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  1. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  2. The Jordanhill Campus is an historic estate within the boundaries of Jordanhill in Glasgow, Scotland. The buildings have stood empty since 2012, until which time it served as the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. Sometimes you just can't understand why no one else has posted a report. This is one of those places! Initially @The Amateur Wanderer and I had a look around the place during our Christmas trip to Scotland, and then I returned a short while later with @SpiderMonkey. We only looked around one building, the David Stow Building which is the main attraction, the original and oldest part of the site. There is also a huge 1960s concrete extension behind, but the sooner that gets pulled down the better - we didn't bother with it! History The buildings date back to 1837 when former merchant and educational pioneer David Stow opened the Dundas Vale Normal Seminary, Europe’s first purpose-built training institution for teachers. Some remnants of the old seminary still remain today – rooms with rows of sinks which were more recently used as storage, and wooden lockers can still be found. In 1913 the Glasgow Corporation agreed a deal to buy the estate, and build both a teacher training college and the associated Jordanhill School on the site. A new building was planned to provide teacher training. With the new school completed in 1920 and the college in 1921, the now Grade B listed David Stow Building facilitated all teacher training provided under the unified University of Glasgow. Centrally funded and with no ties with churches, the college was largely non-residential and its range of work was wider. A shortage of teachers throughout Britain in the late 1950s lead to large scale expansion at Jordanhill. Construction of a new purpose-built facility commenced in 1961, replacing a much older manor house on the site. In 1993, the college was required to merge with a higher education facility. The University of Strathclyde approached the college, and an agreement between both institutions was reached. In 1993 Jordanhill College became the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. With better use of facilities, and an ageing campus at Jordanhill which was highly protected by preservation orders, in 2010 the decision was made to close Jordanhill campus and move the Faculty all courses to its John Anderson Campus. 2011-12 was the last academic year held at the Jordanhill Campus before the move took place. David Stow Building - Entrance Hall Francis Tombs Hall Staircases and Corridors Teaching rooms and facilities Other areas Hidden Relics There were a few areas around the building that hadn’t been refurbished and contained relics from older uses...
  3. The Station Hotel is a grand Victorian building situated in the heart of Ayr town centre. The hotel consists of 71 bedrooms, complete with en-suite bathrooms, plus a host of suits for functions and a cocktail lounge. The hotel, which is attached to Ayr railway station, was originally opened by the Glasgow and South Western Railway in June 1866 and become part of the British Transport Hotels (BTH) at Nationalisation. It was sold by BTH in October 1951 and has changed ownership a number of times, having been owned by Stakis Hotels, Quality, and Swallow Hotels. The Station Hotel is currently the oldest and most famous hotel in Ayr. The hotel has retained almost all of its original features inside and out. The hotel started to turn away customers in 2014 and closed around 2015. After suffering neglect for some time beforehand, the building is now deteriorating; the railway station have had to take action to safeguard their customers from falling debris. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The car park is fenced off due to parts of the exterior falling off Entrance and staircase Reception Lift and staircase on the first floor Into the cocktail lounge.... The corridor leading to the next parts was suffering decay due to leaks in the roof The Arran Suite... Restaurant... The restaurant's kitchen Other public spaces around the hotel... The Kyle Suite bar area The Carrick Room The Kintyre Suite And finally, the hotel rooms... View of the decaying rear facade overlooking the railway station
  4. The Big Idea opened on April 15 2000 and cost of £14 million. It was built at the Ardeer Peninsula, near Irvine, on land that had been donated from ICI that also had an explosives factory and testing facility nearby. It was closed in September 2003 after not attracting enough visitors to keep it open. I couldn't get inside the building itself but through the windows I could still some of the exhibit’s that are said to be for sale but since it closed they appear to remain unsold.
  5. I've seen this location posted a few times but not recently, so decided to take a trip and see what it's like now. There is a house to the east of the site that appears that someone is living there a I saw two cars drive through the site towards the house.
  6. Been a little while since I posted anything. Derp Cottage, located in what some consider Miserable Scotland, visited on a windy and cold day, but it had rather nice views. Thanks for looking
  7. Just a crappy stripped out church, but something about it would tickle the nipples of a god fearing nun. But I liked it enough to take a few pictures anyway. I 'm almost sorry you had to look this report, I am scraping the barrel, but I'm not really sorry
  8. Hello, another from my long long long list of shitty cottages I have to post up on here tp convert you to the deeply weird realm of cottaging! Found this almost my accident whilst exploring with a couple friends, after walking what felt like miles through small forests, over streams, up and down heather marsh lands and over several feilds to visit some of the shittest derps you could probably imagine, I spotted this on the way down the wild hills. We took a chance as it was on a live farm, found the door open and decided to pop in for 30 mins and grabbed some pics. We all felt a bit uneasy as it was a live farm and decided to get out quickly, just as we were closing the door a car came down the drive way, and we bolted like a mini heard of highland cows stampeding our way down the side of the house and over a few fences to safety. Never been back, but one day I will! Thanks for cuming cottaging with me
  9. A bit of history: Sunnyside Royal hospital was a psychiatric hospital founded in 1781 located in Hillside, Scotland. The hospital was originally founded as the Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary & Dispensary by Susan Carnegie. In 1858, a new improved asylum was completed in the village of Hillside on lands of the farm of Sunnyside and the old site was vacated. The site was further developed adding a new facility for private patients called Carnegie House in 1899. Despite this addition, overcrowding was a problem, as the asylum's patient numbers had grown to 670 by 1900 leading to additional building work to be undertaken. Two new buildings were added to the facility and additional staff were required to care for the additional patients. A further development was the addition of Angus House, which was built in 1939 to accommodate elderly patients suffering from dementia. After the 1946 National Health Service act brought the hospital under the control of the Eastern Regional Hospital Board, the name changed from the Royal Asylum of Montrose to the Royal Mental Hospital of Montrose. In 1962 it became Sunnyside Royal Hospital and came under the jurisdiction of new management. The site was officially closed in late 2011 after being open for 230 years and most patients were sent to a new £20 million build at Stracathro Hospital. The Explore: Its not often we venture north of the wall so we didn't arrive at the location until after dark and the by that time the weather had taken a turn for the worse. This was the last stop of the day after a gruelling 03:30 set off and was to act as base camp before the crazy drive home in the morning, After wandering around in the rain for a while we managed entry and began the explore. After a very short walk we decided we found the best spot to set up, nothing to do with no one daring to explore further.... After what was possibly the worst nights sleep ever we took advantage of the morning light and began wandering. The place definitely had a much safer feel to it and has to be the best asylum I am probably going to see for a very long while. Explored with @-Raz-, @Hydro and another friend not on OS. Cheers for looking!!
  10. Fife Power Station was a gas fired power station located in Cardenden, Fife and was a gas-fired station that was able to generate a combined cycle output of 109MW. The site was bought out by Scottish and Southern Energy for £12.3 million which secured the work of the 10 members of staff that worked that at the time until the station closed in March 2011. This was the second explore of the day and after being sat in the car for an eternity it was good to have a mooch around this place to stretch off. A fair bit of the site has now been demolished and whats left is far from working condition but was still a worthwhile visit added to the road trip! Cheers for looking!!
  11. Slowly catching up on my reports. This lovely little place situated in the Grampian area of Scotland. I spotted this one on google maps and went for a look, parking up at the nearest point I could which would not attract any attention, this resulted in me having to walk over 3 fields over a stream and strangely into a new plantation of Holly Trees which surrounded this lovely little place. Not much too it, but you can decide for yourselves. Thanks for looking!
  12. Hi guys, this is my first post on this forum. My friend and I have been vlogging our urban exploration adventures and there has been a hugely positive response. Here is our vlog from our trip to Edingham Munitions Factory in Scotland. As a result we decided to expand and create a website and a number of new features. One being a blog. Here is a blog on our most recent trip to Edingham Munitions Military Factory in Scotland. https://offlimitsexploration.wordpress.com/2016/07/03/edingham-munitions-factory/ Enjoy!
  13. I haven't posted for a while, been pretty busy with Euro explores and finding new explores (more to come), but realised I hadn't posted this lovely little location from last year. The pics are from my first visit and a couple visits with friends I took here. The site is a very strange place, the images I am posting are from what I have called the main Cottage, a lovely hand built chapel (by the former resident)and the Garden Room. Hope you enjoy this place as much as I do! The Cottage. The Chapel The Garden Room From my first visit. Revisit Thanks for looking!
  14. Visited as part of the Scotland tour with @Butters & @R0tt3nW00d After spending a little longer than anticipated at Eastend, we decided to skip one of our planned locations and head here instead as geographically speaking it made more sense than heading yet further North at 4 pm. I'm glad we chose to do this as it would appear there is more here than most peopel realise. On arrival it was rather surprising to find that the whole area was saturated with dog walkers, so most unusually we walked straight past the security house and into the heart of the Asylum. 3 times the secca passed us in their pick up and didn't even look twice at us. There is more to be done here, but for now as i can't see me going back in the near future, this will do History; Shamelessly ripped from Wiki with a few minor alterations Bangour Village Hospital was a psychiatric hospital located west of Dechmont in West Lothian, Scotland. It was officially opened in October 1906 (under the name Edinburgh District Asylum), over two years after the first patients were admitted in June 1904. In 1918 Bangour General Hospital was created in the grounds, but the hospital began winding down in 1989 with services being transferred to the newly built St. John's Hospital in the Howden area of Livingston. The final ward at Bangour eventually closed in 2004. The hospital was modelled on the example of the Alt-Scherbitz asylum of the 1870s, at Schkeuditz, Germany, and represents one of the first village-plan psychiatric hospitals in Scotland. The Bangour institution comprised individual villas which would house approximately 30 patients each. The village also incorporated its own railway connection, a farm, bakery, workshops, recreation hall, school, shop, library and, latterly, a multi-denominational church. The hospital was requisitioned by the War Office during both wars when it became the "Edinburgh War Hospital" and "The Scottish Emergency Medical Hospital", reverting to a psychiatric hospital between the wars and after 1945. The number of patients rose to over 3,000 in 1918. Temporary marquees and prefabricated huts were erected to cope with the demand for bed space, for both patients and staff. This led to the creation of Bangour General Hospital in the surrounding grounds, which was to become a world leader in many medical fields, in particular its esteemed burns and plastic surgery unit which was established in 1940. It also had a 1st class Maternity Unit serving the whole of the county. In 1989, St John's Hospital opened in nearby Livingston, and services were transferred from Bangour General Hospital, which closed in the early 1990s. The Village Hospital also started to wind down after the opening of St Johns, with the last remaining ward closing in 2004. The hospital site comprises numerous buildings and structures, including 13 category A listed buildings. An architectural competition held in 1898 was won by Hippolyte Blanc. The villas are domestic in character, while the nurse's home is more institutional. The villas were set within landscaped grounds, and are built in a 17th-century Scottish Renaissance style, with numerous individual variations. At the centre of the site is an Edwardian Baroque hall, and a Romanesque style church, which was designed by H. O. Tarbolton and built 1924-1930.[ When the hospital was built, road access was poor, and considerable volumes of coal and general stores were required for the running of the facility. A private railway line was built, branching from the former Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway line at Uphall. It was authorised by the Edinburgh and District Lunacy Board Act of 30 July 1900, and it was opened to passengers on 19 June 1905. It may have been used before that date in connection with construction of the hospital. The North British Railway operated the line, but the Bangour station was considered private. However there was an intermediate station at Dechmont, which was open to the public generally, and was much used by staff at the hospital who lived at Dechmont. During World War I the road network was improved, and the railway became unnecessary; it was closed on 1 August 1921, although passenger services probably ceased on 4 May 1921. The closed hospital was used as a filming location for the 2005 film The Jacket, starring Keira Knightley and Adrian Brody. During September 2009, the hospital grounds were used as the site for "Exercise Green Gate", a counter-terrorist exercise run by the Scottish Government to test de-contamination procedures in the event of a nuclear, chemical or biological incident. This involved 250 volunteer "casualties" and 400 emergency staff. The site is now also popular with Urban Explorers people who enjoy exploring old and abandoned buildings, taking pictures to document their existence before they disappear due to either severe decay or demolition. The local health board however are not keen and as of 2005 have security patrolling the grounds to stop people entering the now dangerous and unstable buildings. (Shit load of good they were LMFAO) On the 1st of October 2015 Planning Permission for a residential and mixed use redevelopment of the former hospital site is being sought. The application notes some of the listed buildings at the site may be proposed for full demolition in a subsequent application. This may include villas 7,8,9 and 21, with other buildings potentially proposed for partial demolition. Unfortunately we never made it into that spectacular rec hall or the chapel, however what we did find that i hadnt seen before was this; Thanks for looking
  15. This quick selection of pics is from a recent trip into the mountains near where I live to visit some lovely cottages. These locations are all within close proximity to each other so makes for a nice day out. First stop was an old school, which was half converted into a house, but never quite got finished and sits quietly at the side of the road. Next up, a good few minutes walk away was this old cottage which was well set off the road, but sadly very negligated, so much so it was filled with sheep shit half way up the door, but what a view! The Straw Cottage, lying quietly down a old foresty road, ground floor was full to the ceiling with straw bales, but the first floor held some nice pieces of furniture. The last stop just up the road in a very overgrown cottage, I thought it would be pretty rubbish, but I was pleasantly surprised! So there you go four fairly average cottages, but all very lovely in their own way! Thanks for looking!
  16. Lovely little location on a few hundred metres from each other. The Farmhouse and the Cottage situated in rural Grampian, I found these on route to another location, didn't spend too long here as they were fairly empty but had some lovely little features and a bit of a surprise when I had a good look around the table inside the cottage! The Cottage The Farm Thanks for taking the time to look!
  17. History The now derelict Bangour Village Hospital is a large Psychiatric Hospital complex which first opened in 1906 as The Edinburgh District Asylum with an initial 200 patients. The Asylum which was modelled on a German village-plan design similar to that of the Alt-Scherbitz asylum of the 1870s. In 1918 when the Asylum has around 3000 patients it was renamed as Bangour Village Hospital and operated under this name until its closure in 2004. As with many other hospitals Bangour was requisitioned during both World War I and World War II and held the temporary names of “The Edinburgh War Hospital” and “The Scottish Emergency Medical Hospital”. Both in the interim years between the wars and after 1945 the Hospital continued to function as a psychiatric facility. A gradual phased closure of the Hospital began in 1989 with the closure of Bangour General Hospital (now Demolished) and the opening of the nearby St John’s Hospital. The last remaining wards closed in 2004. Since its closure, the Bangour Village Hospital was used as a location for the filming of The Jacket starring Adrian Brody & Keira Knightly. In 2009 The grounds were also used as a location for a counter-terrorist exercise named “Exercise Green Gate” which was a large scale training set up with 400 emergency services staff and 250 volunteer casualty actors. The activity was intended to prepare staff for chemical, biological or nuclear attack. Our visit Visited with Baron Scotland and Lowri, I’d always wanted to take a look around this place and was pleasantly surprised at by how vast the site was… the villas just seem to go on forever as you walk around the grounds which are frequented by local dog walkers. We managed to get access to 2 buildings the main recreation hall which was one of the original buildings and the church which was added in 1929 and was in surprisingly good condition with only some relatively minor water damage to one gable wall. Most of the other buildings seemed to be very heavily boarded and in worsening conditions. I don’t imagine there would be a great deal else to see but I wouldn’t mind a look around the nurses block at some point. It’s certainly one of the more attractive buildings externally. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Enjoy
  18. i just felt left out so i googled images of a local burnt out cinema by me. here goes first attempt. hope it works lol.
  19. hello from Scotland. my name is rich and ive really enjoyed looking around all the posts on this website at all the derelict buildings.
  20. Recently I went further north than I ever have before, on an explore/fun times roadtrip to Scotland and the far north of England. Whilst it wasn't the most fruitful in terms of epic explores it was great to be out in some truly beautiful areas of the country seeing some new stuff. Garthland House Chapel was once part of a large estate turned nursing home, which now sits in a semi-demolished and perilous state. Luckily the chapel is still relatively intact and very pretty, but the rest of the place is really nothing more than a dangerous ruin with water pouring through it from the day's rain so we focused our efforts on the chapel itself. Thanks to Baron for the heads up on this one Thanks for looking
  21. Another installment from a recent trip up North. This location was given to me as a tip off by a good friend who the site is named after. Arriving in the area late in the evening, having only about an hour left of decent light, I decided to check it out prior to heading off somewhere to camp for the night. A fairly lengthy walk from my parking location, the farmhouse ground were definitely still in use with fresh tractor marks using the drive. Still being bold I pushed on up over the gate and along the farm track road, soon halting my progress seeing several cars next to the building which was still some distance away. I thought I could see someone in the window as well, so gave a few waves, but couldn't tell what was happening. Fuck it, I walked right up to the place through the small ford, and too soon realise, the car was on bricks and the person I was waving woo was wallpaper hanging from the ceiling, idiot. I found a nice access point, and decided to leave it at that. Early next morning I was back at the crack of dawn, everything went smoothly and got to spend a few hours in this place, having a wee nosey around. The House of Scorn There was so much stuff left inside here I only just scratched the surface, its definitely on the list for a re-visit! Thanks for looking!!
  22. Another mini installment of my recent venture up north to this lovely wee farm. Not much infor on it, but some lovely colours and a cracking wee derp shed, everyone loves a derp shed!! Thanks for looking!
  23. Whilst having a scan over my area with Google Maps, I spotted this derp cottage which looked very overgrown, so had a bit of potential. A few weeks later I was in the area and decided to check out to see if it was any good, arriving at the bottom of the track, there was a lovely derp landy waiting for me. Looking from the bottom of the track I could also partially see the roof of a building, my derpy senses were tingling, I had high hopes there might be something good at the top of the track. A long hike up the overgrown track, I soon found the cottage, well it was fucking shit. Not even the derp JCB got me interetsed, this being as close as I got to it. But there was still the Caravan, yes!! Oh the joy of exploring a Derp Caravan, oh the excitement! After walking all the way there I almost did go back down the hill, but since I was there, best take a look. A little rummage around, there was a few nice bits left behind. I am 99% sure this is the same cat as in the previous Photos. Yes you really just did look at an explore of a DERP Caravan, but sometimes it just makes it worth the time to take a look! Seeing as I was wrong about the Caravan, I decided to look around a bit more, oh a DERP SHED, my luck was defo in !! It might not look like much, but a bit of research it turns out this bike is a custom built Roberts Road Bike, probably worth a lot of money nowadays! And what derp explore would not be compete with out a Singer Sewing Machine! So surely this explore had given me everything it could possible do, but NO, I remembered there being stuff on the Satellite image, further north, so off through the jungle of spikey bushes and low and behold I found another Landie! Not only a Landie, but a Ice Rink Machine Thing! That really is it, there was another Landie disassembled and piled up in the grass, a few big trailer fridges etc, but this seemlingly shit find turned out to be a rather good one! Thanks for looking!!
  24. Another derp installement from my ventures North. History (stolen from Secret Scotland) Inchindown fuel depot lies in the hills some four miles north of Invergordon, and was constructed in the period 1939-1942, during World War II, as a bombproof fuel oil store for the Royal Navy, and was connected by pipeline to the Royal Navy dockyard, fuel depot, and port facility at Invergordon. The depot was also referred to as Inchindoun, and the Inchindown Admiralty Underground Storage Depot. Reports indicate that five such stores were constructed around the country at the time: Inchindown, Copenacre, Hartham Park, Monk's Park and Portsdown. Had the German Navy blockaded Britain's ports, these depots would have been called on to provide fuel for the Royal Navy. The depots stored Furnace Fuel Oil (FFO): Medium viscosity, boiler NATO Code No: F-82; Joint Service Designation: 75/50 FFO. FFO is basically the residue left behind after the fractional distillation of crude oil, and resembles treacle when at room temperature. Phased out by the Royal Navy in favour of diesel fuel in the late 1970s, it was last used by Leander class frigates, Falklands veteran aircraft carrier HMS Hermes, and the Royal Yacht Britannia. The depot contains six storage cells, five being 237 metres long and 9 metres tall/wide (roughly 800 feet long and 30 feet tall/wide), holding up to 5.6 million gallons, and a smaller sixth tank, 170 metres long. The first tank carries a plaque commemorating the date February MCMXLI (1941). The access tunnels are a mixture of lined (from the portals), and unlined construction at the rear of the cells, where the access panels are located. The Explore These storage tanks are normally sealed and only permission visits are allowed, we chanced our luck and nipped in past as we were in the area, luckily the door was unlocked! After some initial hesitations I went for the access into the tanks, I am a fat small bastard, so i laid down on the stretcher and was pushed through the pipe. shoulders scrapped sides it was mega tight, but I was in! Sadly I only had my trusty P7.2 with me so the shots didn't come out well enough to post them all, abut another visit with better lighting options will happen! Thats all there is really, thanks for looking.
  25. Another boring topic from my venture up North. Nothing much to say about this wee derp farm, spotted it from the main road, a quick de-tour and few photos later, you have this! Derp. Thanks for looking!
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