Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'preston'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 10 results

  1. The Explore So having already done this place a few months back we ended up in the area eating some delicious KFC and thought it would be rude not to have a stroll down to Joes and try our luck.. Old access points had been sealed very well and the main gate is now covered in new razor wire but were theres a will theres a way and all that The History St Joseph’s Orphanage was opened in 1872 on the site of an ancient alms house, and St Joseph’s Hospital for the Sick Poor followed five years later. They were built by wealthy widow Maria Holland, who gave £10,000 at a time when Preston had one of the worst mortality rates in the country, due to poor housing and low-paid mill workers. St Joseph’s Orphanage cared for 971 children before it closed in 1954. Run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy, the orphanage was the first welfare provider for Roman Catholic girls in Preston, taking in up to 60 youngsters at a time in two dormitories. After its closure, the top floor of the orphanage continued to serve as accommodation for the nuns who worked in St Joseph’s Hospital, known locally as Mount Street Hospital. The hospital held collections to help pay for health care for poor patients. During the First and Second World Wars, they tended injured soldiers and, over the years, tens of thousands of babies were born at the hospital’s maternity unit. Legendary performer George Formby died at the hospital following a heart attack on March 6, 1961. The hospital closed when the last sisters left nursing in 1982. It later became a care home, which closed down more than ten years ago.
  2. The Explore This is one that's been on my list for a long while now but always been sealed or never got around to going up there. On hearing it was open again we popped to have a look. I'm sure more reports will come from here as there was 14 other explorers here at the time! Like a Xmas urbex get together Place is fairly trashed now unfortunately and feel we were a few years too late on this one, lots of fire and water damage is slowly destroying this building but a good fun explore with some great people anyhow The History St Joseph’s Orphanage was opened in 1872 on the site of an ancient alms house, and St Joseph’s Hospital for the Sick Poor followed five years later. They were built by wealthy widow Maria Holland, who gave £10,000 at a time when Preston had one of the worst mortality rates in the country, due to poor housing and low-paid mill workers. St Joseph’s Orphanage cared for 971 children before it closed in 1954. Run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy, the orphanage was the first welfare provider for Roman Catholic girls in Preston, taking in up to 60 youngsters at a time in two dormitories. After its closure, the top floor of the orphanage continued to serve as accommodation for the nuns who worked in St Joseph’s Hospital, known locally as Mount Street Hospital. The hospital held collections to help pay for health care for poor patients. During the First and Second World Wars, they tended injured soldiers and, over the years, tens of thousands of babies were born at the hospital’s maternity unit. Legendary performer George Formby died at the hospital following a heart attack on March 6, 1961. The hospital closed when the last sisters left nursing in 1982. It later became a care home, which closed down more than ten years ago.
  3. Intro. Ok got bored being in all time has you do so decided to go out and explore. Wanted to do this for quite a while so went down solo (At First). When i got there was checking out the place and access etc when i found it a damn car pulled up and sat for ages right outside. So grabbed some grub and heading back where i spotted a lady right near access and was having a nosy lol. So i introduced myself would be rude not to. Turned out it was Hedgie with another person i didn't catch name sorry just coming out. After some good pointers i realized its way to much just for me solo and with night upon me so called for reinforcements. An hour later my friends turned up Tina and tony. Then off we went. All i can say was this was one of the most fun and awesome places i have been for a while. Loved it and hope you like pics. History. St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s,The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House. St Joseph�s is a Grade II listed former orphanage and maternity hospital developed as a sequence of buildings from 1872 through to the 1950�s. The original building is a two storey, red brick building in a high gothic style with a tower over the original entrance. The later 1930�s and 1950�s buildings are in a simple modernist style in brick. The buildings are arranged around a courtyard but one that is hidden from view despite its central location. The buildings are an important landmark and a significant part of Preston�s Victorian heritage and social history. Although the buildings have consent for conversion to residential use they have been vacant for a number of years. The site is in private ownership. Also this is the place george formby died. Here is an interesting link about this. http://www.blogpreston.co.uk/2013/0...george-formbys-death-and-his-link-to-preston/ Enjoy the pics Thanks for looking. Hope you enjoyed.
  4. This is the first of two visits with the tour guide, also known as Urblex. Thanks for getting me into this place bud. Really enjoyed both visits. Really early one this which suffered from bad light as a result. An interesting entry point which the eagle eye of Urblex had spotted. The building is a maze of connecting corridors and rooms, with a mix and match of features. Pretty filthy inside with the lower levels containing a flooded corridor with is raw to say the least. On the other end their is the medical section up stairs and the chapel. It had been on the list from the start and did not disappoint. St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s, and is now the Mount Street Nursing Home. The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House. DEATH OF A CHARITABLE LADY – HANDSOME LOCAL BEQUETHS In our obituary to-day we announce the death of Mrs. Maria Holland, of Bushell-place, at the age of 72. The deceased lady had suffered for some time past from the natural ailments of advanced age, and succumbed to her illness yesterday week. She was a lady possessed of considerable means, and was noted for great liberality, especially among the Roman Catholic community of the town, of which she was a member. She built and largely endowed St Joseph’s Orphanage, in connection with which she has recently caused to be erected a hospital for the sick and dying…. Thanks for looking.
  5. First Report History: St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s, and is now the Mount Street Nursing Home. The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House. (Nicked from the National Archives) Visit: Visited the site early morning, got there about 6 and met up with Urblex. Found the access was still open and we went in. I say we went in, Urblex got in fine but I was stuck outside. If not for the help from a caring Weelie-Bin then I wouldn't have got in. (Note to self....get better at climbing). Spent about 2 1/2 hours in there, didn't get lost really and got some good photos thought we weren't the only ones in there at one point, sounded like someone was coming down a corridor we had just come from then we saw a car outside but it was empty, no idea who's it was? Massive thanks to Urbex though, couldn't have done it without him! Cheers Mate:) The Photos: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 More photos available here https://www.flickr.com/photos/urban_lazarus/sets/72157650509957140/
  6. Hi, my names Matt. Recently discovered Urban Exploring after a project for University regarding decay. Not been exploring yet, but found a few prospective sites.
  7. Been eyeing this place up for ages but is it's in the middle of town & even at stupid o'clock that area is still full of club goers trying to make their way home :zombie:zombie .... Anyway popped out to get some milk the other day & spotted a much easier way, knew that i'd be kicking myself if i didn't use it before it gets sealed which has happened with other places & luckily had my exploring stuff with me (been back since & it has been sealed again). First solo explore in a while, apparently it's not the done thing but there's nothing like a solo explore in the dark to get your heart racing & make you feel ALIVE! Was a bit wary at first because of the easy access & i've been told that homeless people used to sleep here. Didn't get any good shots of the main screen as i heard a BANG when i was in there & nearly legged it, managed to 'man up' telling myself it probably came from outside but still didn't want to stay in that spot. Was pleasantly surprised to see some of the things i've seen in other peoples photos have remained in the exact same position And not a lot of vandalism, the building seems to be doing a good job of destroying itself with most of the damage caused by general decay. Had trouble lighting the place up with my sub standard 'army torch' so got a lot of dark photos & used the flash on some but i quite like some of the dark ones and it gives a good impression of how dark it was inside. History, Couldn't find a lot of history just a lot of stuff about a local action group wanting to restore the building to it's former glory, no offence to them but good luck with that... If i can find out anything else that's interesting/relevant i'll add it, If anyone else knows anything feel free to let me know... It opened in 1928 and only had one screen and a restaurant. By 1970 it had been renamed Odeon and the restaurant was turned into a second screen. There's also what looks like a nightclub called Clouds but the entrance was breezeblocked up (fucking breezeblocks again! ). The cinema closed in 1992 and the building has remained derelict since then. The site was bought by entrepreneur Simon Rigby in 2011, who has just bought Preston Guild Hall saving it from closure (which is disappointing, was looking forward to exploring the Guild Hall), but for some reason he's just left the cinema to rot for the past 3 years. Preston's filthiest hand dryer Had a look & think this is the first time it's been reported on OS woo!
  8. So this is my first post folks... Hope you like St Joe's has always intrigued me for some reason, so I was made up to have the chance to see it. A LOT of the site has been trashed over the last few months but it's beauty still shines through. Visited with scrappy, we had the place to ourselves and plenty of time for a good look around. A couple of near misses with the floors though, they are pretty gappy in places. It was a fun explore, hope to see it again! On with the pics.. Even had time for a quick brew Thanks for looking
  9. Visited with Cloaked Up. WARNING: If you've seen this 2012 or before, look away! At long, long last I've finally managed to get in! First and foremost, however there are some people here I owe a great deal of gratitude to for being able to do this. Firstly thanks to Telf1980 for sharing his access details with me; without those I would've gone round the hard way again and failed! Secondly to Cloaked Up for taking me here and keeping me sane. Finally to Catbalou and Tweek, whose access both got nailed shut before I had an opportunity to do the place; nevertheless I'm grateful for their intel. So here we are. Cloaked Up, Zotez and I failed at this initially in June after finding one climb too dangerous because of the rain; later being joined by Cloaked Up we try the other side, get in the garden (unfortunately Zotez cut his hand on razor wire and had to leave it), only to find all windows tightly boarded. We find Tweek's access, so Cloaked Up dives in (given how long we waited that day I was pretty damn happy!). Alas, the joy was short lived; the door was nailed shut. So that was a fail. Fastforward to September, and we're in. It has to be said, the owner/security/caretaker is genuinely determined to keep people out; in recent months chavs have broken in which is really sad to see, but you've got boards nearly everywhere, and random doors including those that lead to rooms with windows on the ground floor nailed. So what did the chavs do? Boot a load of drywall in! By the looks of it the chapel was sealed for a certain amount of time, as the connection between the maternity hospital was nailed (was open this year). Only way into the chapel we found was through a hole in the wall too. So after familiarising ourselves with the place, we hit the maternity hospital first. This is commonly reported on as the "operating theatre". Let me stress that this is not the case, it's a maternity/geriatric hospital! The place had two, side by side, sharing a preparation room. One thing that I really love about operating theatres is the sheer size of the lights; you expect them to be big, but they're absolutely enormous when you see them up close! The maternity and geriatric hospital extensions, dating from the 1930's and 1950's respectively, is arguably the best part of the site with seemingly little if any alterations being made since being built! Interesting that it closed in 1986 too, 18 years before the rest of the complex. Does anyone know what the 246 lights are supposed to represent? They're dotted about throughout the hospital, and I spotted one in the chapel funnily enough too. Despite only closing in 2004, you really cannot trust some of the floors in this place! Moving on up to the attic, we found some of the hospital paraphernalia stored up there. Couldn't spend much time though, considering there were copious amounts of broken asbestos on the floor. Not to be trusted! Other people have said that they've found the place among the creepiest and most foreboding places they've been to; I agree wholeheartedly. I can't explain why, but the place just seemed to stir up some really scary emotions in us! As far as I can tell very few people have had the pleasure of doing so, but I had this constant feeling that at any moment the owner would come inside and catch us in the act. Not only that, there was one point at which we heard this random sound in the hospital, which I can only describe as a sawing sound which didn't stop. I never did find out what it was; I didn't want to! The car that we spotted in the courtyard in June was still there; was the owner sitting in the reception, just waiting to pounce on an unsuspecting intruder? We didn't know! The lower floors of the hospital were used for storing the furniture once the place closed, with one room inaccessible because of all the stuff tipped in there! I can just imagine the old folks banging away on this! Haha Or racing in this? It took a while to find it with (as far as I could tell) the doors leading to it nailed shut, but we found the chapel eventually. Though it had some nice features, it was surprisingly spartan for a place of 19th Century origin. I also found it quite odd seeing only one stained glass window! Sad to say, however the place is in a poor condition now. Really poor. Some cock broke the head off the Virgin Mary bust! :mad On a final note, I have to be honest here. Whilst I'm relieved to have finally ticked it off the list and enjoyed seeing it, I found it disappointing overall. Maybe it was the fact that the place is just a mostly empty 1930s hospital, a chapel and an empty care home that isn't worth looking at? Or maybe it was that, like Pyestock I'd attempted it and failed miserably, and in doing so became too eager to see it? Maybe it's because it's looking far worse than it did last year? Everything perhaps. Nevertheless, it was worth seeing and I did enjoy it for what it offered. Love as always, TBM x
  10. first did this drain a few years ago and decided to go back the other week with my mate, as over the years i think ive got better with the camera over the years, i also shoot RAW now . last time i was here with my friend rob a work man popped a man hole above me and i almost crapped myself and ran off down the drian! so this time i wanted it to be uneventful, i didnt get my wish, at one point a bat flew in a chamber and was flapping around in my face and followed me as i was shouting WTF is that over and over. anyway less about me being a girl and here are the photos. had to be done
×