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Found 18 results

  1. Germany Small pottery - [visit 05/2017

    A small pottery in east germany... 1. Kleine Tonfabrik 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Kleine Tonfabrik 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Kleine Tonfabrik 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Kleine Tonfabrik 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  2. History T.G.Green & Co Ltd originally operated from the village of Church Gresley, South Derbyshire between 1864 and 2007. More famous for their blue and white striped 'Cornish Kitchen Ware' produced from the early 1920's (then known as 'E-Blue') the pottery produced many hundreds of patterns from Yellow wares, Victorian transfer prints, colourful hand painted Art Nouveau & vibrant enamelled Art Deco patterns, Wartime utility pottery, avant garde Retro designs and many well known Brewery wares, employing up to 1,000 local staff at the height of production. Now, sadly, the old pottery site lays in ruins, the land under private ownership, never likely to ever see production again, the last of the South Derbyshire potteries has gone, although as it nears its 100th anniversary the traditional Cornishware is still manufactured and sold through a new T.G.Green & Co Ltd. Explore This is somewhere I have wanted to visit for some time so pretty pleased we eventually got around to doing it. Visited with @hamtagger. We got here and spent a little while just venturing round the site, there was a bit of activity from the far side but from what I could see there are various parts of the site being used. Not a hugely massive site but we spent quite a number of hours here. I really loved this place. Although a bit late on getting here and missing out on a few bits I have seen in various other reports there was still enough here to see and the decay is so much more established which made everything much more photogenic. Well worth a trip if you havent already. It was quite nice to see some finished products So, on with the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 One of the companies they supplied to 15 16 17 18 19 Thanks for looking!
  3. The Explore Last explore of the day this one and not a bad one at all, as with lots of places I've seen lately I think we were a good few years to late for this one. Still a really interesting explore though and gives a real insight into an industry that was huge in that area at one time.. The History The Falcon Works Hanley, was owned by J. H. Weatherby & Sons Ltd who established a works on site in 1891. The works originally specialized in earthenware but later went on to produce fine porcelain. The former extant hovel kiln most likely dates from the 1890s, although the inner kiln has undoubtedly been replaced many times since this date and is most likely mid 20th Century. Originally the works had 5 kilns, but 3 where relocated to the south of the site in 1906 when the firm expanded. During this expansion the front range was added providing a new facade to the main street. Before the construction of the Potteries Way, the street was the main road north out of Hanely and was lined with many small potteries. The firm continued to grow slowly between and after the wars, first branching into hotelwares, then later collectables. By the 1970s the firms expansion was hindered by planning control and by 2000 the works finally closed. At its height the works employed 200, by 2000 it employed 10.
  4. Explored with Lost Explorer, The Wombat and a non-member History The Falcon Works Hanley, was owned by J. H. Weatherby & Sons Ltd who established a works on site in 1891. The works originally specialized in earthenware but later went on to produce fine porcelain. The former extant hovel kiln may date from the 1890s. The inner kiln has probably been renewed a few times since, and is likely to be dated mid 20th Century. Originally the works had 5 kilns, but 3 were relocated to the southern end of the site in 1906, when the firm expanded. Included within this expansion, the front of the site was added providing a new façade to the main street. Before the construction of Potteries Way, the street(now called Old Town Road) was the main road north out of Hanely and was lined with many small potteries. The firm continued to grow slowly between and after the wars, first branching into hotelwares, then later collectables. By the 1970s the firm’s expansion was hindered by planning control and by 2000 the works finally closed. At its height the works employed 200, by 2000 it employed 10. Explore This was the second explore of the day, and turned out to be our final success as well. Really enjoyed this, nice to see somewhere which hasn't been destroyed by kids, offering nature the oppotunity to take hold. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) Cheer for Looking
  5. UK TG Green's Pottery - 2015

    Hey OS. This ones a pretty old UK location but it's still just as great, the decay and reclamation here is really what makes it, not to mention all of the stuff left behind. Visited on a few occasions with AndyK! and others. Photos: Not as well covered here as in other reports. But I hope you get the picture Cheers.
  6. Abandoned Pottery Factory - Sept 2015

    During our latest trip to France we visited an old factory where pottery etc were made. Although the place is abandoned for a while and most of the factory is empty, one building is (in urbex terms) well preserved. The combination of wood, sunlight, beautiful rooms and left pottery made this one of my favorite locations.
  7. Evening:D The Explore: Found myself up north this weekend, and the first place we visited was TG Green. After fighting through some brambles we found ourselves inside - it was a relativity relaxed explore overall, just wondering round at our leisure until we saw a jeep go by.. upstairs in the canteen, we saw it drive past again. security doing a patrol we thought? nope.. just a guy checking some animal traps, thankfully he was off as soon as he'd done that, and we slipped out the way we'd came with no bother at all. Loved this explore, had some amazing company and got some shots I'm reasonable happy with. History: Cornish Kitchen Ware was first produced in 1926 by T.G.Green & Co in Church Gresley, Derbyshire, a county famed for its pottery. The range’s special characteristic came from the lathe-turning process, which cut clean bands through its beautiful blue slip to show the white clay beneath. It was apparently this that inspired the name, since it reminded one T.G.Green & Co. employee of the clear blues and white-tipped waves of Cornwall. The range of kitchen and table ware, from the hooped plates to the iconic storage jars, was an immediate success and remained popular from then on. This inspired T.G.Green & Co. to produce more colours of Cornishware, and more ranges, including the spotted Domino Ware and the cream and green Streamline Ware. In the 1960s, Cornishware was updated by a young designer called Judith Onions. It says much for her skill and sensitivity that this restyled range was embraced as warmly as the originals had been. Over the past 20 years, the range has become highly prized by collectors, with the sighting of both rare original designs and Onions classics the subject of much excitement – and ever-increasing prices. The story was not so happy for T.G.Green & Co. itself, however. It had become increasingly difficult for the Victorian pottery in Derbyshire to compete in the modern age and, after a series of owners had done their best since the Green family sold it in 1964, it finally closed in 2007. Now, my flickr finally decided to work, so I can actually show y'all some pictures.. Now, I must apologies for the quality of this - it's the only external I got, and it's from an iPhone, oops! I was sitting on a ledge, ready to drop out of the site and head home when I turned around and took one last look, camera was already packed away and I didn't want to leave without a memory of the exterior, so this will have to do!
  8. Brief History Founded in 1842 however, the business was originally located a short distance away in Gaulkthorn, an outlying area of Oswaldtwistle. In 1860 they moved thebusiness to Broadfield, then in 1900 his son set up the pottery on the present site. From then on the pottery stayed put and the business passed down from father to son until it's decline. The last mandatory accounts, made up to 3rd May, were submitted to Companies House in 2010, with the comment, "Nature of business, dormant company" My Visit After seeing so many reports about this little gem hidden away I just had to take a look for myself. After locating the site on the internet which was not easy, a week later I was in the car and on my way. The site is hidden by trees and overgrown hedge lines which was not always the case as I have seen photos where the hedges are none existent, however this made it quiet, peaceful and easier to explore. After arriving I decided to take a walk around the site and my first thoughts were that the buildings have deteriorated badly over the past few years, I was just hoping that the inside was not the same. After locating an entry point into the building I was in, all I will say is that straight away I noticed that lots of items I had seen pictured in other reports were no longer there. I am hoping that the current owner has removed these and that they have not been taken by people who have visited. Contrary to popular belief most people who like to visit these places are not doing it just to take trinkets, however, there will always been some bad eggs. I personally visit these places to document the building before it is to late and gone forever, not to steal. Overall I enjoyed this explore even though it was a shame to see items missing or removed from site. I only spent an hour here as I had forgotten my tripod which meant that some pictures I wanted to take was impossible due to the dark areas inside. A re-visit is needed. Ok, time for some photos.... Shop Entrance Out Building Before trying to locate an entry point into the main building I decided to take a look in the barn that was just off to the right of the main area. The barn as you will see looked like a dumping ground. Bits of all types of stuff just slung in over the years Inside the Shop After locating an existing entry point I was in, this is what greeted me. Sorry about the blur on some of the photos, as I mentioned earlier I had forgotten my tripod and it was becoming very hard work to get some decent photos due to the bad light inside. Low light means longer exposure and with no tripod, well, nightmare is the only real word to use. Items are scattered all over the floor and surfaces in this room. The table caught my eye first with a cluster of random items wanting to be photographed. Work Area As I walked out of the shop I passed through a kitchen that looked like it had been hit by a bomb, Then I entered in to what must have been the work area. This area is tricky under foot, you will see why in the photos. The roof was collapsed on top of old machinery, unfinished pottery, work tables, pottery wheels and much more stuff. A common pulley and shaft runs belts to various machines. This was normal Victorian industrial practice. The sheer amount of stuff left lying around is crazy. This is one of the work benches. Final shot from the work area is some of the pottery, I say some there was hundreds of pieces lying around. Machinery Area Next up was the machinery area, in the photo you see a rather large contraption, This machine pressed the excess water out of the clay after it has been cleaned of stones. Also in the photo you can see two small transport trolleys, there was another in the room just out of shot as well. Underneath the trolleys you can just about see a very rusty typewriter. As you can see this room has plenty to look at and believe me I gave my camera a work out. After taking silly amounts of photos I opened the door which was connected to the final area of the site and was greeted with this... No stopping me now I thought and slowly worked my way through tangles of Fern, Half way in and it became apparent I had been fooled. Hiding in amongst the Ferns was thorns that felt like razor wire! However I managed to make it out alive with all my limbs still attached. Final Area Just at the edge of the deadly fern field is what looked like, well to me anyway a small furnace of some kind. This area again was the same as most places on site. Lots of pottery lying around with machinery mixed in, I know, its a pottery site what should I have expected! Some personal items were also in this area as you can see in this photo. Final Thoughts I found this site fascinating & a little eerie which was strange as I never felt that when I visited places like Whittingham Asylum. Why do I feel eerie here? Maybe it is due to the presence of personal items left behind. Seeing names and faces of those people who owned & worked here. None the less, this was a nice place to look around. Some areas are in bad shape and other areas are not to bad. As all explores I am glad that I have been able to locate and visit this place before it disappears by either demolition or being swallowed up by mother nature. The only bad parts of the explore was: Seeing so many items missing from this place, I wish people could just take photos and nothing more & Forgetting my tripod, this made documenting the site hard work at times due to lack of light. Finally when I got home I realised I had missed a room on site, I know where it is as I walked passed it and made a mental note to check it out. Mental note failed, as I forgot. That means I feel a revisit will be needed in the future to see the room, this time with my tripod in tow! Thanks for reading, Dugie
  9. Taken from a newspaper article... The pottery was founded in 1842 by James Holding at Gaulkthorn a hamlet 2 valleys away from its present site. In 1860 James moved his buisness to Broadfield and in 1900 his son Grimshaw moved it to its present premises on the bleak windswept hillside above Oswaldtwistle. There are still relics of the Broadfield Pottery a road called Pothouse Lane and a row of 5 houses called Broadfield Terrace built by Grimshaw for each of his 5 sons. Now why would anyone want to build a pottery on a Heath? the answer lies in the soil for the pottery not only stands on clay but is surrounded on all sides by clay tons of the stuff thick gooey dirty brown clay, so when holdings need a bit of clay they just go outside and dig some up,which is why the pottery's immediate vicinity looks like an artillery range. Not only do they dig out there own clay,not only do they throw out there own pots,not only do they glaze them and fire them, they also sell them to the public in there own shop,that's productivity for you and in the old days they made there own bricks,fired them in there own kilns and used them to build the pottery. The equipment would bring a gleam to any eye of the lover of old machinery,there's the blunger,a great metal thing like a giant food mixer with blades inside which churn up the clay and mix it into a cream,then there's the sieve looking like a small railway bridge it squeezes all the water out of the clay and gets rid of the stones and then there's the pugmill which squeezes the clay again until it is tight and ready to be cut into loaves from which the potter takes his "passes the balls of clay he turns into pots. Its a pity about the steam engine having to go now, that would have been something to look at, they say that in the days of old miners getting the coal out of town bent pit used to know when it was snap time because they could no longer feel the thump of it through the ground when the pottery stopped for the mid day snack. in those days holdings employed 20-30 men,there was clay to be dug,hay to be harvested,bricks and pots to be made and fired for three days and nights in the kilns. Labour was cheap and plentiful,today its all different,we buy all our pots in shops ,pots which are mass produced either in the potteries or abroad. The Holding family cater for the discerning pot purchaser,the man or woman who wants a handmade pot because its unique,and who wants to know that it is made from the clay of the native heath. There's only one potter now Roland Tregurtha who with a name like that you would think was a cornish tin-miner but hes been at holdings for 31 yrs of his 45 yrs,and has thrown more pots than he could ever remember if he spent the next 31 yrs thinking about it and is happy to continue throwing until he retires. 22yr old Geoffrey Holding fresh from college with a degree in electronic engineering is running the shop floor part of the pottery while his mother and father mind the shop and his brother Richard puts in an appearance whenever he can. Electronics are as out of place there as bi-plane wings on a jumbo jet,fear not Geoffrey knows it nothing so upstart will be allowed to threaten the links that bind this industrial anachronism to Oswaldtwistle's potted history. Sorry for being pic heavy but there's shit loads to see in there... Ta to Evilnoodle for a bit of info :thumbsup: ... Thanks...
  10. UK T.G. Greens Pottery. Dec '13

    ...T.G.Greens Pottery... 'Cornish Kitchen Ware was first produced in 1926 by T.G.Green & Co in Church Gresley, Derbyshire, a county famed for its pottery. The range’s special characteristic came from the lathe-turning process, which cut clean bands through its beautiful blue slip to show the white clay beneath. It was apparently this that inspired the name, since it reminded one T.G.Green & Co. employee of the clear blues and white-tipped waves of Cornwall. The range of kitchen and table ware, from the hooped plates to the iconic storage jars, was an immediate success and remained popular from then on. This inspired T.G.Green & Co. to produce more colours of Cornishware, and more ranges, including the spotted Domino Ware and the cream and green Streamline Ware In the 1960s, Cornishware was updated by a young designer called Judith Onions. It says much for her skill and sensitivity that this restyled range was embraced as warmly as the originals had been. Over the past 20 years, the range has become highly prized by collectors, with the sighting of both rare original designs and Onions classics the subject of much excitement – and ever-increasing prices. The story was not so happy for T.G.Green & Co. itself, however. It had become increasingly difficult for the Victorian pottery in Derbyshire to compete in the modern age and, after a series of owners had done their best since the Green family sold it in 1964, it finally closed in 2007.’ Top notch mooch this place is! And nice and relaxed compared with my last visit where I was escorted off site by the local constabulary! On with some pics... Thanks for looking...
  11. What a giggle! Through a quick chat with BangoEX; myself and another explorer went to what I thought was Falcon Pottery works, It wasnt until I got back having photographed it and had a really confusing conversation we figured out I'd gone somewhere different. Ive managed to figure out what it is now... So heres a little bit of background.... William Henry Goss (1833-1906), owner of the Falcon pottery in Stoke-on-Trent, and his sons, Adolphus and Victor, are credited with the idea of making souvenir ware bearing crests and names of seaside resorts in the late 19th century. Now, many British people are familiar with the white glazed porcelain souvenirs, typically in classical shapes of Roman and Greek antiquities. They also made tiny replicas of visitor attractions like a statue of Captain Cook with the name and crest of the Captain's home town of Whitby. Small busts of famous people like Queen Victoria or George V, were also made together with of ships and cars. Goss cottages are amongst the most collectible. By the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, Goss china was immensely popular and, it is said, at least 90% of homes had at least one piece of Goss Crested China. Although the production of Goss China has long finished, the remaining Falcon Pottery building is a grade two listed building part of the London Road site owned by an unrelated company, Portmeirion. From what I can tell it became listed in 1979 and it has remains of pot bank, 1902-1905. Brick with plain tiled roofs. Surviving buildings comprise the kiln block and 2 workshop and warehouse ranges on opposite sides of a yard. Single storeyed kiln range of 9 bays with 2 downdraught glost ovens with circular hovels to the east of the site, and to the west, a 3-storeyed workshop range of 18 bays with doorways in the end bays, and fixed light windows with double ring cambered heads. Stone plaque of falcon in gable apex. Further workshop block to south of 3 storeys and 12 bays with similar detailing, built at about the same time. The works were built by Goss as an extension to London Road works established in 1858. Clearly a falcon, you can see why i never twigged.... You know where this is going..... This chair thinks it isn't over.. these confused me at the time.. Need to go back with proper back pack and tripod and do the place more justice!
  12. UK Holdings Pottery, July 2013

    I was traveling across to Accrington and by a fluke my shat nav was taking me directly past so it would be rude not to visit The place is falling apart but is full to bursting with little artifacts If I'm honest it was nice to get out of the van for a bit and stretch my legs .
  13. Holdings Pottery June 2013 Another fantastic explore in the superb company of Skankypants, Shush, Mr Toby, HitGirl, Richard and Auntie Pam. Really enjoyed this old place, was a propper mad dash ten minute job as the owner came along and very kindly asked us to finish up in five and be on our way rather than ranting which made a nice change, splendid chap. A strange building which seems to have been part residential at some point with lots of bits left. OMD EM5 and a 17mm.... cheers for looking.
  14. T.G. Green Pottery... ‘Cornish Kitchen Ware was first produced in 1926 by T.G.Green & Co in Church Gresley, Derbyshire, a county famed for its pottery. The range’s special characteristic came from the lathe-turning process, which cut clean bands through its beautiful blue slip to show the white clay beneath. It was apparently this that inspired the name, since it reminded one T.G.Green & Co. employee of the clear blues and white-tipped waves of Cornwall. The range of kitchen and table ware, from the hooped plates to the iconic storage jars, was an immediate success and remained popular from then on. This inspired T.G.Green & Co. to produce more colours of Cornishware, and more ranges, including the spotted Domino Ware and the cream and green Streamline Ware In the 1960s, Cornishware was updated by a young designer called Judith Onions. It says much for her skill and sensitivity that this restyled range was embraced as warmly as the originals had been. Over the past 20 years, the range has become highly prized by collectors, with the sighting of both rare original designs and Onions classics the subject of much excitement – and ever-increasing prices. The story was not so happy for T.G.Green & Co. itself, however. It had become increasingly difficult for the Victorian pottery in Derbyshire to compete in the modern age and, after a series of owners had done their best since the Green family sold it in 1964, it finally closed in 2007.’ 2nd visit to this splendid site, my first visit being slightly marred by being escorted off site by the local constabulary and then losing all the pictures I'd taken to a computer crash!! So, as we were working about 15 minutes away I took my camera to work with me the following friday and did her again... ON WITH SOME PIX... All in all a real crackin mooch!! Ta for looking...
  15. Soil Hill Clay Pottery

    Around the year 1784 Mr. Jonathan Catherall stated "my pottery produces mixing bowls, flower pots and bread crocks from our hard bed fireclay dug up from the hill next to our works and this is known as black pottery". Mr. James Robinson was a long standing partner until the year of 1805 when he left to start in partnership with Mr John Catherall and opened the pottery known as Clews Pottery. Mr Wilcock took over from the former Johnathan Catherall sometime in the mid 1800's but was unsuccessful to carry on in this line of business and closed in 1880, he now used the premises for breading poultry, around 1883 transferred to Mr John Kitsons where it carried on until his death and his family carried it on eventually Mr. Titus Kitson in 1897 recommended his business to Mr. Isaac Button who bought the company for £800 and around the year 1900 Mr. Button re-built the Pottery just a bit lower down the site and up until 1965 it remained with the Button family Mr. Isaac Button was a one of the last true if not thee last true English Country Potters and he was renowned for making a ton of clay pots in any 1 day, in fact he was once timed from throwing the lump of clay onto the potters wheel and producing an excellent pot then cutting it off using a wire cutter took him 22 seconds, 120 pots in any 1 hour and up to 1200 in any 1 day. The remains I saw today of Button's Kiln was derelict apart from the farmers stored belongings, The old man died in 1969 there is a broken down kiln the mixer and a few wooden items from days gone bye no more household pots/jugs/containers/bake wear/brewing pots/chicken feeders Etc which were sold for a few pence in the heyday as the potters had to be quick to make a living with the poor paid villagers. I don't know why but hand produced pots of good quality always look better to me than modern-day mass produced stuff. Final notes By 1900 England had only around 100 Country potteries and sadly by the end of the depression no more than a dozen. At Soil Hill there has been a pottery since the 17th century and before the first world war this pottery employed 13 men as time passed Mr Button ended up working the pottery on his own due to he could not find anyone to take an apprenticeship with him so 18 years passed on his own Mr Button dug the coal and fireclay/mixed the clay/formed his produce and fired the kiln all alone he must have loved his job and it’s a tragedy it ended the way it has...... below are 4 links relating to the Clay Pottery
  16. Visited with Jesus, Shadow and Speed Another one I didn't think was good enough to post up. Won't bother with the history, because you all no it off by heart nows anyways. Pictures aren't great
  17. Visited with Jesus, BravoZero and Speed from 28Dl. Great little site which I've reported on before so I won't bother with the history at this point, was waiting for Jesus to post up a report but I will do it because he's a lazy bugger Remember;.. It makes sense! Weeeeeeeeee..! Some exteriors too And last but definitely not least our polish security guard friend, who accused us of breaking windows, then said he would call a "forensic team" to come down and prove that we had broken one of the 26295693847530475343 windows of this place that have been broken, but after 10 minutes of arguing he decided he couldnt be bothered anymore and made us leave through the way we came in lol He got me and Jesus's face on his camera so I thought it would only be fair
  18. My journey started this morning, I was awoken by the distinctive BUZZZZZ BUZZZZ BUZZZZ of my awful bloody alarm clock that I've owned for 100000 years and loathed every rude awakening. Particularly in this case because last night because of the time I went to be, I also realised that my train to Leicester was 30 mins before the first bus of the day. But with stupid amounts of emotional blackmailing good'ole mum to the rescue. She got up at 6am to take me to the train station, what a legened eh? Parents, not quite as bad as they make out they are haha. "We will shortly be arriving in Leicester...Leicester our next station call..." Had arranged to meet Goldie87 at Leics train station at 8.30 and get a lift the rest of the way, cheers mate. I owe you. Funny access to say the least, I should have let you lot carry on going in difficult ways instead of point out the obvious... Anyhow, I'm sick of typing so here are the pics History... http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q= ... arch&meta= Pics Flame Resistant Suit FTW!!! Inside a kiln Medical Room Do want!!! And I leave you with a poor cat, that never did catch that god-damn mouse Also I made a quick vid of us hiding from security (who had dogs...) Hope you like Shadow
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