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Found 22 results

  1. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  2. History This report is based on a ‘Californian’ bungalow – a style that is popular in New Zealand – that was built in the 1930s. It lies in the heart of the city of Wellington and as an ‘untouched’, ‘fully furnished property’ has been valued as being worth half a million dollars ($540,000). However, in its current condition the roof is no longer attached to the walls and it has been deemed earthquake prone. A brick wall was also removed for safety reasons following a recent earthquake as it was adjacent to a pedestrian walkway. What this means is that potential buyers cannot view the interior, by order of the City Council. Nevertheless, it is anticipated that the premises will still be sold and most likely demolished to make way for a new build. It is reported that an elderly woman has owned and lived in the property since 1966, but she vacated the premises at the end of 2016. Little is known about the woman; although one report suggests she was once a nurse. Several neighbours recall seeing the woman outside on the porch of the house feeding a tabby cat. Others say they often saw her sitting outside in her car. Sadly, what happened to the woman remains unknown. Our Version of Events It was eleven o’clock and we were stood opposite a dilapidated looking house on the other side of the street. All the doors and windows were heavily boarded, so we weren’t quite sure how we were going to get inside. We crossed the road, waited several seconds for a couple of people to pass us, then hopped a low wall to get into the alleyway that runs alongside the property.We figured if there was going to be any form of access it was probably going to be found around the back. Next, following a bit of creative thinking, wefound ourselves inching our way through a tight gap that we could just barely fit inside. The passageway we’d discovered was filled with years of grime and other things we’d rather not think about, and the air was incredibly stale and harsh against our lungs. After what felt like a lifetime of crawling flat against the foundations, we emerged through the floorboards and found ourselves inside some kind of cupboard. Rather disappointingly, no relief from the bad air was to be found though as the room absolutely reeked of the rich stench of piss. Gagging slightly, we hurried to pull ourselves out of the hole so we could stand up and try to find a room with better air quality. We promptly left the cupboard and found ourselves standing in the main corridor of the house. Since the lights were on, we could see into most of the rooms from here. We were thankful the lights were on too because the entire property was practically bursting with utter shit. At this point, we attempted to set up our tripods, but this was a challenge in itself since there wasn’t much room to put them anywhere. But, we somehow managed it and so, being very careful not to touch anything for fear of catching something incurable, we cracked on and started to explore the house a bit. At this point, though, we decided we’d make the whole endeavour a quick one. If anything, the heavy smell of piss was getting worse; it was so bad in the corridor it brought tears to our eyes. There was certainly plenty to see inside the building, especially in the dining/kitchen area, and it would have been great to have learned more about the previous owner to help preserve her history, but the very dated food substances we stumbled across put us off a wee bit. Fifteen minutes later, feeling satisfied that we’d seen everything there was to see, we were pretty keen to get back in the filthy hole again. There were a lot of old photographs and pieces of documentation lying around that gave some insight into who the old lady was, but in the end the smell became unbearable. In hindsight, it smelt a bit like there sewage pipes had malfunctioned. Anyway, putting that thought aside, we emerged back on the street in record time. The tight squeeze that had previously seemed challenging was in fact a doddle. After that we felt pretty damn dirty – the level of dirtiness you feel when you’ve been exploring non-stop for several days – so we headed off in search of an industrial car wash. Explored with Nillskill. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  3. History Clinton, which was originally named Popotunoa (after the nearby bush-clad hills), is a very small town in New Zealand. It was named after the 5th Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyne, Henry Pelham-Clinton, the former British Secretary of State for the Colonies. It is located along State Highway 1, approximately halfway between Balclutha and Gore, and has a population of 285. There are 129 occupied dwellings and 15 remain unoccupied. Government statistics indicate that the town is showing signs of a decrease in the number of people who work and reside there. As far as its history goes, the only interesting thing to happen in the town throughout its entire history was that it was ‘dry’ between 1894 and 1956. In other words, no alcohol was consumed anywhere within the town’s established borders. The townspeople were among those who voted in favour of the Temperance movement (a social movement against the consumption of alcohol and subsequent intoxication) across New Zealand in the early 1900s. However, it is important to point out that having never lived in the town ourselves, our view of Clinton’s uninteresting history is more than likely quite bias; we have never lived there, so perhaps do not appreciate the general goings-on that have occurred there over the years. The fact that there is a book titled, Clinton: Our History, is enough evidence to suggest that something more must have gone on since the mid-1800s. Unfortunately, we were not able to get a copy of the book to inform our reader’s because Mrs. Barnett was not home when we passed through town. But, if anyone desperately wants to learn any more about this town’s history, but more especially the stories and photographs gathered by local families, they can purchase the three-hundred-and-twenty-page book from Mrs. Barnett by giving her a ring on (03) 415 7723. Our Version of Events There was no actual plan to visit Clinton, it just sort of happened. After a massive fail in Invercargill, we happened to be driving through and randomly decided to stop off to stretch our legs a bit. We didn’t know it at the time, but true to its description the place was a veritable ghost town. Even the classic rock tunes blasting in the mini bus didn’t stir any life in the place. It took all of two and a half minutes to drive around the entire town and in that time we located a nice abandoned-looking row of houses. They looked a bit shit, but we figured they’d do just nicely while we took a break from driving. Finding the front door of the first house was a bit of a challenge, because it didn’t seem to have one. We thought that was a bit odd, but in hindsight, why waste money on a front door when you have a well-functioning back door. Seems perfectly logical when you think about it. Anyway, once we were inside we quickly discovered that the place was a right shit-hole. It would have been great the previous night when we’d had to kip in the mini bus (which was a lot more uncomfortable than it sounds) since it had several beds inside, a bathtub and a tin of chunky soup that we could have shared, but as far as explores go it was pretty desperate. There was a can of deodorant in there, too, which seemed to amuse our fellow Kiwi friends far more than it should have done… Five minutes later and we were heading towards the second house. This looked as though it had a lot more potential. We wandered down the main garden path and peered through the front window to make sure the place was actually abandoned. You have to be careful in New Zealand; you might be convinced a house is abandoned, but quite often it turns out someone is still living there. With this in mind, we wanted to be doubly sure that we weren’t about to walk in on someone eating their morning Shreddies. Still unsure whether anyone was living there, we wandered around the back to try the back door. The same trick worked, it opened without so much as a push. We entered the kitchen very cautiously, preparing ourselves to hit legs at any moment. Our shoes suddenly seemed to squeak rather loudly as we edged forward across the kitchen floor, and that classic sneeze that hadn’t been there all day now wanted to be released. Isn’t that always the way. Despite the epic nose explosion, we managed to make it across the kitchen and into the main corridor. This was the sketchiest bit, though, since all of the doors leading off the corridor were closed. In other words, we had no idea whether anyone was lurking inside any of the rooms. By now they’d be arming themselves with the nearest baseball bat, ornamental vase or double barrelled shotgun. Courageously, or stupidly, take your pick, we opened each of the doors one by one. Fortunately, it turned out the house was empty, but it had been an exciting five minutes finding that out. More importantly, though, this house was far more interesting than the previous one had been. This one had plenty of stuff leftover, which is what we all like. Oddly, it looked as if someone had started trying to pack things up at one time, but it seems they never managed to finish for some reason. After spending a bit of time in there, it became quite clear that no one had been around in a long while. There was mould growing in semi-drunk beer bottles on the dining room table, and dust on most of the belongings in each of the rooms. Judging by the photographs and ornamental objects in the cabinets, we’re guessing the place was owned by an elderly person and, sadly, they most likely passed away a few years ago. After around twenty minutes, we were out of things to take photographs of, so we decided to call it a day in Clinton and head off in the general direction of Milton. As we were walking back to the bus we did notice a third abandoned house just over the road, but it looked pretty fucked from the outside. Also, we figured two houses is more than enough for one report, so it’s there and ready for the picking if anyone happens to find themselves passing through the sleepy town of Clinton. Explored with Nillskill and Bane. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  4. A really cosy house with a butcher's shop in the front, someone in the house was a real collector as you can see from the cases full of miniature bottles, jars and the tiny bottles on the table. If you do like my pictures, please check out my fb page: Ianthé Baeyens Photography 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.
  5. Coleg Harlech was a residential adult education college for mature students, established in 1927 by Thomas Jones. Starting from just 6 students; numbers increased to 30 in the 1930's, then 70 in the 1960's. Coleg Harlech began offering a two-year diploma course validated by the University of Wales, which became a preparation for university education for those who had missed out on earlier education to give them a second chance. I had spent the day on Harlech beach with @plod and after our original plan became unsuccessful we headed to the train station. On our way there we came across this place which I was surprised we hadn't noticed sooner as it really stands out like a sore thumb, so we went ahead and had a look inside as we had an hour to kill anyway. There wasn't much to see inside but I'm doing this report because I've noticed nobody else has actually gone here. We did get a really good view of the beach from the roof though
  6. took another trip to Linford nursing home so i could show my friend around and so he could make a video in there... we set off about 4am this time to beat the traffic, after bumping into 4 groups last time.... and got there for 5 when it was light enough to shoot when we got there i instantly noticed how trashed the place has been in a little over a week! more smashed windows, crockery and even pikeys had been in there stripping the place of metal! luckily some of the rooms were left untouched and i got a few decent shots Thanks for looking
  7. History: Doughty House is a large house on Richmond Hill in Surrey, England, built in the 18th century, with later additions. It has fine views down over the Thames, and both the house and gallery are Grade II listed buildings. The house was named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786, and built St Elizabeth of Portugal Church in The Vineyard, Richmond. It was the residence of the Cook baronets from when it was bought in 1849 by the first baronet until after World War II. A 125-foot-long-gallery (38 m) was added in 1885 for the very important family art collection. The house was damaged by bombing in the Second World War and the 4th baronet moved to Jersey with 30 paintings from the collection. In 2012 the house was on the market with an asking price of £15,000,000. Future: C18 house with C19 alterations made by the Cook family. Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent have been granted to retain the main property as a single dwelling and to convert the gallery to ancillary accommodation, along with re-instating Doughty Cottage as the link between the house and gallery. The explore: So we spent basically all day in traffic jams to get there and back... The explore itself was surprisingly easy too; I must admit, that from what I have seen of it, I was expecting the place to be a little bigger than it was, but I guess thats the art of the wide angle lens! Anyway, great explore, would definitely revisit providing there are no traffic issues!
  8. Some of the most enjoyable places to visit for me are the old cottages that are always in the middle of nowhere, This one is no exception.. Its pretty decayed which lately Ive really enjoyed capturing! I think i did get a bit carried away with the pram and very distracted when i heard a few fast jets whizzing over!
  9. The only information I have about this one is coming from my grandparents, who used to know the people that lived there. It was the house of the principal of a little school close by, sadly enough they demolished it before I was into urbex. They called the man "mister pipe" since he always walked around smoking a pipe
  10. Still trying to catch up on all the explores I haven't posted, now only about 9 months and getting on for about 100 locations behind! This lovely little place in the rolling Welsh hills was a excellent find by a group of wandering seagulls from what I understand! I left my residence for the night in the Leeds area, heading off to SheepmanLandinshire to find exactly what this place is like. Arriving at the location and a very long boggy walk tot he location, I was soon in a amazed to see how good it was. Very similar to the ones I find in Scotland, but this one was a bit special, one of the first decent Residential locations I had done in Wales, and it did not disappoint. This location like the scottish ones is full of locations, prepare to be bored of my pics by the time you get to the end! It was time to head off once again and onto the next location! This was a wonderful wee place to explore, so much details left behind. I still stand by the my thoughts that the UK can be as good as Euroland for small Residential places, if you look hard enough! Thanks for looking!!
  11. Very little information about the abandoned Villa Beethoven on the internet. All I could find out ws that it was originally owned by a wealthy family and when the mother passed away the inheritance was fought over by the children which resulted in the house being sold to a developer. Plans to renovate the property stalled and the house sits empty… Visited with Lowri, Matt and Andy de Kay. Not the most inspiring of locations that I have visited, sadly the pool was pretty heavily graffitied and the rest of the place was very stripped and vandalised. the saving grace was a nice spiral staircase leading upstairs from the pool area. I imagine it would have been a lovely home in its prime but now it is left rotting away. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Thanks for checking out the report, higher resolition copies of the above photos and a few more from this place on my blog: Villa Beethoven
  12. History This report looks at some of the abandoned cliff top mansions on the outskirts of Christchurch. The damage to the mansions themselves during the 2011 earthquakes was significant to say the least, and as the cliff itself collapsed it took many of the buildings with it. Although demolition has begun, against the protests and campaigns of those who own them, the majority of the stricken homes remain, posed precariously over the side of the cliff. It is estimated that hundreds of million dollar mansions will be demolished in the coming months (330 alone in the red zone), however progress is often stalled due to bad weather which causes the land in the area to become more unstable; concerns are tied in with the knowledge that water can seep into the myriad of cracks found within the cliff which initiates substantial ground weakening. Construction workers reported that it took more than eighteen months to devise a safe demolition plan, and ground conditions are continually monitored. Alarms have been placed in the key demolition areas, and they are triggered by unusual ground movement and instability. Initially, the use of explosives were considered, but those plans were quickly disregarded for fear of bringing the whole cliff down onto the buildings and roads that lie within close proximity beneath it. Since then ‘unmanned’ drones have been used to assess the structural damage of every structure, to calculate whether human demolition crews can enter each property. Once unspoiled and seamless, offering picturesque views as they overlook Sumner Beach, the mansions now stand cracked and broken. Pools and terraces sit empty, and only vacant chairs remain; taking in those spectacular views alone as they look out to sea. The first to be successfully dismantled was a six bedroom property, formerly valued at $2.28 million – re-evaluated to be worth less than a dollar. Although it was reported that the houses had been entirely cleaned out, it is at this stage worth mentioning that many people were in fact unable to reclaim their belongings and alongside full fridges sit the remains of people’s lives. Many people were forced to flee for their lives and were unable to grab their possessions as they left. Being conscious of this, I have tried to limit the photographs to reveal fewer personal items and effects, to give viewers a taste of the destruction rather than entirely invade other people’s privacy. Our Version of Events As for our little escapade; having aggravated the church royally on our last quest, we decided to leave the city for a short while, and worked our way towards the outskirts to seek out the fabled lost mansions of the Port Hills area. Now, despite the fact that they’re on top of an enormous cliff that towers above the city, we spent a good while struggling to find them; not sure what happened there. After much searching, we eventually found ourselves at the bottom, near an entire abandoned school which is directly underneath (they still mow the lawn and maintain it however), staring up in awe at bits of mansion poking out over the edges of the cliff – the next challenge though was to find our way to the top. The roads leading up to the Port Hills mansions are narrow and winding, and it is easy to mistake entire side roads for driveways. This is what we did for the next hour or so, as we became more confused in the maze of carnage (we wanted to get to the uppermost buildings which were situated at the highest point, so we passed many damaged structures). In the end we ditched the car and continued on foot, sneaking past the folks whose houses were somehow unaffected, until we finally reached what we were looking for. The damaged was far greater than I expected; although looking back I’m not exactly sure why I imagined it to be any less that what it was. These were some of the worst affected buildings I’ve seen in Christchurch. Staircases were dislodged, entire walls teetering – held together by a few crumbling fragments – and rooms completely distorted and buckled as we walked across their floors. Many of the mansions have ‘no-go’ lines drawn across at certain points, indicating which part of the building is slanting over the edge of the cliff. There’s not very much to stop a curious person stepping over those lines however, even with the knowledge that you will face imminent death if the structure did decided to topple over the side. Pushing those thoughts aside, guided instead by an awesome curiousity, we managed to explore several of the mansions and small gardens. Still, I should hasten to add that curiousity is a dangerous phenomenon, and sometimes you can overstep the mark; we did this by peering into an old chest freezer in a garage. I lost a few sensors in my nose after that one. Explored with Nillskill. 1: Private pool and terrace 2: Extensive structural damage 3: Poolside chair 4: Kitchen contents 5: The lost bedroom 6: Decaying toys 7: Former bedroom 8: Bathroom (toilet roll rack - nothing better than being prepared!) 9: Living room mirror 10: Someone left the dog behind 11: Fireplace 12: Store cupboard in the garage 13: Mansion exterior 14: Mock European style mansion 15: Crumbling walls 16: Main hallway 17: Looking down the corridor 18: Dining room and kitchen 19: The kitchen 20: Looking into the living room 21: View from the living room 22: The patio - positioned over the cliff 23: The cliff - suddenly a lot closer 24: A broken kitchen 25: Tentative steps 26: The main street 27: Broken letter box 28: Someone's former living room 29: Patio door barely clinging onto life 30: A studio style bedroom
  13. Been a while since I last got round to uploading a set and doing a report on here, so a bit rusty, I present to you The Fly Agaric Cottage. Having a crazy alien come spend a couple days at my federation space shuttle deployment centre. After an initial pleasantries, an agreement between the grizzly bearded mongrel and the alien invader was set in place to visit a couple of Scotland's finest well protected and preserved residential dwellings. Prior to departure for the fine examples of derp dwellings, a night of festivities had to be conducted. After several other worldy concoctions, the beer googles and cider visor was firmly in place and a solid nights slumber ended a night of much laughter and race relations between the intrepid explorers. The time came for departure and a wild space race ensued with meteoroid dodging and asteroid belt of razor edged mountainous rocks, the race was an impending carnage or tragedy waiting to happen, until full reverse thrust was applied and grizzly mongrel and crazy alien found themselves in a strange new world. Climbing the gates of Black Cow Gate, the adventurers saw mystical erratically wandering clouds in the distance, as they grew closer, black snarling faces grew upon them, the adventurers presence were obviously not welcome in this new world. "We must move forward" shouted the grizzly mongrel, "follow the Ent like creatures" screamed the alien. The ent like creatures swayed in the wind offering protection from the snarling fluffy clouds. Finally the adventures reached civilisation... Entering the imposing castle, the adventurers were relieved to find they had in-fact found safety. It was time for the weary travelers to return to the shuttle and head off at warp speed to a new world, they ran from the castle, hurrying past the fluffy clouds who had gathered menacingly at the door, their snaring faces foaming at the mouth!! Finally they made it back to the shuttle, unscathed, but the did learn a lesson that day! Don't mess with the Fly Agaric! Stussy & Oldskool
  14. Another report from the last Belgium infiltration and this place was a stop on the second day but unfortunately we were spotted and were sent out. We came back on the way to the ferry on the Sunday and did it instead. A couple of hours mooch around here, some nice spots inside. Think that the place next door which was a dentist was also the owners parents house but unsure on the history Externals Internals Thanks for looking in. Tim
  15. Evening all, One stop from May involved stopping at this well known place that I've never been close to before so we stopped here for an hour or so. No history that I know but it looks like the previous owner liked cars and judging by those using it now, some form of restoration has been happening but I think it may be on hold now. It was OK in places and worth the wander. Very overgrown but a good uninterrupted explore. On with some photos. Thanks for looking in.
  16. Evening all, As part of our 35 man tour in April this year, one of the early morning stops on our first day was at this village on the outskirts of the powerplant and within the exclusion zone. The Chernobyl contamination was divided into four exclusion zones based on radiation amounts. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone with highest contamination is officially uninhabited. In truth, over 2,000 elderly villagers illegally resettled their homes and farms inside the Zone. Today nearly 400 remain. More than 3,000 workers manage the Zone, living in Chernobyl town during 4-day and 15-day shifts. Another 3,800 personnel commute daily to work at the Chernobyl plant from their new home in Slavutych. After the accident in 1986, over 160 towns and villages nearby were evacuated. Many were demolished, some were simply abandoned. This village that is beyond the main zone of exclusion where radiation fell but evacuation was not mandatory. In Ukraine, this included over two thousand villages. The accident and indirect consequences continue to affect these residents physically, economically, socially and psychologically. The questions remain - Why do people stay? No alternatives or a sense of duty or because this is their home? On wandering around in the time we had, there were a few villagers who came out to see what was going on as someone attempted to access their home. Just goes to show that people are resilient and decide to plod on, regardless of the situation. One had cattle and crops in the garden. Some of the photos. Thanks for looking in.
  17. Evening all, Another Belgium residential, this time a small dwelling in the countryside that was a little small for four guys but we managed. Not much known on the history besides the owners come and check on it from time to time but we went early on our last day and did the business before making our way to a few others on the way back to the ferry. On with the photos. Not many taken as there wasn't much and some of it was a little messy but we managed an hour. There was a piano in the other room but too much mess and seen better pianos in better locations so just took more or less what you see here. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Cheers for looking in. Tim
  18. Evening all, Another report and a small place that was pretty empty and is slowly becoming another popular spot on the tour bus and who can blame them? Beautiful artwork on the walls and some great stairs is the sum total of this explore but worth the hour we spent there. Nothing in the rooms worth photographing. Also met some nice Dutch guys who have turned out to be good contacts to have. On with some photos, no idea of the history of this place. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Thanks for looking in.
  19. Hi, I haven't posted anything since my subscription, here are my first pictures for OS : Northern Italy, in the Piemont area, a curious abandonned house, built on the other side of a river. Quite in a shabby state, but completely without graffiti or destruction, given that it's in the middle of nowhere, and the access is not so easy : you have to climb down and up, and cross the river (the bridge fell down to the waters).
  20. I thought it was being squatted at first. Some lovely details in here but stunk of catshit and I trod in some so didnt spend much time here! haha. 1 2 3 4 5
  21. No story about this mansion, all covered by the nature... http://www.flickr.com/photos/haileiselassie/sets/72157635980698983/ Uploaded with ImageShack.us Uploaded with ImageShack.us Uploaded with ImageShack.us Uploaded with ImageShack.us
  22. Hi all, Sorry I seem to be flooding the boards since I joined, been reviewing some stuff archived on Flickr and thought I'd post a double as I know only two people (besides me and a friend of mine) that did both of these as they were closed up within the week of us finding them. Both very close to where I live and where I grew up hence very local. The church was actually opposite the main bus stops and in view of houses - we went back a few days later and there were padlocks all over the main door = new ones too. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 The farmhouse was more or less bare and managed to visit this twice before the builders secured it down. Some proper urbex decay in there with the bottles just left as if they wanted them photographing!! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 Thanks for looking in.