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Found 13 results

  1. It's been months sense I got out and explored an abandoned location. There wasn't much left here, but it still felt great to be back on that horse again.
  2. Abandoned Paper Mill, UK Visited with: Alex Visit Date: April 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. My Visit I had been wanting to visit the mill for some time, however, I kept pushing this one aside for a rainy day. Eventually myself & Alex decided it was time.... This would be my first visit and Alex's second. So, early on a soggy, wet, rainy and very windy April morning we set off to what would turn out to be one of the best & most enjoyable explores I have been on. The entry to the mill I knew was going to be tricky because Alex had told me the way in when planning the visit. Lots of climbing was needed and the main thing I was thinking was do not rush and avoid any areas that look a little sketchy. It worked and we both made it in without any issues. Now, I knew the mill was a large site after seeing many other photos from people who had been here and within a few minutes of dropping in the scale of this place became a reality! I am no expert in the process of making paper so I will only state what I have read as to what the machinery was used for. I think the yellow machines in this photo fed the pipes in the following photos. I spent a good amount of time in this room due to all the pipework shooting off in different directions. I love lines and angles and this area had plenty to go at. From what I have read the pipes were for feeding pulp into machines on a lower floor. It makes sense as you can see the pipes attached to the ceiling feeding the pipes on the other side of the room that dissapear into the floor. The mill has plenty of large rooms that could have been used for many things such as storage & packaging. Here are a few photos of these spaces. It is always good to get a feel for the people who worked in these places and when you find the brew / changing rooms it kind of brings you back to reality. People once worked here, this was their income for paying the bills, but sadly no more. The different characters that would have been in these rooms over the years and the stories they have told. Does anyone think that this was the male changing room! And no, not because it is messy.... Situated in the middle of the main working areas we found the brew room which consisted of two floors for people to sit and relax whilst on their breaks. A shower room and another changing room are situated off to the side but I never took a photo, why I hear you ask... because my brain gave out on me and I forgot. I remember thinking that it must have been very noisy in here due to the fact that it is surrounded on all sides by large machinery. All I know about these machines is that they were used for rolling the paper. The room is crammed from wall to wall with machinery with only a central isle to walk down. Do you remember earlier in the report that I said the pulp was fed through the pipes and down to machines on a lower floor? Well these are the machines that was fed the pulp. What happened to the pulp at this stage I have absolutely no idea. The room was very dark (and hard to photograph) and I remember when entering feeling like I had been taken back in time to the industrial revolution. Lots of metal on show, dirt, pipes & strange looking machines it was very surreal. I can imagine this area being very hot and noisy with lots of sweaty dirty workers going about their tasks. As well as all the machines there was also a good amount of office space here. Most was very badly decayed or trashed but I did find this room rather interesting. Ok so back to the working areas... This is the largest area we came across on the visit, lots of different areas within one floor all working together in what you could call a production line. Again I got a surreal feeling here due to the fact that at one time this place would have been bustling with people and noise. Now though, nothing, nothing other than the sounds of our footsteps and the rain hitting the roof. Tucked away in the corner of this area we found three forklifts parked up. They look in very good working order and I am sure if you had the keys they would start up. The final photo is of an area where one of the end results is stacked up on pallets and either moved to storage or loaded onto wagons. There is still some paper stacked on pallets that will have come down the conveyors as you can see in the photo. Behind me is two very large shutter doors that open to a loading area. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Lotus Hall aka Cuckoo Hall on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/119757413@N07/ Final thoughts To me having a fantastic location to see is only 50% of what makes a good trip the other is great company and this day had both, I loved every minute we spent here. There was so much to see and with every room being different it allowed your mind to try and figure out and imagine what the area was used for and the communal areas made you think of the people who worked here..... To me that is what exploring is all about! With the size of this place I am sure myself & Alex will have missed some areas and I would love to revisit here at some point. The mill instantly became one of my favorite locations that I have been lucky enough to see and rightly so. Finally, thanks to my good Friend Alex for the company as always. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  3. The Visit Very early morning start for this one, having tried before a few times before and being caught by secca, police and just plain failing to find access this time I was successful and managed to find the way in after some crazy climbing. Have to say it was worth the wait and bother though The History The death of the Crompton brothers left the mill ownerless and the succession was offered to Robert Fletcher, the mill’s manager at the time. Fletcher had risen through the ranks, to first become the manager of the bleaching department and later the whole mill. Following Fletcher’s death on 17th May 1865, his sons John and James took over. They in turn passed down the mill to their sons, also named John and James. In 1897 the mill was incorporated as a limited company. In 1921 a second mill opened, located at Greenfield, near Oldham. The mill specialised in the production of cigarette paper and at its height employed 1000 people to run seven paper machines. These machines produced only a fraction of the paper the later, much larger machines could produce. Upon closure the mill had three machines – two very similar lines from 19XX and a huge modern 1996 addition. By 1986 the company was making a loss and was purchased by the Melton Medes Conglomerate who turned the company around and started to make a profit once again. However by 2001 the company was once again failing and the decision was made to close the Stoneclough Mill. Some people were transferred to the Greenfield mill, but the company could not sustain the increasing loses and was forced into receivership. The mill was closed down overnight. The mill at Stoneclough has been demolished. To this day the mill at Greenfield still remains how it was the day it closed. Streams of paper remain inside the machines, connected to the rolls of finished product at the end of the production lines – a time capsule from a bygone era.
  4. Had the chance to revisit everyone's favourite power station a few months ago. Yep, still doable! It was good to get in and grab some shots with the lights on. Nothing you haven't seen before, with the possible exception of some original Control Room Feeder Log Sheets we found in there - Dated November 1977 1. The huge control room 2. Control panels 3. Central command desks 4. Control desk 5. Control desks 6. Control desk 7. Central command desk 8. Mission control! 9. Comms system and papers 10. Papers on the desk 11. Feeder Log Sheets 12. Original paperwork from 1977 13. Synchroscope 14. Amp meter detail 15. Power Factor Meter 16. Back of control panels And in case you are wondering what the rest of the place looks like now - here's a crappy phone shot showing the scaffolding. The entire centre area was crammed full with more scaff than you possibly imagine! 17. Scaffolding inside turbine hall
  5. The history of Robert Fletcher & sons paper mill dates back to the industrial revolution. The company was once owned by Ralph Crompton and Nephews, producers and bleachers of paper. Their first mill was located in Stoneclough, Manchester. The death of the Crompton brothers left the mill ownerless and the succession was offered to Robert Fletcher, the mill’s manager at the time. Fletcher had risen through the ranks, to first become the manager of the bleaching department and later the whole mill. Following Fletcher’s death on 17th May 1865, his sons John and James took over. They in turn passed down the mill to their sons, also named John and James. In 1897 the mill was incorporated as a limited company. In 1921 a second mill opened, located at Greenfield, near Oldham. The mill specialised in the production of cigarette paper and at its height employed 1000 people to run seven paper machines. These machines produced only a fraction of the paper the later, much larger machines could produce. Upon closure the mill had three machines – two very similar lines from 19XX and a huge modern 1996 addition. By 1986 the company was making a loss and was purchased by the Melton Medes Conglomerate who turned the company around and started to make a profit once again. However by 2001 the company was once again failing and the decision was made to close the Stoneclough Mill. Some people were transferred to the Greenfield mill, but the company could not sustain the increasing loses and was forced into receivership. The mill was closed down overnight. The mill at Stoneclough has been demolished. To this day the mill at Greenfield still remains how it was the day it closed. Streams of paper remain inside the machines, connected to the rolls of finished product at the end of the production lines – a time capsule from a bygone era. Wood Pulp Treatment and Preparation Paper starts off as wood bails which is turned into a pulp using machines, then bleached. The rolling machines The rolling machines form the pulp into sheets. Spooling Machines and Packing Area The sheets are fed onto reels and cut to size Offices and Staff Areas Newer Machine Room This huge machine was a later addition an is much more modern than the rest of the machinery.
  6. The company was founded as a straw-paper mill in 1859. After the sale in 1873, the production were extended in 1880. The houses for the workers emerged 1912. After the Second World War worked more than 300 employees in the paper mill. Each year, 15 to 20 papermakers were trained. Jobs were lost in 2001, last 115 employees still working in the factory. Finally it was closed in 2007 and demolished in 2011. The photos were taken during an eight-hour exploration five years ago, in April of 2010. Sorry for the many photos. But I wanted to show more, because it doesn't exist anymore. south plant - part one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
  7. The factory consists of a paper mill, a power plant and a boiler house. The oldest buildings date from the 19th century. The factory was finaly closed in the mid 90s. Last weekend I was there again with The_Raw, extreme_ironing and MiaroDigital. The state has unfortunately continued to deteriorate due to vandalism. In the control room, the phone was destroyed and an idiot distributed lubricating oil on the floor of the machine hall. In addition, from the small laboratory also disappeared different things. The following pics are a mix from my 4th and 5th re-visit in June 2014 (marked with *) and March 2015. So don't be surprised because the things described above on the photos are still intact / exist. 1* 2* 3 4 5* 6* 7* 8 9* 10* 11* 12 13 14 15 16 (To this perspective, I was inspired by a picture of Kalum_a.) 17* 18* 19* 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  8. A power plant from a former paper mill, which was closed in the 90s. I’ve visited this place four times, but most of my pictures aren’t processed yet. These photos are from July 2013, wich shows absolutely not everything from this big area. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  9. Back from the latest mini road trip with Lost aka Hector Scorn. We set off for a easy leisurely drive down the road with a quick stop in past a old asylum that is well under way to being demo'd, quite sad really but always good to see it one last time, pics of that will follow sometime. Off we set again to reach our destination and find a nearby spot to get some sleep for the night before hitting this derpy derp that has eluded me 3 times in the past. Parking up in a quiet car park I decided to camp it outside and went off to set up the tent, it was a bit windy, but wasn't too cold out. Getting into the tent, the wind picked up, I should've pitched my tent elsewhere, it was getting battered everywhere! The next problem was it turned out the car park we were in was a dogging car park, so whilst I was hidden away in a tent, Lost was being entertained by several cars throughout the night obvisously wanting a bit of promiscuous fun ahahahah! Early morning was soon around and after maybe only 2 hours total sleep we were packed up and off in search of my nemsis. Previous visits we had been caught by Secca, couldn't find a way in and found a fire engine there the last time. Not to be detered we made our way down a different route to the site, no Secca to be seen or heard, just the geese making lots of noise! After a good 40 minutes of searching we made eventually found a route in and with some difficutly navigated it. We were in, inside the derp that has been on my list for so long, but never been able to get done. Today would be different. Time was up, but I could've wandered around here for so much longer, this has to be one of the most under rated sites going about. Fantastic machinery left, not a lot of pikeyness going on and hardly any graffiti. To say I was impressed would be a huge understatement, this was everything I had dreamed it would be and sooo much more. Thanks for looking!
  10. This place is being dismantled very quickly so redevelopment work can begin. BIG thanks to Collingwood for sorting out a permission visit on this one History Paper making started at Stowford Mill 226 years ago, in 1787, on the same site as a corn mill, both using water from the River Erme as a source of power. Initially, paper was produced by hand, one sheet at a time from locally collected cotton rags and supplied to local customers. Half a century later, in 1837, the first paper making machine was installed to meet increasing demand for printing and writing papers. The arrival of the railway in Ivybridge in 1848 no doubt influenced Victorian entrepreneur John Allen’s decision to purchase the mill the following year. He set about re-building and expanding the mill, and by the mid 1860’s two larger paper machines had been installed. Over 300 people were employed, a significant percentage of the population of Ivybridge at the time. John Allen’s influence on Ivybridge extended beyond the paper mill, including building the Methodist church, houses for the employees, and the gas works. His descendents sold the mill in 1910, a few years before the First World War, and unfortunately, the business declined until the receiver took over in 1923. The following year, the fortunes of the mill were transformed when it became part of Portals, a larger papermaking company, which the current owners can trace links to. The mill flourished again, and as a result of specialising in the production of security and other watermarked papers, it continued to operate long after many other similar mills closed, with several generations of the same family working there. Paper production peaked both at Stowford Mill and in the UK in 2000, and has been in continued decline since, mainly as a result of changes in communications technology. During 2013, it was announced that production would be transferred to a larger mill in the Arjowiggins group in Scotland as part of consolidation plans to utilise excess capacity at the site, and as a result, Stowford Mill produced it’s last reel of Paper at the end of 2013. The site is currently being de-commissioned, and stripped, before redevelopment work can begin.
  11. Germany Another paper mill - 2014

    Hey, this paper mill was close for over 25 Years. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 23. 24. 25.
  12. Visited with Landie. Apologies for this being late, it's just me being lazy and putting it off until now. In another one of the adventures with me acting as a guide for him, we hit Fletcher's Paper Mill, safe in the knowledge that access was still there and it was (fairly) easy to do. We both love lots of rusty machinery too, so we couldn't go wrong. I'd already been here with Zotez, 4 months ago to the day we went; we were successful in getting in and not getting caught, but as soon as we were about to make our way into what I'm going to show you below, we heard banging on the shutters. I was well aware of the cunning security here, who have peepholes set up round the main building, ready to pounce on any unsuspecting explorers and catch them out. On the first visit we did spot security once on patrol and again loitering at the front gate whilst inside, who despite seeing us so close to the fence appeared nonchalant about us being in the next field; on the other hand, he wasn't stupid. He knew what our game was, and once we were in, I was adamant that he banged on the shutters to get us running like frightened rabbits caught in the headlights. We fell for it the first time, but not now. No sign of any security or activity whatsoever. So (without being too explicit and giving away where and how we got in) got inside, getting absolutely caked in grease. Foul! I didn't bother taking pictures of what I'd already seen again, so I took Landie round the bits I'd already seen. Onwards we went, making our way down to the bits every explorer comes here for. The pictures are a bit naff to be fair, so I apologise; I'm toying about with various photo editing software, so it's all very much hit and miss. I daren't had risked taking a photo from one end to the other, considering security had a carefully hidden peephole at the end. Luckily for us, however, I didn't see or hear a squeak from security. Not once. Landie apparently heard a woman's voice at some point, but I didn't. Who knows? Moving on, I was stunned to find more machinery at the back! Considering it's been closed since 2001, I was astounded to see this part in such (mostly, the offices were collapsing) immaculate condition! One thing that I really like about Fletcher's is just how intact the place is. Looking around, you'll find random machinery just left in place from the day it closed. One room, though locked tight, still had the computers and paperwork left on the desk, captured in time. That said, other areas have pretty much been taken over by nature with ferns and moss growing on the walls. Wonderful. Will I go back? Maybe; I'd be interested to know where the medical bay in this place is, and what lies in the buildings near the front of the site. But considering where security is, it might be a little too close for comfort... let's see. On a final note, from what I hear, we were really lucky to have not seen or heard security that day. We never got cocky and started making a hell of a noise when we went round, so that's probably why. On the other hand, Badbatz and co. went after we did, and had security on their tail from the moment they were in to the moment they left. Luckily they got away, but apparently they went inside in hot pursuit! Considering the amount of broken asbestos lying about, why they'd do this beggars belief! Has anyone been busted whilst inside? Love as always, TBM x
  13. Northern Trip Part 4 – Robert Fletchers Paper Mill (Oldham) So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. So we wake up on Day 2/3 of the Northern Trip fairly early to make the journey to Fletchers. I had heard about this for years and years on the urbex grapevine so much that I imagined it to be ruined inside after 12 years closure. Boy was I wrong. We parked up and headed straight for the factory. First impressions were that it was a little stripped, but as I ventured in I learned how time had really stood still in this place. Nearly everything remains inside and nature is taking over all around it. So much machinery just lost in time. ‘Fletchers mill’ or ‘Fletchers Paper Mill’ as its sometimes called is Situated in the picturesque valleys of east Oldham miles from anywhere. Robert Fletcher entered the firm as a young man in his twenties in the year 1830. He was very talented, which was not missed by his employers, so he soon became manager of the bleaching department and later managed the whole site. The Crompton family held Robert in high regard and Roger Crompton whom was the last of the brothers, left him both the principal trusteeship and the option of succeeding him in the firm. After Roger Crompton died, Robert Fletcher operated the mill with conspicuous ability and integrity for many years. He later died at Vale House in Stoneclough, in May 1865, and was succeeded by his sons John and James Fletcher. They in turn were followed by their sons, John Robert Fletcher and James Fletcher, who are well remembered by many of the sites former employees today. In 1897, the firm became a Limited Company. Many things have changed since those days. The Company grew from two hundred people; now the number including to about one thousand. The top wage in those days was 6½d. an hour. There were 7 paper machines which between them produced hardly anything compared to three modern units. Throughout the years, the firm continued to expand and to increase its volume of business. A relation for high quality, reliability and fine craftsmanship was steadily built up. A second mill, at Greenfield, near Oldham which we are reporting on here; was opened in 1921. This mill specialises in the manufacture of cigarette paper. Robert Fletchers owns several hundred of acres of land around Greenfield Mill, which supports a mixed farm. Towards the late 90’s the two mills of Robert Fletcher & Son Ltd started to struggle. A combination of the increased cost of wood pulp and energy put massive financial strain on the firm. In between 1997 and 1999, the mills turnover halved as did the shareholder funds. In 2000 in an effort to save the business going to the wall resulted in the closure of the original Fletchers Stoneclough mill and 120 job losses resulted from the closure although 50 new jobs would be created at the current Greenfield site. This was short-lived and the company continued to spiral into financial ruin and in July 2001 several suppliers and creditors formally applied to wind up the company and resulted in the closure of the Greenfield site. To this day the site stands empty. Lost in time, everything left behind. Nature is taking over the place. Again; please excuse the lens wobble DHL certainly got everywhere. R.I.P. Buddy More At: Robert Fletcher Smoking Paper Factory - a set on Flickr Northern Trip Part 5 – Rossendale Hospital
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