ordered to go. Really narked off with myself about getting caught, again. But I'm glad I was with people who could keep their cool. If anyone wants to visit here, be wary. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) Cheers for Looking
  2. The Visits Each explore of this place has been very different, ranging from really tight security and tricky access back in May to far easier in September and then now the place getting more and more trashed by the day. Only one building I've never been managed to get into was the Centre for Defence Medicine building which has been very tightly sealed every time I've been but never say never I suppose. Hope you like the pics. The History In 1911, King’s Norton – no longer a rural area – left Worcestershire and became part of the City of Birmingham. The Birmingham Union was formed from the unions of King’s Norton, Aston and Birmingham. The King’s Norton Workhouse Infirmary was renamed Selly Oak Hospital. Over the next two decades facilities improved with the addition of an operating theatre, plastering of internal walls, and the introduction of physiotherapy, pathological and X-ray services. By 1929 there were seven full-time members of the medical staff, and the medical residence was built at this time. Attitudes to the poor changed gradually and measures to relieve poverty, such as old age pensions and National Insurance, were introduced before the First World War By 1930, the administrative structure of the Poor Law was finally dismantled. Selly Oak Hospital and the Workhouse, renamed Selly Oak House, came under the administration of Birmingham City Council. Selly Oak House was administered separately and used for the care of the elderly chronic sick. Selly Oak Hospital continued to grow, new operating theatres were added in 1931, and the biochemistry and pathology laboratories opened in 1934. Nurses had been trained at Selly Oak since 1897, but it was not until 1942 that the School of Nursing was opened. In 1948, when the National Health Service was introduced, Selly Oak Hospital and Selly Oak House were amalgamated. Since then many changes to the site have resulted in the institution we see today.
  3. History​ The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening. It was announced on 24 February 2015 that contracts had been exchanged for the sale and redevelopment of residential housing on the site. The site already had outline planning permission for 650 homes. The Visit​ I know this place has been done to death! After trying to get in a few months back and being busted before getting in we attempted again so this visit was with Redhunter, LoocyLoo and a non Member. These images are from my first visit, this place was pretty cool tbh but the pikeys have got there hands on it so ceilings have been pulled down and wiring stripped from the walls the place has been trashed over the past couple of weeks but all in all its pretty easy to get in and the morgue has not been touched by pikeys yet so thats still worth a little look... ​ Pictures
  4. History. The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King's Norton Union Workhouse, featured in the image below. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601. At Selly Oak, a separate infirmary was built in 1897 at a cost of £52,000. It was the subject of much heated debate as the original estimate had been £18,000. It was a light, clean and practical building, and generally a source of much pride. The guardians took great care and gathered information from other infirmaries to ensure that the final design, put out to a competition and won by Mr. Daniel Arkell, was up-to-date and modern. The infirmary accommodated about 250 patients in eight Nightingale wards and smaller side wards and rooms. There was also provision for maternity cases. Between the two main pavilions were a central administration block, kitchens, a laundry, a water tower, doctors' rooms and a telephone exchange. There was no operating theatre or mortuary and, in the workhouse tradition, the internal walls were not plastered, painted brick being considered good enough for the sick paupers. The workhouse and infirmary were separated by a high dividing wall and were run as separate establishments. The hospital grew in size with more buildings built, including the morgue, theatres & and a few laboratories. The hospital closed in 2012, due to the newer hospital been built with more facilities, much larger then the original and a more modern. Shorty after the closer of the Hospital, the buildings have stood intact and even still had working lights in some of the buildings, But after time it became a hot spot due to the amount of copper and materials left inside, this lead to people setting up camp on site and completely stripping most of the buildings back. In the past few months the main hospital has been looking in it's worst state, with corridors you can't even walk down due to the extent of damage caused. Currently the site is up for demolition, where 650 houses will be built within the site the hospital once was. Slowly but surely you can see signs of work been done, footings and old pipe work is been dug up ready for new piping etc. It'll be sad to see this place go, but things have to move on. The visit Visited with @BrainL. We'd previously done the main hospital and the morgue and we wanted to adventure over to the other side of the hospital. We walked around and got into the admin block, x-ray block, outpatients and a few more ( can't remember names) I wish I done this a few months back, because once inside it was pretty much bare, big piles of " scrap" had been assembled and wasn't the same. Anyways we both seen things we hadn't before and we was very chuffed with the result. Thanks for looking
  5. Seems as if the tour bus is in town, and I'm the last off:D The History: I'm sure everyone knows already, and most people won't bother reading (I wouldn't blame you) but have some history anyway.. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening On the morning of 23 May 2010 a ‘Service of Thanks’ was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to “Take a Trip Down Memory Laneâ€, sign a memory wall [3] and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganization was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the best burns units in the country. It was also home to the Royal Center for Defense Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans. The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war. There were also difficulties when Jeremy Clarkson went to the hospital to give gifts to the wounded serviceman. A report published by the House of Commons Defense Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign and praised the clinical care provided to military patients. The Explore: Now it's not often I get to say this, but I actually got a lay in on an explore - 7am! But we were up and out sharpish, and heading over to Selly. We got there, and after pondering several entry methods for a while, we finally decided. Except, it involved a hell of a lot of bushes, brambles and a few stinging nettles, but eventually we were in! We were heading towards the morgue when we heard voices.. had we been spotted already?! Thankfully not, and it was other explorers. Quick introductions were made, and after a stupid climb through a very awkward entry point we were in! Decided to have a look round the main hospital after, and eventually to the other buildings.. big mistake! Within about 3 minutes we'd tripped 4 alarms. We snapped a few quick pictures, and made an exit. Good timing really, as by the time we'd got back to the car and were heading home, police were all over it.. lucky escape:thumb Better get on with some pictures.. As always, thanks for taking the time to view this. Cheers guys
  6. Decided it was time to get out exploring again so sorted out a visit to Selly Oak as its been on my list for ages. Met up with two other explorers on the day and had a good look around. Getting into the mortuary is a bit risky but so worth it! History The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King's Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening. On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Pictures Mortuary Outpatients X-Ray Main Hospital More pictures up here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarthomas/sets/72157654300167915
  7. After what seems like forever without an explore (in reality it's only been 3 weeks) I finally got let loose on the abandonments again! By 9.30am myself and OverArch had racked up a trio of fails in quick succession so it looked to all intents and purposes like today was heading down the toilet. Heading to Selly Oaks was rather glum, it was grey and raining and not very nice but after some dumb luck and bumping into a trio of other explorers the five of us located an access point which proved utterly undignified for nearly all of us, especially me as per usual. We went our separate ways once inside and only bumped into each other a couple more times, the place is huge and keeps going on and on and on. If you guys (and girl) are reading this, thanks for the company And the extra special icing on the cake was managing to get into the mortuary, after spotting a pair of other explorers attempting to access it we realised what we had to do to get in, to say it's slightly sketchy is an understatement but all five of us were in after a bit of lateral thinking and more dumb luck. Definitely the nicest mortuary I've seen and with some lovely decayed laboratories on the upper floor as well. Over four hours later we made it back to the car, pleased that the day hadn't been a total appalling failure. It's been a while since I explored any site of this size let alone a hospital of this size and despite it's largely modernised appearance I rather enjoyed it. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653758432252
  8. Hi all, Here's my second report on this page, Trip to selly oak who I explored with a couple of members. Lets start it off with some history of theplace. History. The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King’s Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital.It was announced on 24 February 2015 that contracts had been exchanged for the sale and redevelopment of residential housing on the site. The site already had outline planning permission for 650 homes The visit One very early Sunday morning, after been filled with coffee and a bacon sarnie, and meeting up with a few members we got into the hospital, we firstly started in the outer buildings, which where very plain and boring, So we quickly moved onto the main hospital, soon as we got in we bumped into Perjury Saint , scared the crap out of us lol, sound bloke though. This was my second visit within selly oak and I still can't believe how much i'd missed on my last trip. Place is just so big, so many corridors and wards to go to. We went a good 5/6 hours in there and I still don't think we explored it all, Unfortunately we didn't get into the morgue, even though rumours say it's been knocked down and sealed up. Hope you enjoy! flooded with pictures lol, I couldn't decided.
  9. Not many pics from here most of them came out dark and wonky so here are a few half decent ones Visited with Fat Panda, Hamtagger and a couple non members, Good day out with good company Cheers for looking
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