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Found 13 results

  1. Much like everyone else Ive been itching to get in here for a very long time, Well an opportunity presented itself so I though hey why not, lets get down there! A selection of my pics from the night in Question A nice bit of Original Graff And looking up into a vent shaft Ill admit I was disappointed with my pics from the night, was all a bit rushed and as it seems to be of late way too many people about! Thanks for looking
  2. Another one of those that I've been wanting to do for years, It became common knowledge as to where the entrance was and after a tip off I thought it was high time I paid this last section a visit ! A little history about the Ramsgate ARP tunnel network; The design and construction of the tunnels was masterminded by the Borough Engineer Mr. R.D. Brimmell B.Sc. A.M.I.C.E. as early as 1938, but was repeatedly turned down by the Home Office. Ramsgate's flamboyant Mayor of the time A.B.C. Kempe kept the pressure on, and with the increasing intensity of the war in Europe permission to start construction was given in the Spring of 1939. Work started immediately at a cost of just over £40,000 plus a further £13,500 for services and fittings. The first section between Queen Street and the Harbour was opened by the Duke of Kent on the 1st June 1939. The tunnels were 6 feet wide, 7 feet high and constructed at a depth of 50-75 feet to provide an adequate degree of protection against random bombing with 500 lb. and 1000 lb. medium capacity bombs. In the case of a direct hit, a 500 lb. bomb would not be expected to damage the tunnel; but some spalling (splintering) of the chalk would be expected if the bomb was a 1000 lb. medium capacity type and the overhead cover was less than 60 feet. After the end of World War II a large sewer pipe was installed in part of the system under Ellington Road and continued down to the Harbour. The remaining entrances were sealed and the tunnels began to fall into disrepair. And some of my pics from the visit On the 24th August 1940 Ramsgate received more than 500 bombs when a squadron of German aircraft were approaching Manston. Their leading aircraft was shot down over the harbour and in vengeance they decided to release their bombs over Ramsgate. This was the first air raid by the Germans on an unprotected town. On that fateful occasion countless lives were saved by an underground Air Raid Protection (A.R.P.) system of tunnels dug for the purpose. These tunnels extended for approximately 2½ miles around the town with 11 entrances at strategic points providing refuge within 5 minutes walk of most areas. A 1500 yard long former railway tunnel was also used and linked to the A.R.P. system. The tunnels were equipped with chemical toilets, bunk beds, seating, lighting and a loud speaker system. Many people took up residence below ground having lost their homes above. Others used them just for shelter or to move around town during a raid. And finally a nice bit of original Graff that I spotted despite running around muttering expletives like a loon A fantastic night had by all, thanks for checking out my Pics !
  3. Well finally onto our last explore of the night last night, myself, woody and two others went on to do this one, after a long day and night exploring this was 4th on our list for the day/night, been wanting too see this section for a long time so to finally see it made us more than happy and we all came out with a big smile on our faces, apart from the chalk grafitti its very nice down there and harldy any litter etc. bit wet in places but thats to be expected with all the rain we've had the last few months. i wont bore you with the info as theirs so much of it about and been posted before but heres a few pics i took and i hope they show just what a lovely place it is :-).
  4. Visited this place about three times back in 2010,Never have been happy with these pics but in my defence i was very very drunk most the time so they are what they are.. Fast forward 3 and a half years and i was back down here.Saw a report go up on this last year and after a while we went to pop the lid and have another look round,the lid refused to lift more than a few inches so after a couple of attempts and feeling a bit puzzled we left it . Recently pics have been appearing on Failbook so we assumed the alternative access point had been used! On getting in my first port of call was the far end to see why that cover wouldn't lift,Seems some BELLEND had tied rope under the cover and onto the ladder inside which would account for it not lifting,Ropes still on the floor and in one of my pics.. Brief info.. The cannon rd section lays in between the westcliff and the main section (train tunnel)..access into the main section is stopped by about a 25m long stretch of roof fall and at the westcliff end by a sewer pipe cutting it off and running into the westcliff section and up what would have been the ellington section now after a 30 odd foot crawl totally consuming the tunnel itself... visited with Spaceinvader,Obscurity,STeALtH and his missus.. pics in no real order Note the rope on floor which had been tied under the cover one of a chalk shaft.. Sorry about the fisheye overkill the wangle is bust and in shop
  5. The Cannon Rd section of Ramsgate tunnels, nice night out with Fortknox0 and Gadget, in by midnight, out by 6.30, in the shower, eat some food and off to work ;D. Cheers for looking peeps , Frosty.
  6. Something else I have been waiting an absolute eternity to do, but was finally given the opportunity so seized it with both hands, Visited with Non member Dan H, A bit of History borrowed again from a highly respect site: The town's borough engineer and surveyor R.D. Brimmell conceived and planned a scheme for tunneling galleries out of the chalk. This was similar to the only other known network of deep shelters in Barcelona that Spain built during the Spanish civil war. Following Hitler's seizure of Austria in 1938 Brimmell put his proposals before the town council for submission to the Home Office for approval. The plan was rejected on the grounds that it was "premature". Following Munich, the council approached the Home Office a second time but were again turned down. In the spring of 1939 when Hitler walked into Czechoslovakia, the council made a third appeal to the Home Office who relented and excavations began. By the outbreak of war, work was nearing completion on what was to become one of the most extensive network of deep air-raid shelters anywhere in the country. Plans were soon in hand to incorporate both the standard gauge and narrow gauge tunnels in to the shelter network. The tunnels would be linked to a further 3.25 miles of new tunnels skirting the town in a semi-circular route. The contract for this immense undertaking was awarded to Francois Cementation Co. Ltd., at a cost of £40,383 with an additional £13,481 for seating, lighting, chemical toilets and the costs of converting the existing tunnels. Work proceeded night and day and the first section of the network between West Harbour and Queen Street was opened by the Duke of Kent on 1st June 1939 with the contract due to be completed by the end of that year. As each new section of tunnel was opened it received it's allocation of local people with strict regulations enforced; smoking was forbidden and pets and prams were not allowed underground. The first section opened had batteries and a generator but the rest of the tunnels had to rely on the town supply, which was at times erratic. Eventually the council provided 200 hurricane lamps. There was also a system of loudspeakers to relay wireless programmes and announcements. The tunnels ran at a depth of 50 to 90 feet, following the line of existing roads wherever possible. For most of its length they were unsupported and un-lined but the entrance tunnels close to the surface and a few short sections through unstable ground were lined with reinforced concrete. For most of their length the new tunnels were 6' wide by 7' high with toilet recesses fitted with curtains at 75 foot intervals and a first aid post every 1000 feet. There were ten ventilation shafts throughout the system with manhole covers (still visible) in the roads above. There was seating for 35,000 but the shelter was expected to hold 60,000 without difficulty. There were numerous spur tunnels serving 10 entrances located mainly in public parks and open spaces, (one of them at Vale Square was filled in before the shelter opened as the area was well served by two other entrances) with an 11th entrance in the hospital as a quick route for taking patients down from the wards and casualties up into the hospital. The Very Famous "Please Refrain From Spitting" Sign Stenciled onto the wall And Finally one of me messing around Thats all folks, thanks for taking the time to view my pics
  7. Visted With Phill, Les, Ben, and myself, we arrived a little late to the proposed meet-up, because we got breakfast - omnomnom we managed to gain access via the wrong grill. but never-the-less, armed with a map and a compass we made our way around, Starting at cathedral we followed our noses to the smell of a fresh bbq, to see a pre-lit foil tray with no food but never mind! we plodded on, after speaking to two people who stayed over night.we attempted to get to the northern section (as we thought this was where everyone was headed), so following the map we soon lost track of where on the map we were, so vaguely following north, we somehow ended up going around 4 times and thought lets try and get back to catherdral and start again, so we plotted and pondered and eventually we turned up, about 1-2pm just as everyone finish a group shot as was on their way out, so after a few minutes to get our breath back and say our goodbyes, we decided to head back to the entrance and head to the northern section once more. So after a few twists and turns, over a few falls, we still got lost, but suddenly we saw a sign! a big square tank, after looking at the map, it sure was a eureka moment! So yeah after that we didnt get lost again, but on the way out we ended up getting trapped in the dead routes once more and could find the way home! but needless to say, we're alive! Also thanks to Phill, Les, Ben for lighting up the tunnels, and inviting me along! Anywho, sorry to drag on a bit, but here's some photos =) Thanks! Please check Out my other photos! http://www.flickr.com/photos/mperryphotography/
  8. Hi all have been wanting to get in to the Ramsgate Tunnels for a very long time now so when Space Invader tipped me off that I should get my backside down there I did just that , So now for a little history about this amazing network of ARP's courtesy of the Ramsgate History forum. The design and construction of the tunnels was masterminded by the Borough Engineer Mr. R.D. Brimmell B.Sc. A.M.I.C.E. as early as 1938, but was repeatedly turned down by the Home Office. Ramsgate's flamboyant Mayor of the time A.B.C. Kempe kept the pressure on, and with the increasing intensity of the war in Europe permission to start construction was given in the Spring of 1939. Work started immediately at a cost of just over £40,000 plus a further £13,500 for services and fittings. The first section between Queen Street and the Harbour was opened by the Duke of Kent on the 1st June 1939. The tunnels were 6 feet wide, 7 feet high and constructed at a depth of 50-75 feet to provide an adequate degree of protection against random bombing with 500 lb. and 1000 lb. medium capacity bombs. In the case of a direct hit, a 500 lb. bomb would not be expected to damage the tunnel; but some spalling (splintering) of the chalk would be expected if the bomb was a 1000 lb. medium capacity type and the overhead cover was less than 60 feet. After the end of World War II a large sewer pipe was installed in part of the system under Ellington Road and continued down to the Harbour. The remaining entrances were sealed and the tunnels began to fall into disrepair. More to Be had Here http://www.ramsgatehistory.com/forum/in ... opic=311.0 And now for a few of my pics taken over two Visits, The first with Maverick and the Second With Dan H Dan Doing His Thing Thats All Folks, Thanks for Viewing
  9. Visited with UrbanGinger,Obscurity NutUE,Stealth and Jayne This is my second visit to this location ,My first I was a noob to photography and did not own a tripod so as expected the pictures where far from good.Even my History was way off! Fast forward 2 years or more and ive finally got around to doing the place again. Brief history, The Ramsgate Tunnels as they stand today consist of Three Doable parts, The Main section Cannon road section The Westcliff section The main section was cut off from the cannon rd section sometime in the 50�s when an over head water main had leaked causing a massive roof fall. The Cannon rd section was cut off from the Westcliff section in 1954 I believe, when a trunk sewer was constructed utilising the existing tunnels Cutting off access into the Wescliff section and destroying the Ellington section. This is probably in my opinion the nicest and apart from the odd chalk name the less molested of the three I�ve visited. On with pics taken with way too many people wandering about with torches.. A nice revisit and worth the effort
  10. Being right on are door step and hearing of plans to try and open them to the public we decided a local explore was in order ... visited with wevsky obscurity and frosty .. a little history.. The town's borough engineer and surveyor R.D. Brimmell conceived and planned a scheme for tunneling galleries out of the chalk. This was similar to the only other known network of deep shelters in Barcelona that Spain built during the Spanish civil war. Following Hitler's seizure of Austria in 1938 Brimmell put his proposals before the town council for submission to the Home Office for approval. The plan was rejected on the grounds that it was "premature". Following Munich, the council approached the Home Office a second time but were again turned down. In the spring of 1939 when Hitler walked into Czechoslovakia, the council made a third appeal to the Home Office who relented and excavations began. By the outbreak of war, work was nearing completion on what was to become one of the most extensive network of deep air-raid shelters anywhere in the country. Plans were soon in hand to incorporate both the standard gauge and narrow gauge tunnels in to the shelter network. The tunnels would be linked to a further 3.25 miles of new tunnels skirting the town in a semi-circular route.The contract for this immense undertaking was awarded to Francois Cementation Co. Ltd., at a cost of £40,383 with an additional £13,481 for seating, lighting, chemical toilets and the costs of converting the existing tunnels.Work proceeded night and day and the first section of the network between West Harbour and Queen Street was opened by the Duke of Kent on 1st June 1939 with the contract due to be completed by the end of that year. As each new section of tunnel was opened it received it's allocation of local people with strict regulations enforced; smoking was forbidden and pets and prams were not allowed underground. The first section opened had batteries and a generator but the rest of the tunnels had to rely on the town supply, which was at times erratic. Eventually the council provided 200 hurricane lamps. There was also a system of loudspeakers to relay wireless programmes and announcements. on with the pics... THE WESTCLIFF SECTION visited with obscurity ... The tunnels ran at a depth of 50 to 90 feet, following the line of existing roads wherever possible. For most of its length they were unsupported and un-lined but the entrance tunnels close to the surface and a few short sections through unstable ground were lined with reinforced concrete. For most of their length the new tunnels were 6' wide by 7' high with toilet recesses fitted with curtains at 75 foot intervals and a first aid post every 1000 feet. There were ten ventilation shafts throughout the system.There was seating for 35,000 but the shelter was expected to hold 60,000 without difficulty.There were numerous spur tunnels serving 10 entrances located mainly in public parks and open spaces, (one of them at Vale Square was filled in before the shelter opened as the area was well served by two other entrances) with an 11th entrance in the hospital as a quick route for taking patients down from the wards and casualties up into the hospital. thanks for looking
  11. This section of air raid tunnels is only 1 section of the Ramsgate Air Raid Tunnel system.It is now in 3 different parts due to blockages.Having recently got a whisper that this section was now doable we siezed the moment,I would of had better quality photos,but the visit was cut short by 2 rather friendly patroling Community Support Officers
  12. Right this isnt a ground breaking new and interesting report its a very well visited place..Im posting this short report as i finally have had chance with my tripod and dslr to get underground,ive visited this spot more times than i care to remember mainly in the 80's but recently using my trusty nokia camera fone this is just to show ive come a fair way since then and finally with recently arrived tripod got out to take some better pics,long exposure and for convinience some with flash and freehand as i wanted to show my mate around before i got started with tripod! a few long exposures The rest was taken on a tour round the tunnels as my mates 1st trip ,before i got me tripod out for pics above Right sorry its the same old over visited main tunnel but was itching to try out my tripod underground and do some light painting..im hooked guys:)
  13. Westcliff section had been very keen to visit a group of us have been looking into it for ages..and with a little help from knox obs and frosty,thanks for the help guys ,We got our location.theere was too have been two teams of us..one in one out!Due to location and method of entry some of the guys couldnt manage this !in the end my self and james went for it..INTERESTING ENTRY IVE HEARD THE GUYS SAY..NOT ARF'! Right very limit timed time window cos the guys who where out couldnt be waiting all night so only had an hour to do what we could and without tripod get best pics i could..tried playing with the auto focus using light up areas and then switching to manual but in the end went back to manual focus and considering the cramped flooded conditions and shortness of time i did my best..1 long exposure using some steps..right the hospital section we after wading knee deep in water and very slippy and deepening mud underfoot was aborted shame i wanted to get there..and there was a crumbling chalk fall along the liverpool lawn section so even tho i know it can be done a roof fall of the big variety wasnt sounding fun..but i got what i could in no particular order and trying to put the in focus ones in..here we go.. Doesnty look deep..it is found an old dinghy with paddle down there lol Thanks for looking and thanks to all involved..and my tripod is turning up soon..ill go somewhere that i can spend more time to get my pics looking right..last night was a struggle in dodgy conditions but fun tho
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