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  1. History W. T. Henley was a cable/wire company that was founded in a small London-based workshop in 1837. William Thomas Henley is famous for having converted his old lathe into a wiring covering machine which was used to cover wire with silk and cotton as this was in high demand at the time for electromagnetic apparatus. It is reported that Henley’s company progressed at an impressive rate and that he pioneered the submarine cable field (laying cables on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean).It was Henley’s dream that all of civilisation would eventually be linked together telegraphically. As WT Henley’s Telegraph Works continued to prosper, Henley decided to purchase a factory at North Woolwich beside the Thames in 1859 for £8,000. It is said that this development led to the laying of the Persian Gulf telegraph cable which is 1615 miles long, for the Indian Government. As a result, by the end of 1873 Henley’s Woolwich site had spread to cover some sixteen acres and his company also included three cable laying ships and a four-hundred-foot wharf to allow five-hundred-ton ships to load and unload their cargo. Sadly, Henley died in 1882; however, his company continued to grow in his absence and went on to form branches across the country. By 1906 work on a new factory in Gravesend was completed. The new factory is said to have been an impressive development and it included extensive, purpose-built, laboratories and a modern reinforced concrete air-raid shelter under London Road that could hold approximately two-thousand people. The tunnels were built into old caves within the Rosherville Gardens – an area of land located between the cable works and the cliff face. It is likely that the air-raid shelter was factory-owned but also open to the public as Henley’s company did not actually own Rosherville Gardens at the time and it featured a number of amenities and six entrances. Henley’s company continued to thrive as the Victorian era ended; however, its success can be linked directly to the Great War as it was a catalyst for technological and industrial development and change. By the Second World War, Henley’s company was publicly praised for its contribution towards King and Country – particularly its contribution to ‘Operation Pluto’ (the construction of petrol pipelines across the English Channel). Despite this success, a decision was made to close the main Henley factory at Woolwich due to the repeated damaged it suffered during the war years. A new factory was subsequently built at Birtley in the North East due to its reputation for being a ‘misty valley’ that made it difficult for the Luftwaffe to target factories, and this was completed in 1950. Sadly, a change of events occurred in 1958 when AEI acquired Henley’s company, having already taken over Siemens Bros in 1953. However, AEI is now the world’s oldest cable company and recently celebrated its one-hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary. Unfortunately, Henley’s Gravesend site was closed in 2008, though, due to it being ‘no longer viable to operate because of strong European competition’. Our Version of Events Not much by way of events for this one. It’s been a very busy few months and we ended up here to take a break after doing a spot of house viewing. Since we’d spent all day and most of the evening looking at damp, shitty rental properties that all looked as though they ought to be photographed and placed as reports on here, we arrived outside AEI in the early hours of the morning. Armed only with the essentials, our tripods, cameras and cans of Stella Artois, we made our way over the epic bog that you have to cross to find the entrance to the old shelter. We really underestimated how muddy this bit of wasteland was going to be to be honest and very nearly ended up taking a cold midnight mud bath several times. Nevertheless, we eventually made it across, with all our beers intact you’ll be happy to know. From this point onwards, getting into the old shelter was pretty straightforward. Once inside, we immediately set about taking our snaps. There was a shared feeling among us that the heavy feeling of tiredness was impending so we wanted to get the hard bit of the explore out of the way quickly. It didn’t really take long to photograph the place in the end though, once we’d worked out the general layout of the structure which is a grid-like setup. This left us with plenty of time to each pull up a chemical toilet and enjoy a few bevvies. And that’s how it ended. The tins were cracked and we sat wondering what it would have felt like to hear explosions outside and the thunder of guns shaking the paint and dirt from the ceiling. In reality, all we could really hear was a superb silence and the odd drip coming from a room to our left. What better way to finish an explore, with beers in hand and an abundance of chemical toilets at the ready. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  2. After a long drive stuck on the glorious M25 for hours on end, the Grove air raid shelters were nearby so took my chance for a quick solo mooch. I have to be honest, these have been on my list for quite some time but wondering around the tunnels the place became somewhat repetitive so I did not walk as far down the shelters as I could as they felt almost endless. None the less, it was great to finally see the shelter and a nice surprise to see graffiti at a minimum, despite nothing other than broken chairs, rusty buckets and a lot of spiders within the shelter.
  3. Dear All, This is my first post on Oblivisionstate even though I have been a member on the Fb page for a while, I thought it was about time I uploaded my photographs on here! You will see that alot of my uploads will be in black and white as this is my preferred medium, with some editing. I thought I would begin with my visit to The Grove Air Raid Shelter back in november 2014. I have only included 3 images, as all to see were a series of tunnels. There were 6 entrances in total, which can be found via the grounds of a prestigious hotel, by this point alot of the entrances to the tunnels had been blocked up as you can see by the 3rd image, so there was abit of hunting to find one which hadn't been bricked up. The tunnels were relatively easy to find, I visited during night in the hope to catch some bats in these tunnels, unfortunately I didn't encounter any. All that was left in the tunnels were some broken benches and rubbish! I hope you enjoy my post and expect more from me coming soon! Some background: The London, Midland and Scottish (LMS) Railway, with some foresight one presumes, bought a large area of land near Watford along with it's now disused Manor House for use as their HQ in the event of a war, away from their current HQ in Euston Station. As events transpired, by Easter 1939 with the on going approach of WW2, the move had started in earnest, being known as Project X. The full report/history of this place can be found here: http://rastall.com/grove/projectx.html 1. 2. 3.
  4. Hi! I think that our air raid shelters are quite different from yours. Just take a look! The first is in Ufa. And another two from Clelyabinsk. Thanks for looking!
  5. Wasnt going to do a report as ive bunged the odd one up here and there but the wifes blocked my view of the tv with a table she is painting so here goes.. We first visited this place back in 2011 with some comedy gold access to boot! Access was as funny if not funnier this time round ,Big shout to Woody on this one,thanks matey! Brief history stolen from underground Kent The company W T Henley has always been highly regarded for the manufacture of cable and electrical components and was clearly the company of choice when a system had to be devised as a countermeasure to the growing threat of German magnetic mines during the Second World War. As a result, a new site was constructed in 1939 in Gravesend for W T Henley and a complex of tunnels built underneath to provide air raid shelter for the company’s employees With at least six entrances, the air raid shelter was very clearly signed internally to ensure that there was no confusion when looking for your allocated space. Cut into chalk and lined with prefabricated concrete, the shelter tunnels were well laid out, including first aid areas and numerous latrines – in the form of Elson buckets. The tunnels themselves don’t seem to have much in the way of documented history unlike the cable works.. pics... I probably have more shots of this but these happen to be on my flickr and i cba with photobucket these days so this is what you get Explored with non member Trav who without i may still be down there now..
  6. Former Keighley College 6 Lord Street Keighley, West Yorkshire BD21 3DB http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2345327/World-War-Two-bomb-shelter-space-scores-people-college-car-park.html Gotta be worth a look ?
  7. Ventured out with Skeleton Key, Lara and Laird Tam We had got a tip off abut a shaft under Harlow but we didn't have a clue what it was, it had us stumped for a couple of weeks and I even emailed Subbrit I knew I should have just asked my Nan!!! Not only did my wise old Nan know about it, she's been in it several times!!! It turns out that the owner of Netteswell House was a Mr Lauritzen, he was the owner of Lauritzen Water Treatment, I knew my Nan worked for him when I was a kid but I only remember her working in building that was in Old Harlow Well it turns out that during the war years Mr Lauritzen had some outbuildings at the rear of Netteswell House that his staff worked in The Bunker was his private Air Raid Shelter, my Nan said that when the siren sounded then all the workers along with Mr Lauritzen and the staff of the house would go into the shelter, apparently it had lighting and benches and they would stay in there until the all clear was given and then they would return to work They would go in through the main door from the apple orchard and the shaft that we entered by was the emergency exit. When I told my Nan that we got about 60 foot into it she said that was about it, so it appears that behind the bricks would be a bit of mud and then the wall that joins the car park at the top of a newer housing estate __________________ The basic layout is like this. At the bottom of the shaft there was a small drop, about 2 foot and then you were in the main area, this was about 20 metres long and then you reached a doorway this led to the 2nd chamber which was only about 6 foot square and then the bricked up doorway. The door with the rusty reinforced bars was in this 2nd chamber so I'm guessing that it came from the bricked up doorway I have a short video of the place here.........
  8. I had seen a couple of pics from the tunnels under the Mesnes park in Wigan and a newspaper article that they were due to be capped off, I was passing by so decided for a dinner time explore to see if I could locate them. http://www.wigantoday.net/news/jordan-has-tunnel-vision-1-765754 With nothing more than the name of the park and a smart phone I pulled up to see what I could find 10 minutes and I was climbing down the ladder and into the darkness, isn't technology brilliant Sadly I snapped my tripod a few days ago so these are handheld . .
  9. I had intended on going down a couple of drains but the torrential rain had put an end to my plans and left me in Stockport with nothing to do. I've never been happy with my pics from here and I'm still not happy with the pics from the old entrance. There is now a sleeping bag and blankets near the entrance so I suspect there could be someone sleeping in here.
  10. ​The culvert was constructed between 1907-1911 carrying the Ouseburn underneath the suburb of Heaton. It runs for a total length of 2150 ft and built at a cost of £23,000. From 1911 the valley in which the Ouseburn runs through was filled gradually over 40 years of industrial and household waste with a plan to provide a level ground for housing, however, shortly after this new government regulations were introduced so houses were not to be built on landfill. In 1939 part of the culvert was converted into an air raid shelter housing upto 3000 people during the war. This was done by actually splitting the culvert in two, a concrete platform now sits above the water. My Visit This isn't the first visit for me and probably wont be the last. I've never been happy with the images that i got from in here but that changed after this visit. Im yet to walk the entire length of the actually culvert what your seeing here is the converted air raid shelter section. I think its about time i got myself some waders and headed underneath the platform. On with some images
  11. The shelter was was built to accommodate around 150 people, and there are two clearly defined phases of construction. The first part is lined with smooth rendered concrete and the second, obviously a later addition, is lined with pre-formed concrete sheets. A bricked up secondary entrance can be seen from the inside and two emergency escape shafts can also be found, although they have been capped and the ladders removed. The shallowness of the shelter, shown by the depth of the manholes, suggests that it was probably constructed in the 'Cut and Cover' style, rather than being tunnelled. Strangely, the tunnels are lacking in any old graffiti or any other evidence of their use as a shelter history taken from SUBTERRANEAN HISTORY visited with wevsky and permission from the local council the pump for the fountain above
  12. After an early sat morning start and the great english weather (PISSING DOWN AGAIN ). Me and wevsky head off to pick up obscurity and maniac, After a short drive up to northfleet we meet up with troglodyte peach and kheridr . A quick beer and breakfast stop then off to AEI henley cable works and shelters. What was to follow was an amazing set of tunnels,no graffiti completely untouched .Right after thanking wevsky for sorting the trip out and a to mr t for your help A brief bit of history W T Henley / AEI Cable Works Air Raid Shelter, The company W T Henley has always been highly regarded for the manufacture of cable and electrical components and was clearly the company of choice when a system had to be devised as a countermeasure to the growing threat of German magnetic mines during the Second World War. As a result, a new site was constructed in 1939 in Gravesend for W T Henley and a complex of tunnels built underneath to provide air raid shelter for the company’s employees. Taken from undergroundkent... on with the pics a few of the shelters maglite thanks for looking ....
  13. I first did this with obscurity about a year ago and decided i was never going to go back!! but....... i forgot my camera so i had to !! Visited again a little while back with frosty. After rigging up the abseiling equipment and checking our gear, making sure i had my camera, we desended into the entrance!! There isnt alot of info on this place but it almost certainly would of been used as a shelter during the war, but going by the seperate rooms with chalk cut seats and the fact its on 3 levels i dont think this would of been its intended purpose. It isnt very big and only had one room on the middle and lower floors but was still quite an exciting explore. Once inside we trudged though a couple of inches of bird crap and pigeon corpes and did the middle level. From the entrance the tunnel turned to the right. directly in front was small poo covered staircase curving round to the left down the to bottom room. Stangely the ceiling was only high enough to crawl down the stairs. Turning left the tunnel continued a short way with a couple of recess's cut into the walls. Towards the end on the right was a small drop going into the lower room. Looking back down tunnel At the end an entrance to the left was a short passage leading into the first room, on the right was a brick stair case leading up short passage there were seats carved into the chalk and a small candle recess with soot still on the wall. looking into room from passage chalk seats Next we headed up the stairs. At the top was small tunnel going of the left which was blocked and some more stairs leading to the original entrance at the surface. Looking up the stairs caped of entrance at ground level back down the stairs we headed...... we wanted to take a look in the bottom room but didnt wana crawl down the poo stairs so we jumped down the drop bottom room, passage at end leads to poo stairs looking other way, there was a recess on the right, probably for a toilet all in all was a good little adventure. it isnt very big but took us a while to fight our way through the pigeons and try not to touch the crumbling walls. Will DEFINATELY not be going back. Did a little video which can be seen here...... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtJHUj0iqmI
  14. Visited this site with Frosty, Muffie, Fortknox0 and my misses. After seeing the place a year ago i have been meaning to get down and photograph it or a while now. After a night of random bits and pieces we were amazed to find this place open! I think it will be sealed pretty soon as it is currently still in use. Right, very little is known about this site but it is believed that it originates from WW2 when it was used as an air raid shelter. This is slightly hard to believe as it is only approx. 12ft underground with an air shaft every couple of meters along! All the tunnels are used for now are to house a pump for an above water feature. The condition of the tunnels is good and they are of a good size. If anyone has any information they could add then please do Anyway...on with the pictures This is one of the original doors now left to decay on the tunnel floor. this was the primary entrance into the system of tunnels, now sealed up. this is just to the left of the original entrance... along with this. the first part of the tunnel is a common construction type seen in many WW2 air raid shelters in the area but then a very different construction type is used in the second half of the tunnel. The two methods can clearly be seen here. longest tunnel in the complex Showing more of the tunnel system thanks for taking the time to view my report, i hope you enjoyed reading it
  15. i no its been done before but heres my pics main part cool old bikes entrance exit cool old fair ground
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