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Found 9 results

  1. History Bridge House Hotel is a Grade I listed building, set alongside attractive gardens adjacent to the River Swale. The building was constructed sometime in the 15th Century and therefore provided a historic atmosphere inside and out. After being redeveloped into a hotel in the 1900s, the lower floors were converted into dining, bar and lounge areas. The upstairs was divided into bedrooms, and ensuite bathrooms were installed in each room. The hotel was popular as it is located close to the A1 road and Catterick Racecourse; it is also relatively close to the Yorkshire Dales National Park and the vibrant city of York. Unfortunately, however, a fire destroyed part of the building in 2014. Six fire crews were called to attend the scene after flames were spotted coming from the roof. The cause of the fire remains unknown, but no one was injured during the incident as the premises was closed as it was undergoing renovation. Our Version of Events For the past few days, Bridge House Hotel has been the cause of a wee bit of drama in the North East of England. So, sit down and we’ll tell you the story before someone else steals it and tries to make a film out of it. A couple of photographs of the Bridge House Hotel popped up several days ago on Facebook and, despite knowing the person who posted them, he wouldn’t spill the beans as to where we could find the building. He’s under the impression all yobs, thieves, vagabonds, unsavoury sorts, hooligans and graffiti artists regularly monitor 28dayslater 24/7, all biding their time as they wait for new locations to ruin. As far as we were concerned, the fact he didn’t want to share details was fair enough, he wasn’t obliged to share anything with us after all. As for posting on 28days, we tried to explain that these places get trashed eventually anyway, regardless of posts on the forum; of course 28days posts probably speed the process up occasionally, but so do snaps on Facebook and every other social media website... Even if you don’t post the name of the site, or the specific location, people will find it eventually. The person concerned is also under the impression that all 28days forum users are ‘egotistic dickheads’, and we’re part of that crowd apparently because we post on the site, so we’re not permitted to hang out with ‘proper’ explorers who prefer to ‘protect’ abandoned places. After that brief incident, we spent the next day or so researching the damn hotel, trying to find every single abandoned one in the North East and North Yorkshire (we guessed the pub was somewhere around these parts), mostly to prove the point that all locations are discoverable without the name and place; as we said before, the photo on Facebook is enough. There is absolutely nothing wrong with trying to protect these places, but posting publically and then heavily criticising 28dayslater folk for revealing the name is, in our opinion, wrong. Posting images of any building on any site without a name doesn’t ‘protect’ them, it shows the world it’s out there and makes it desirable. It also doesn’t preserve the site for other explorers – one of the other arguments that was thrown at us – it does exactly the opposite. If anything, many more 28days users have their hearts, and mind-sets, in the right place when it comes to exploring and sharing amongst likeminded people, because they are willing to share and converse with one another. Anyway, eventually, after much internet trawling, we found the blasted place! It dawned on us at that point that we’ve driven past the fucking thing quite a few times, but we’ve always fobbed it off for being a shitty pub. We quickly grabbed a couple cameras and torches; whatever was lying around really, and immediately bombed down to the hotel in a rushed effort to beat the fading daylight that was hot on our tail. In hindsight, this wasn’t the best plan, as we only ended up bringing one SD card along, and half charged torch batteries which would inevitably run out during the explore. As we pulled up outside the hotel, we expected the ‘Facebook Clan’, armed to the teeth with cricket bats, spears and potato guns, to be guarding the premises. In anticipation that we might have a wee bit of confrontation (we all know how exploring folk like to hang around new explores they think they’re the first ones to ever enter), we recited the classic Braveheart speech: “they may take our lives, but they’ll never take our freedom…” and decorated our faces with blue stripes. Our efforts were all in vein, however, because, as it turned out, the place was silent when we rocked up. It only took a minute or two to find a way inside. A moist but pleasant derpy smell greeted us. At first glances, the place looked mostly intact and just as awesome as the photos had depicted; the bar and dining rooms were virtually untouched. Even more interestingly, though, the beers taps still worked, proving free glasses of slightly dated beer, and the wine cellar was still partially stocked. Having said that, there were far fewer bottles than the ‘Facebook Clan’s’ photos show. This could mean only one thing, the Greenpeace styled protectors weren’t protecting the place at all, they were drinking the bloody booze! Of course, this theory is entirely speculative, we have no evidence to support these claims – other than the diminished stock in the cellar and half empty (or were they half full) pint glass everywhere. Back upstairs, it also occurred to us that various objects had been moved around; the place almost looked as though it was staged, with armchairs, sofas and plant pots arranged in nice places. We’d assumed that professed protectors of sites like these might have put things back where they left them, to ‘preserve’ the place, but it seems this is a bit of a grey area. Again, however, our claims are entirely speculative; yobs could also have moved the furniture to make a temporary drug den or a brothel of some sort. Upstairs, most of the bedrooms were still in situ, and there was plenty of fresh linen. You could easily still grab a good night’s kip at this hotel. All the toilets still have their pipes too, which was a nice surprise. Unfortunately, though, it appears the yobs – or is it in fact the ‘Facebook Mob’ (a little rhetorical question right there) – have moved in, discovered what a Sharpie Permanent Marker can do, and started to tag the place. We found a fair bit of graff in a couple of rooms, especially in the kitchen. Caught in the moment ourselves, we must confess that we too became ‘wild hooligans’ for a moment, when we decided to rub the chalk board with the ‘Facebook Clan’s’ names on it a little bit with a Kleenex tissue. To our surprise, all the names rubbed off. It’s fascinating how easily chalk rubs off a board. After that, we may then have, purely accidently of course, scrawled our name in chalk over the top a little bit. Anyway, to move things along a bit, this little jovial act seems to have pissed a few exploring sorts off in our parts and subsequently shit has hit the fan, so to speak. As a result, anyone exploring in the North East may come now across some anti-WildBoyz graff, or graff that looks like it’s by our hand. To be clear, it’s not us, it’s ‘Facebook Clan’ ‘propaganda’. The moral of this story then folks: Thou shalt not piss off thee Clans of Facebook, or they shall feel the almighty wrath of the three Flickr, Twitter and Facebook kingdoms. Finally, to conclude this rant, we were originally going to post this report in a non-public thread, out of respect for certain people’s desire to keep it under wraps, but it hardly seems worth it since it’s all over Facebook now… Nice one ‘Facebook Clan’! As for the rest of you, go take a look at this place while it lasts if you’re in the area. All in all, while it’s certainly not worth a massive drive up, it’s a decent explore and we’d rather people saw it than pretend to keep it under lock and key. As we said to ‘the Clans in the North’, in a bit of an online dispute, exploring is about capturing a bit of history and sharing places with one another, it’s not about bitterness, jealousy and inhibiting everyone else from seeing them. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Box and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  2. After memories of passing this place and being dropped off in the carpark back in the college days, seeing the pub boarded up meant it’s been on the list to explore for quite some time. At the first opportunity, teaming up with Tiny Urban Exploration, we were there! The pub is now unfortunately stripped of most interesting features and nearly everything you can imagine smashed to pieces by the local youths. Kindly resulting in another injury for UrbexDevil for the second time in a row… cheers kids! Make shift wrapping up the cut to stop blood dripping everywhere we pressed on. Rather amusingly as we exited the building and proceeded to take external photos, the local police spotted us. After a rather amusing conversation on how they thought they were going mad seeing flashes and a long minor issue of a stop and search, we were told that kids were arrested only a few hours before us for smashing the place to pieces. Onto the history side now! The John Gilpin pub has been trading since 1878, owned by McMullens closed in 2014 after more than 125 years of trading. Despite a large investment years before, the land has been sold to developers and its demolition is imminent. The pub was named after a poem made famous by William Cowper in 1782.
  3. Visited with a mate one night last week, bit of a rushed visit. Photos not great as my main touch ran out as soon as got there and left the spare batteries at home, so using my back up light and most photos took one handed so little blurry but wanted to share anyway. Will prob do a revisit as 2 mins from my flat. Couldn't find much info on it but this is little bit I did find - Public house. Dated on rainwater head, 1904. Brick with stone dressings, rendering and half timbering, combined for maximum picturesque effect. Plain tile roof. Hearty blend of late medieval and Baroque features in a typically exhuberant Edwardian fashion. Three storeys and attics with two-storey wing to Deanery Way. Corner entrance and four-bay elevation, two-window return. Semicircular entrance porch surmounted by tower. Full-height pilasters marking the angles of the two elevations. Half-timbered tower above the entrance with bands of mullioned and transomed windows in two storeys, and rendered upper storey with oculus in cartouche; projecting domed cap. Elevation to main road comprises three gables, that to the right having decorative framing and overshadowing the pair to the left. Paired segmental-arched windows to ground floor with heavy voussoirs divided by corbel carrying upper oriel window. Other windows on first and second floors are mullioned lights with small pane sashes of original design. Jettied upper storeys are timbered with close studding and quatrefoil panelling in apex of gable. Stone dressings to windows in brick storeys, timber mullions above. Return to Deanery Way comprises two gables divided by a chimney breast. Each gable has segmental-arched window with stone voussoirs in brick lower storey, and mullioned sash windows in rendered upper storeys. Half-timbered jettied attic gables with mullioned windows in upper storeys. Stone pilaster at one side supports jettying of left hand gable. Lower wing beyond has high central entrance with segmental pediment, and flanking sash windows. Similar very tall sash windows with brick dressings in rendered upper storey. Decorative railings and rainwater furniture.
  4. The Tartan Tiger Bar hidden away and almost forgotten for many years is this lovely, yet mostly untouched bar in the depths of grand building in rural Scotland. The roofs are collapsing in several areas, it reeks of damp and mould, sounds like a perfect explore to me!! A long early morning drive I found myself wandering along a lovely little river, following its banks to avoid unwanted attention, I made the dash across a road and up through the long overgrown winding track which took me to the Bar. Quickly finding my way inside, I was amazed to see so much left behind, bottles, seats, plates, full kitchen equipment, photos from the bars regulars enjoying parties. One slight problem it was very very very dark the further you went in, almost dungeon like Thanks for looking!!
  5. UK A Gypsy's Pub May 2015

    I visited here with Lavino, I spotted it as we were walking by it and said we should go in and have a look at it. So once we got to the access point it stunk a bit and it was pitch black so I thought the place wasn't going to be too good, but when I turned around and turned on my torch I saw a bar full of bottles and un smashed glasses. Also there were quite a few stool's and tables dotted around also books all around on the floor for some strange reason. Next we moved onto the upper floor it was a bit brighter as it had windows but it still wasn't that much light, but the great thing about the upper floor is it had 2 glass domes which looked amazing ( one was taken into pieces and placed on the floor ) and there was another another bar which was also in ok condition. And then we moved onto a next set of staircases but this one was the living quarters of the owners and this was the only floor which didn't look too good as it had plants growing in one room and it also had a striped carpet plus a big steel safe lying on its side. Anyway here is a bit of history and some pics from my visit hope you enjoy . The has no real certain future but it is owned by a company named PJM Trading Ltd which has long since gone out of business. The pub was built in the 19th century. During the later half of the century traveling dentists would go to the rear of the pub and extract peoples teeth, they would also have a brass band playing to drown out all of the screams. The pub was put into the hands of local brewers in the early 20th century. The place has now been shut since 2007 ( and it seems not many people have been in it since the 8 year shut down ).
  6. Not much Information available about this place, awesome when you get lost and find a derp, seems to be happening alot these days full of cobwebs and nothing "placed" would indicate this as being a fresh find The lack of graff and signs of pikeyness was pretty impressive there was a stale smoke smell and a few burnt corners, a nice little throwback . First snooker table found so I did take a few Not sure what these cushions things are all about?! Cheers for looking!
  7. La Bateau has been closed for a few months, coming on a year, the front looks like shit and they have recently put scaffolding up in order to begin refurbishment of the entire pub/venue. The scaffolding will make it so easy to gain entry as there is open windows on the second and third floors of the building so it would just be a case of gaining access without passersby noticing, maybe get in at dawn and start shooting? If anyone else has any info/previous entries/wants to come with I'd love to get my first explore under my belt!!! La Bateau, Duke St, Liverpool, U.K.
  8. I was down in erith at the weekend, and always on the lookout for exploring stuff, and found a old working men's club, and a pub called the Royal alfred pub in manor rd, both boarded up, didn't venture in/or around as it's not the safest area to be in, but if anyone in area wants to have a look, this is a pic of pub before being closed below, and the working men's club looks a reasonably interesting building. http://pubshistory.com/KentPubs/Erith/RoyalAlfred.shtml
  9. I was down south for a few days doing family stuff and this is 5 mins from my mums house-it would have been rude not to stop and have a peak. It has been empty for years and keeps getting planning permission declined for one reason or another-probably due to its close proximity to the dual carriageway and having to change access. Solo explore this one. Didnt do the cellars as no torch but you can see that on the report on DP by UE-OMJ: http://www.derelictplaces.co.uk/main/sh ... THvyaU9nOU Nothing mind blowing but a nice mellow mooch if youre in the area-just be careful of the floor boards upstairs. My pictures... and the view out back window into the lorry park.... thanks
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