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Found 80 results

  1. UK Sheffield tram sheds, March 2017

    short vid of a back up splore few months back, nice artwork.
  2. History “Here in Sheffield we have a proud sporting heritage and it is important that we build upon that to create the right environment in which the sportsmen and women of the future can train, develop and thrive… But it isn’t just about the elite, it is about every man, woman and child in our city being fitter, healthier and enjoying physical activity” (Isobel Bowler, cabinet member for culture, sport and leisure at Sheffield council). Chapeltown Baths opened sometime at the beginning of the 1960s. Locally, the facility was very popular, especially among children, and many people have indicated that the place has played a big part in their lives. The baths also held regular swimming galas which always attracted large audiences as parents and guardians would flock to the stands to observe. However, despite the fondness for the centre, it was often regarded as being too small and outdated. One for the clubs that used the pool on a regular basis, for instance, had to establish a waiting list for the people wanting to join. New plans to redevelop the site into a larger, more modern, venue were launched by Sheffield Council sometime between 2010 and 2015. Plans for the new facility revealed that a two-storey extension would be added to the front of the existing building, to house a gymnasium, flexible activity/exhibition space and a community café. The aim was to create a welcoming and revitalised health and fitness centre for the local area. The main entrance was to be moved to the back of the current site where a large glazed atrium would be constructed, and, as for the pool itself, it was to be modernised and larger changing areas for both males and females were to be installed. Nevertheless, in the end the plans were scrapped as it was decided that the site was simply too small to revamp and in the long run would not offer value for money. After the original plans were abandoned, a plan to build a brand-new leisure centre was proposed. The new £7 million project was quickly accepted and construction of the facility began in 2015, up the road from the old site in High Green. The erection of the new leisure centre was said to have been one of the first leisure developments in Sheffield in over a decade. The Thorncliffe Recreation Centre is now open and most of the staff from Chapeltown Baths were said to have been moved over. Various reports suggest that the new pool is larger and has an extra lane, and that a new community has been established there. Although the new site does not have the same character, local residents generally seem happy with the new facility. As for the former Chapeltown Baths site, it has remained abandoned since the beginning of 2016. No plans have been set in stone yet; however, it is rumoured that the building will be demolished to make way for affordable housing. In the meantime, like most abandoned sites, the building has experienced increasing incidents of vandalism in recent months as local goons have managed to get their hands on a few brushes, several tins of Wilko One Coat and a box of safety matches. Smoke at the site was reported in March 2017, coming from the basement, and this resulted in the fire service being called to attend the scene. It is reported that they and had to cut their way into the building to extinguish a small fire. Fortunately, in this instance there was very little damage. As things stand presently, SCAFF Security Alarms Ltd. claim they have sealed the premises and installed various security systems to prevent any further vandalism. Our Version of Events With a couple of hours to kill before we hit some of Sheffield’s legendary pubs later that evening, we decided to pop across to Chapeltown and take a look at the old public swimming pool that had recently been brought to our attention. None of us have ever been to Chapeltown before and I can’t say we were expecting to discover anything amazing there, but one thing we did notice is that the townspeople aren’t doing themselves any favours in terms of attracting tourists to the area. For instance, there’s a large sign in the centre of the town that reads, ‘Fast trains to Sheffield and Barnsley’, implying that you should probably get going as soon as possible. However, we chose to ignore the advice and hang around for a little while instead. Finding the old swimming pool wasn’t particularly difficult. We sort of stumbled across it before needing to consult Google Maps for guidance. After that, we lingered around the bus stop that’s positioned right outside for a while, trying to work out why the metal shutter that should have been covering the main entrance looked like someone had had a go at it with a tin opener. At first, we were convinced that some incredibly ambitious explorer had decided to break in that way, rather than simply peel off a board. But, as we discovered later on, it turns out it was the firefighters who’d hacked a hole in the shutter. Even so, there was no evidence that they’d managed to get into the building that way – unless they had the keys to the building – because the front door behind it was still locked up tight. Fortunately, though, the shutter wasn’t the only opening the fire service had created. It is thanks to those guys, then, and their arsenal of cutting tools that we managed to get inside. Once inside the building, we didn’t have to worry about being spotted from the outside since all the windows at ground level had been boarded over. This made capturing images a bit easier because we could wave the torches around a bit. However, the downside to our visit was that we were a bit late getting to this one as the local goons have been inside and clearly they got a little bit overexcited. Hence why there’s a mountain of shit in the pool and broken glass everywhere. On the positive side, however, the fire damage was minimal, limited to a very small section of the basement area. In that sense, the rest of the building remains unscathed. All in all, it took us around forty minutes to cover the building from the basement to the loft. Afterwards, we left feeling satisfied that something new in Sheffield had turned up, but even more delighted that we were heading straight for The Fat Cat for no fewer than eight pints of Kelham Island’s finest and a plate of homemade curry. Many hours later, after an innumerable number of pints, two curries and several packets of peanuts, we staggered back out onto the streets of Sheffield. We were tempted to have a quick look at Minitron while we were so close, but since the lampposts on the other side of the street were swaying in a very unusual manner, we decided to call it a day and head back into town for one final pint before bed. Explored with Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27:
  3. I had a few days off last month so decided to go to Dyson. As you can see it was quite foggy which made the whole thing feel pretty creepy, solo explore as well. lotta fun. I will be doing a revisit at some point and hopefully with a drone The building, in Sheffield, closed its doors in 2006 and since then the gutted remains have been left to rust. The Dyson Group, founded by John Dyson, opened their first factory in Sheffield in 1834 at the tail end of the Industrial Revolution, before later moving to this site. Using new software to edit videos so should be a big improvement in quality!
  4. Middlewood/South Yorkshire Asylum Chapel The Explore.. Visited with @Urbexbandoned after a mooch around George Barnsley's earlier in the day and into the afternoon. Not sure what the fuck was going on with my camera but it completely died in here after only about 10 photos despite having a twin battery grip fitted and has lasted for 3 days exploring in the past. Maybe a combination of lots of long exposures/live view usage in the previous location and the very cold weather, i'll never know, but as Tracey can vouch for - I was over the moon at this development. I took some more snaps with her camera, thank you, and a few shitty ones on my phone so quite a short report. Luckily it was only a quick sniff around Loxley next as we only had about 30 mins of daylight left after being here and as you all know Loxley is a shit-hole derp. The History..(Stolen) After its closure, the land of the former Hospital was purchased for residential development by Bloor Homes. It was sold off to various other developers such as Redrow, Barratt, Harron Homes, Wimpey and PJ Livesey although Bloor’s were the major house builder for the new Wadsley Park estate which was constructed on the site of the old hospital. The Wadsley Park village consists of a mixture of houses and apartments of various sizes. Some of the old hospital structures were designated as listed buildings, the main admin block (the clock tower), Kingswood ward, the church and the porters lodge were all grade II listed and could not be demolished with the rest of the hospital. The administration building and clock tower were converted into 38 luxury apartments by Urbani after permission to demolish the building was denied and the building is now known as Middlewood Lodge. The Kingswood ward has been converted into 85 apartments by developers PJ Livesey and is known as Kingswood Hall. The porter's lodge on Middlewood Road has been refurbished and is now a nursery. The hospital church has been derelict for many years, it held its last service on 6 November 1996 to mark the closure of the hospital. In March 2012 plans were submitted by architectural design consultancy Coda Studios that may see the imposing Victorian church converted into a mixture of town houses and apartments. The scheme which needs approval from Sheffield City Council also contains proposals for a selection of partially underground eco-friendly bungalows beneath the building. The Pictures.. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  5. George Barnsley Tools The Explore I think it was a Sunday in January with @Urbexbandoned and we decided to make the shortish drive to Sheffield to have a look at this place as it seemed to have died down on the forums for the few months previous. It's now May and i'm just catching up with my shit and cursing Flickr for being a dick every time I get the motivation to post a report. We turned up early and got immediately lucky when a bloke with an early morning Maccies was entering the courtyard gates. Thanks to @Fekneejit for the information on the day, top lad and thank you. The entrance/exit was made considerably easier The History (stolen from @KarlPhoto365) George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialized in forged filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield Directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street. The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works, Cornesh street. They had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades, shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd. George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958. He lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which manufactured steel and files. The business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars. Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield. He died at the age of 83. The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4/5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Some nice posters that I walked past about five times before I noticed them up high on a wall.. 14. 15. 16. 17. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  6. The History George Barnsley and Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and then in 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street. They had by this time also increased their product range to include steel files and shoe & butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades, shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd. The Explore Having seen this quite a lot but very few and far between at the same time this was one place that I wanted to see. The same applied to @hamtagger. One not so cold February morning we made our way to Sheffield with Mr Barnsley's Cornish works in sight. Firstly thanks to @Fekneejit if it wasn't for you we would have probably been pounced on by squatters, wandering aimlessly around a courtyard continuing our debate on where the squatter we followed in had gone or even worse, slipped on a mouldy orange and be lost forever in the lonesome little area that aided us with getting in. Anyway, we got in. Walking through the first few bits it was difficult to see how this was going to turn in to something amazing. But lo and behold we carried on, getting excited over retro wallpaper and seeing familiar names etched in to the dirt on the windows we found what we had been looking for. We both got quite carried away. Spotting things that we had both seen in previous reports and some stuff that we hadn't. It was quite noticeable in areas where things had been moved, gone missing or just ruined. Wandering off in different directions and then swapping to not get in each others way. It was a great day and I am pretty pleased to have finally seen George Barnsley & Son. Anyway, on with the pics 1 2 3 - Everyone should be a lover of shit retro wallpaper 4 5 6 - I loved these, a real slice of history and nice to see along with a lot of the place not trashed. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Thanks for looking!
  7. History A bit of a mish mash as I couldn't find much just on the Chapel but this is what I did find. After its closure, the land of the former Hospital was purchased for residential development by Bloor Homes. It was sold off to various other developers such as Redrow, Barratt, Harron Homes, Wimpey and PJ Livesey although Bloor’s were the major house builder for the new Wadsley Park estate which was constructed on the site of the old hospital. The Wadsley Park village consists of a mixture of houses and apartments of various sizes. Some of the old hospital structures were designated as listed buildings, the main admin block (the clock tower), Kingswood ward, the church and the porters lodge were all grade II listed and could not be demolished with the rest of the hospital. The administration building and clock tower were converted into 38 luxury apartments by Urbani after permission to demolish the building was denied and the building is now known as Middlewood Lodge. The Kingswood ward has been converted into 85 apartments by developers PJ Livesey and is known as Kingswood Hall. The porter's lodge on Middlewood Road has been refurbished and is now a nursery. The hospital church has been derelict for many years, it held its last service on 6 November 1996 to mark the closure of the hospital. In March 2012 plans were submitted by architectural design consultancy Coda Studios that may see the imposing Victorian church converted into a mixture of town houses and apartments. The scheme which needs approval from Sheffield City Council also contains proposals for a selection of partially underground eco-friendly bungalows beneath the building. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger , we had allready been on one explore in Sheffield and were running out of daylight hours so needed one that wasn't going to take long. I had seen the post @Paulpowers had posted on this little chapel and liked the look of it. Not much left to it really but what I did see was nice. The initial thought I had when seeing it was it looked like a really gloomy church. Almost hidden beneath greenery you could see the spire and top poking out as we approached. Entry was relatively easy. The ground had been dug out inside with channels in between each Column. I am assuming they do this to see what the foundations are like. Actually I didn't assume this. HT told me and I just thought it would make me a little more intelligent haha! The structure is pretty sound, quite sad to see how much graf and vandalism this place has had. It's always quite sad to see someone deface the 'house of god'. Not that I am religious or anything but more respectful if anything. There are some wonderful stained glass windows in here, especially the one which was placed in there just after World War II. Anyway, not much left to say on this place. 1: The Exterior 2: The inside looking back from the Altar 3: 4: 5: The right Transept windows 6: The remains of the Organ 7: The Original flooring, mostly covered in Pigeon Shit 8: One of the few remaining Stained Glass windows 9: The part I liked the most, still 100% intact too. A little slice of history
  8. A cool night of climbing in Sheff with @-Raz- and a none member Butters Taken from the roof of Park Hill Flats Bit of History; The Cathedral Church of St Marie is the Roman Catholic cathedral in Sheffield, England. It lies in a slightly hidden location, just off the main shopping street in the city, but signals its presence with a 220ft tall spire. St Marie’s was completed in 1850 and opened on 11 September. Building the church cost more than £10,500 – a huge sum in those days – and it was not until 1889 that the church was free from debt. The Parish of St Marie’s, which covered the whole of Sheffield, became part of the Diocese of Beverley when Catholic diocese were re-established for the first time since the Reformation in 1850. In 1902 a new presbytery, now known as Cathedral House, was opened. During the Second World War a bomb blew out stained glass windows in the Blessed Sacrament chapel. The remaining windows were removed and stored in a shaft at Nunnery Colliery. The mine flooded during the war, the glass sunk in mud and drawings for re‑creating the windows were destroyed, however it was still possible to re-install the windows in 1947. When St Marie’s was re-ordered in 1970, following Vatican II, dark woodwork was removed and new lighting and benches were installed. In 1972, a new altar, allowing mass to be celebrated versus populum, was consecrated by Bishop Gerald Moverley, auxiliary Bishop of Leeds. The church building has been a Grade II listed building since 1973. On 30 May 1980 the new diocese of Hallam was created and St. Marie’s became a cathedral. Bishop Moverley was installed as its first bishop and served until his death in 1996. The Explore; So on a cold and windy Sunday night, having just ot my car back from repair, it was decided that this needed to be done. Parking on Park Hill we made our way to the roof for a quick warm up which turned out to be a cool down as it was fking freezing. A few quick shots from the top and we headed on down, but before leaving we popped our heads into the service tunnels, but i have a video of this so i'll leave that for another report Fast foward an hour, we are sat in McDonalds after having been foiled by passing pedestrians. Wolfing down burgers and sipping at those Vanilla Latte things they do which are simply brilliant! Enough about food. We arrive outside the church and its all quiet, so over the fence we go, pausing only on the other side for a man to pass by and we remain unnoticed. A few flights of stairs and we hit the roof, to find some people on the ground looking curiously at the fence, but they soon move on. Then came the punishing part, more ladders than i cared to count. Cold enough that your hards are numb within seconds and the higher we went the worse it got. As did the wind, as we neared the top we could feel the whole structure swaying beneath us in the breeze. Great fun. From the top we noticed 3 figures on a nearby rooftop, closer inspection reveals them to be the guys who were checking the Cathedral out as we were on the roof! Whoever you were boys, a pleasure to meet you And heres the pics; Thanks for looking
  9. Quick Intro to myself

    Good Evening Everyone, Just a quick intro to myself, my name is Ben, and im the Photographer at B T Frewin Photography, hence my profile name, and i currently live in Rotherham. I am pretty much new to the whole urbex scene, but have a ton of experience with my camera and love a good explore. Im just reaching out to fellow rotherham/sheffield urban explores/photographers who wouldnt mind meeting oneday to explore new places and exsisting ones and hopefully get me fully into this. If so, drop me a messege. Cheers.
  10. The Visit I was told about this place by some pensioner explorers who loved the street art around Sheffield, set off the week after to have a look for ourselves. Set in a lovely little village, not much left inside now but some amazing street art in there! The History The water works was built in 1913 to filter and treat water taken from the Dale Dike (the cause of the 1864 great flood of Sheffield),and Agden reservoirs in the nearby Loxley Valley. The water works was cutting edge technology in it's time and it even had the first telephone to be installed in Bradfield back in 1930 apparently. In 1974 the Yorkshire Water Authority took over and then during the Thatcher government some years later, the entire UK water industry was privatised with the Water Act of 1989. The pumping house at Lower Bradfield was abandoned in 1994 when a new pump house and processing plant was built Further down the Loxley valley. According to the locals the building attracts unwanted visitors and is a constant eyesore and a morbid reminder of Lower Bradfields grim past. The only small remaining hints of the buildings past Now some stripped out rooms.. And finally, some of the best street art I've ever seen... Oh.. and a fun looking pigeon
  11. History Minitron is a short culvert that lies beneath Kelham Island. The entire island on which the brewery is now located is man-made, resulting from mill race in the 12th century (around 1180) when water from the River Don was required for power. The goit was created to carry water from the River Don all the way to Lady’s Bridge, where the Town Corn Mill – which belonged to the Lord of the Manor – was located. Only a small section continues to exist today. It is rumoured that the island is named after Kellam Homer, the town’s armourer and smithy in 1637 who owned a small workshop on the land. Homer was able to expand his premises on account of the goit, as he was able to set up a waterwheel for his grinding workshop on the island. In later years the diverted section of the river was also used to supply power to a number of other metalwork factories which emerged in the same area as the former corn mill. By the 1800’s, as the city of Sheffield expanded, the Kelham Island area and the island itself became a host for many different manufacturers. John Crowley was one notable figure who purchased the island in 1829. A small iron foundry, known as the Kelham Island Works, was constructed on the site and the premises soon became a popular producer of iron products; these ranged from things as diverse as lawn mowers, bicycles, corn grinders and decorative items. Due to the success of his business, Crowley moved to the Meadow Hall area in 1870. The site was subsequently bought by the City in the 1890s and most of the Iron Works Buildings were demolished to make way for an electricity generating station, to provide power to the City’s new tram system. During this time major changes occurred across the city and much of the original goit was redeveloped. The remaining sections were culverted over time, particularly after the 1930s when the power station was closed down, and the same buildings steadily became workshops and storage space once again. Those formers buildings now house the Kelham Island Museum and Brewery. Our Version of Events Like several others in Sheffield who have managed to get this explore under their belts, I’d been putting it off for a very long time. At one point I used to pass it most days of the week, but for some reason it still didn’t grab my attention enough to make it a priority. I think it’s was the scanty size of it that made me push this one under the carpet for so long. Nevertheless, one afternoon I randomly decided I really fancied seeing what it actually looked like down there. So, the very next day; a particularly rainy day at that, straight after work, I grabbed Soul, my waders and a camera and went to have a peek. When we arrived the area was still quite busy owing to the nearby pubs and coffee shops, so I can’t imagine we went unnoticed as we wadered up and climbed into the goit. Other than that, access was reasonably straightforward. Once inside we expected the first section to be fairly easy-going, which it was. It was further on where we imagined that we would face some difficulty, in the first open section where a fair amount of foliage has grown. This too, however, was easier to get through than we’d anticipated. Before we knew it we were inside Minitron itself, and to begin with the walk was pleasant; both ankle deep and flat. As we progressed forwards though, we suddenly became very aware of the silt, and the fact that every step we took forward, the deeper it seemed to get. At this stage you couldn’t stand around too long since the silty muck held onto our waders tightly. It took some wrestling and pulling to get ourselves unstuck every now and then. On the whole Minitron is a classic old-brick-style underworld with some contemporaneous spray-over concrete repair work, and, while it lacks any real length, its large arches are certainly something to see. The very end offers a little treat too, past the second opening, when you reach the modern diversion which leads into the River Don. At the end of this modern pipe you reach two metal gates which open out onto the river itself and from here the views are pretty cool. I’d always wondered if there was anything under the canopy-like structure by the side of the river. Now, I guess I know exactly what’s there. Explored with Soul. 1: Entering Minitron 2: The First Open Section 3: The First Stone Archway 4: A Side Passageway 5: Minitron 6: Looking Back at the Two Arches 7: Soul Enjoying Himself 8: The Concrete Spray-Over Section 9: Concrete 10: The Second Open Section 11: Entering the Newer Section 12: The Fall 13: The New Concrete Section 14: Trying to Dodge Many Spiders... 15: The River Don 16: The Finale: The Two Gates
  12. The Visit This was unfortunately one of them explores that has lots of potential but somehow just doesn't live up to expectations. See what you guys think anyway The History This old school building was designed by the architects Innocent and Brown and opened in 1875. In 2003 the school was moved to a new, purpose-built building on Andover Street, built on the former St Catherine's RC Primary School site. The original school building is now Grade II listed. It stands in a prominent position on the hillside with great views across the city with plans to convert it into apartments.
  13. The Visit I've been wanting to see this place for a while now and just never got around to going over.. seemed to be a day of tight squeezes after the church in Leeds but we got in OK.. a lot of the actual industrial gear is gone now unfortunately but the offices, medical rooms and air raid shelter are quite interesting and worth a look I'd say.. Running water still on was a nice touch and able to have a nice wash before we left The History Sheffield manufacturing firm that collapsed into administration with the loss of nearly 80 jobs owes more than £500,000 to creditors, it has been revealed. More than 140 local and national companies are owed money in the wake of the collapse of Castmaster Roll, based at the Eagle Foundry in Attercliffe. The business went into administration in October and as no new buyer could be found, all 78 workers have lost their jobs and the firm’s assets are being sold. The firm had reported a trading loss for three years in a row before going into administration, including a £400,000 loss for the year ending January 31, 2014. Details included in the papers of administrator KPMG show £502,353 was owed to different companies at the time of administration. The report said delayed and non-payment of invoices had put the company under ‘significant pressure from its creditors’ in the months prior to administration. A report also reveals that between KPMG’s appointment in October and December 5, it claimed costs of more than £324,000 for handling the administration. KPMG said it is uncertain how much money – if any – will be returned to unsecured creditors as a sale of assets is yet to be concluded. Administrators have also said they are ‘continuing to assess the causes of the company’s failure’. It comes after Sheffield MP Clive Betts called for a ‘thorough investigation’ into how Castmaster Roll failed. The Sheffield South East MP said staff had told him the company appeared to be in good shape before it went into administration. He said: “I’m calling on the administrators to undertake a thorough investigation into how a company with good order books and more orders coming through the door has sadly managed to get into such difficulties.†The firm produced iron and steel quality rolls, discs and sleeves for the manufacturing and food processing industry. The Stevenson Road site began making gas lamps more than a century ago and became a roll maker about 95 years ago. It was known as the Davy Roll company but, after going into receivership, it was reborn as Castmaster Roll in the mid-2000s, taken over by new owner Mel Farrar. The Industrial Areas Offices, Medical Room and Air Raid Shelter
  14. The Visit Having tried this one a few months back with Funlester and being completely baffled by how to get in the place I returned with a non member armed with a little more intel and determination paid off this time This is one of those explores that you really can feel the history of the place I thought.. can just imagine what a hive of activity it must have been in its day. The History George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world's leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley's survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed.
  15. This was the first stop when we spent the day around Sheffield, 5 tried 5 entered. History - Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. Waingate in 1857: the Old Town Hall with its first clock tower on the left The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk.
  16. This was our last spot on our day in Sheffield and for myself love places like this but wasnt that much in there History - Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here Today the Graveyard and associated land is poorly maintained (it seems to be a theme in Sheffield graveyards).
  17. We came across this after some old dears on a different site pointed us towards it. Empty but some nice art work. History - The works on Shepherd Street were founded by William Ridgeway in the 1930s. William Ridgeway merged first of all with Record Tools in 1974. Record were another Sheffield company who were renowned for the quality of their vices and industrial clamps. Following the merger with Record Ridgway Tools Ltd and was made up off 14 UK Companies with 5 overseas companies. The remaining packaging in the works refers to Record Marple which was a brand formed with the merger of the Record Ridgeway and Marple companies (which was part-owned by Record and and Ridgeway respectively before their merger). Marple made various woodworking tools. Record Ridgway was taken over by the Swedish hardware manafacturer AB Bahco in 1982. Although a management buyout led to the company reverting to British ownership in 1985 the company struggled financially and following administration was acquired by U.S. based Irwin Tools in 1998 who've moved production to China in recent years.
  18. This place has now been turn in to an Airsoft building so tyres everywhere and not much else apart from the main door. History - What is now known as The Stanley Tools Factory, Sheffield was built in the 1850’s. At the moment it is derelict awaiting refurbishment. It is 100,000 Sq.ft in size and is spread over a 4 floor factory and a 2 floor office block. Stanley Tools took over from the Chapman Brace and Drill Factory in 1937. The site has been used as a film set recently and has also been used for zombie experiences due to the size of the location.
  19. This was one of the sites we did on a full day in Sheffield. We bumped in to come pensioners at this site who explore but mainly for the street art. History Stones Brewery (William Stones Ltd) was a regional brewery founded in 1868 by William Stones in Sheffield, West Riding of South Yorkshire, England and purchased by Bass Brewery in 1968. After its closure in 1999 its major brand, Stones Bitter, has continued to be produced by the Molson Coors Brewing Company.
  20. This was the 3rd stop on our trip on Sunday. Was ok but then found the First Aid Room and the Air Raid Shelter Thing History - A Sheffield manufacturing firm that collapsed into administration with the loss of nearly 80 jobs owes more than £500,000 to creditors, it has been revealed. More than 140 local and national companies are owed money in the wake of the collapse of Castmaster Roll, based at the Eagle Foundry in Attercliffe. The business went into administration in October and as no new buyer could be found, all 78 workers have lost their jobs and the firm’s assets are being sold. The firm had reported a trading loss for three years in a row before going into administration, including a £400,000 loss for the year ending January 31, 2014. Details included in the papers of administrator KPMG show £502,353 was owed to different companies at the time of administration. The report said delayed and non-payment of invoices had put the company under ‘significant pressure from its creditors’ in the months prior to administration. A report also reveals that between KPMG’s appointment in October and December 5, it claimed costs of more than £324,000 for handling the administration. KPMG said it is uncertain how much money – if any – will be returned to unsecured creditors as a sale of assets is yet to be concluded. Administrators have also said they are ‘continuing to assess the causes of the company’s failure’. It comes after Sheffield MP Clive Betts called for a ‘thorough investigation’ into how Castmaster Roll failed. The Sheffield South East MP said staff had told him the company appeared to be in good shape before it went into administration. He said: “I’m calling on the administrators to undertake a thorough investigation into how a company with good order books and more orders coming through the door has sadly managed to get into such difficulties.†The firm produced iron and steel quality rolls, discs and sleeves for the manufacturing and food processing industry. The Stevenson Road site began making gas lamps more than a century ago and became a roll maker about 95 years ago. It was known as the Davy Roll company but, after going into receivership, it was reborn as Castmaster Roll in the mid-2000s, taken over by new owner Mel Farrar.
  21. Be rude not to have a look at this place, I was passing. The main entrance was blocked by RTC and police so a good old rough rear entry was in order. Bet this was stunning in its day. Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here. The accompanying graveyard has also been abandoned, though wondering through you can clearly see well walked paths to some clean/not so forgotten loved ones graves. In its later life, the chapel became known as the Loxley United Reformed / Independent Church. It is a grade 2 listed building and has been on English Heritage at risk register since August 1985. Thanks for looking guys and gals
  22. History “The architecture and much of the decoration of St. Marie’s cathedral uses designs and motifs from English churches built before the Reformationâ€. The Cathedral Church of St. Marie is an English Roman Catholic Cathedral, located in Sheffield city centre. It was designed by Matthew Ellison Hadfield, a Victorian Gothic Revival architect who was well-known for his work on Roman Catholic churches, and constructed between 1846 and 1850. Before the cathedral was constructed, a smaller chapel existed on the same site; this was known as Sheffield’s Medieval Parish Church of St. Peter. During the reign of Henry VIII, St. Peter’s was destroyed and most of the Catholic priests were hunted down and murdered or imprisoned. The congregation, too, were socially excluded and faced loss of property and possessions. By the late 18th Century, however, Catholics were able to worship more freely in Sheffield (though not completely) and, subsequently, a small group of priests purchased a house (The Lord’s House which was built by the Duke of Norfolk) on the corner of Fargate and Norfolk Row; this was close to where the cathedral now stands. A new small chapel was discretely constructed in the back garden and the remaining land became a cemetery in later years when Catholic’s were legally allowed to practice their religion. Some parts of the original building continue to exist to this day. By 1846, the chapel was deemed too small for the number of worshippers attending on a regular basis, therefore, Fr. Pratt - a young priest who was becoming increasingly prominent in Sheffield – sought out Hadfield to design a larger building that could cater for the expanding city. Hadfield used the design of a 14th Century church in Heckington, Lincolnshire, to sketch plans for a new site of worship. Upon completion the church was expensively decorated; courtesy of the Duke of Norfolk, who supported the project with money and additional generous ornamental donations. Unfortunately, Fr. Pratt never witnessed the completion of the church because he died on 17th February 1849 (aged 38) whilst it was still being constructed. His body was initially buried at St. Bede’s, in Rotherham, along with all of the other people who were moved from the original cemetery. Yet, in spite of the decision to move Pratt to Bede’s, a stonemason, who had often heard Pratt suggest that he wanted to be buried at St. Marie’s, decided to secretly dig up the coffin and rebury it in a tomb near the newly positioned altar inside St. Marie’s. To this day, the body had remained in that same location. As above, St. Marie’s was completed in 1950 and it officially opened on September 11th. The cost of the church exceeded £10,500 and, despite the Duke’s support, it took almost forty years to pay off the debt. The Parish of St. Marie’s, which covered the whole of Sheffield, became part of the Diocese of Beverley in the same year when the Catholic Diocese were re-established for the first time since the Reformation. Like most churches and chapels, St. Marie’s was extended in later years (1902) as the congregation continued to grow. During the Second World War, however, all progress halted when a bomb blew out a number of the stained glass windows. To prevent the remaining ones from being destroyed, the church decided to remove the glass and store it in a shaft inside Nunnery Colliery for the duration of the war. In spite of these efforts, the mine flooded after unusually heavy rainfall and the stained glass sunk in mud; the drawings were also all destroyed. In 1947, however, some of the windows were rediscovered and the church were able to restore them. The church became a listed building in 1973, and later, on May 30th 1980, the New Diocese of Hallam was created; meaning St. Marie’s became a cathedral. Initially, St. Marie’s had been part of the Diocese of Leeds. Bishop Moverley was placed as its first bishop and he served until his death in 1996. Thereafter, Bishop Rt. Rev. Ralph Heskett was installed as the second Bishop of Hallam. Recently St. Marie’s has been awarded a Heritage Lottery Funded grant to conserve its heritage. The project will allow the conservation and long term preservation of the unaltered 19th Century Lewis organ, the highly decorated Victorian wall tiles and the 15th Century alabaster panels. Our Version of Events After a little wander around Sheffield, to see if the sites have changed at all, we spotted some new scaff and this time it was around the cathedral! Instantaneously, we gave in to temptation and set about creating some sort of plan. Ten minutes later, with the plan in full effect, we sat and enjoyed a beer and some food; waiting for the cover of darkness. After a few hours of that, later on that same evening, we set off once again, back to the cathedral. Once we arrived outside, we had to make sure we timed our entry carefully, in between passing pedestrians, but somehow we managed it without being seen. Although it’s normally quite quiet in Sheffield city centre, on this night everyone seemed to be out for a walk. After that we focused on climbing to the top. The climb itself wasn’t particularly challenging, but since you feel quite exposed as you get higher the thrill is certainly there. We did attempt to hide in the shadows where shadows were available, however, since it was a very clear night, there weren’t many around. At the top we were able to access the actual tower itself and could walk around the entire thing; this meant that we were able to see the old gargoyles and decorative features close up. The tower of the cathedral offers some fantastic views of Sheffield; yet another vantage point from which we could gaze at the city below. And yet, despite the awesome views, the highlight for myself was when the old clock bells chimed at a certain hour: they were loud and gave us a good taste of their music. Explored with Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  23. So it was about time I had a look at this Megatron. With research done I was unsure about a few things, so thanks to Mr H for helping out. As I neared my chosen entry, what could I see, yes workman working directly where I needed to be. So of across Sheffield I trotted to find another. I had a good look around, paddling up and down stream. Glad to of seen it. Short history as you have heard it all before and I have bored you enough already. Below Park Hill, the train station and Ponds Forge - three rivers meet in a Victorian-engineered subterranean cathedral, built to protect the city from devastating floods. A soaring arc of brick, these huge vaulted tunnels were built in the 1860s as culverts and storm drains for the Sheaf, Don and Porter Brook rivers. They converge in the middle of Sheffield and after heavy rain they would frequently flood the centre of the young industrial city in the nineteenth century. Thanks for looking guys and gals
  24. History Castmaster Roll, which has operated for over one hundred years, is a former foundry and manufacturing firm located in Sheffield. It was originally known as Davy Roll, the producer of gas lamps, but was renamed in 2003 after it was taken over by Mel Farrar. Castmaster specialised in rollmaking and later became a specialist producer of rolls for the steel industry; for rod, bar, light and medium sections and billet, narrow strip and tube mill applications. Rolls were also produced for the non-ferrous and food processing industries. The company were proud to have supplied Reeling and Roller Straightening in a comprehensive range of steel, adamite, iron and special alloy grades, up to a maximum roll size of 1,150mm diameter by 4,300mm long, with a delivered weight of 12,000 kilos. By December 2014, administrators were forced to admit that the historic Sheffield foundry was in severe financial difficulty; they warned that the company would fall into administration in 2015. True to their word, Castmaster Roll was dissolved in the early months of 2015, with the loss of 78 jobs. It was revealed, in February 2015, that the firm owed more than £500,000 to creditors; over 140 local and national companies are still owed money in the wake of the collapse of the company and it remains uncertain whether any money will be returned to unsecure creditors. Many people were stunned that the company, which had been successful for many years, had managed to get into this position. Everyone in steel and manufacturing industry across Sheffield were even more shocked when Castmaster Roll was finally forced to close its doors forever. Castmaster Roll was one of the last remaining European suppliers of rolls in the UK Our Version of Events This little piece of Sheffield’s formerly booming steel industry only just recently came to my attention, despite having passed it on several occasions this year. It seems that even though the lights were on and the building appeared to be fully functioning, it has deceived everyone temporarily; it has been, for a little while now, abandoned. Regrettably, I was a little late for this one, as demolition has already begun – presumably to redevelop the area into industrial units, or as a base for another company – and some of its key features have been removed. However, there was still fun to be had and I feel that it was well worth a wander over. Although the machine shop has been entirely stripped and the foundry is slowly disappearing, the medical room, air-raid shelter, offices and washhouses are still in excellent condition, so there is certainly still plenty to see. *A special thanks is owed to ACID-REFLUX for this one; cheers for the heads up and being a detailed source of info. Castmaster Roll The Foundry High Voltage Areas The Machine Shop
  25. For around a year id been saying to myself i must do Masticator and Megatron but id never gotten around to it. However last month i got them both done with a little help from Raz, Jord & ACID- REFLUX. So we shall start in date order, with the Masticator. Bit of History; The Meanwood Beck (Masticator) is a stream in West Yorkshire, England, which flows through Adel, Meanwood and Sheepscar into the River Aire in central Leeds. The same watercourse has been referred to as Addle Beck, Carr Beck, Lady Beck, Mabgate Beck, Sheepscar Beck, Timble Beck or Wortley Beck. The beck was previously a source of water for the village of Headingley and two of its earliest bridges led straight to it. The beck carries a much reduced volume of water over recent years as water is collected instead into the many drains in the centre of one of Britain's largest cities. Meanwood Beck runs through Meanwood Park and Woodhouse Ridge. It provides water and drainage for Meanwood Valley Urban Farm. In the 16th to 18th centuries it provided power for corn mills. In the 19th century it supplied water for a chemical works and tanneries, one of which, Sugarwell Court, is now a university hall of residence. The Beck suffered a serious pollution incident on 29 March 1999 when an oil tank at the University of Leeds' Bodington Hall was overfilled and 10,000 litres of oil flowed into the beck. It is also a habitat for the indigenous European crayfish, which is currently threatened in the UK by a plague carried by the Signal crayfish introduced from America. As well as the crayfish there is also bull head fish present which can be found easily with a net and a pair of waders; they generally are located on the stream bed in the mud and silt. The Meanwood Valley Trail footpath follows the line of the beck for much of its course however once it flows underground things get very interesting. And on to the Megatron. Another lil bit of hist; “Deep underneath Sheffield City Centre – below Park Hill, the train station and Ponds Forge – three rivers meet in a Victorian-engineered subterranean cathedral, built to protect the city from devastating floods”. Megatron, as most people now know is a large underground storm drain, which was constructed in the mid-1800s. The land on which Sheffield Midland Station was built in 1870, alongside various cutlers and silversmiths, was originally marshy and insalubrious, owing to the Porter Brook and the River Sheaf which run through that part of the city, and for this reason it was prone to regular flooding. To create solid foundations both rivers were partially covered; these drains would then frequently flood after heavy rains, protecting the rest of the growing industrial city of Sheffield. The manipulation of the rivers also served to benefit various mills and steel factories which required large quantities of water to function. The tunnel system remained a hidden secret for many years; a mysterious rumour amongst the general public since only a few Yorkshire Water engineers ever went down there. In an effort to keep the rest of society out of the system the rumour was reportedly extended, to convince everyone that full respiratory equipment was required if anyone ever desired to enter into the depths. (History shamelessly stolen from Wildboyz - Hope you dont mind matey ) Explore; A very good weekend this was, Myself and Raz mooched down to Sheffield to meet a well known explorer and the king of sarcasm ACID- REFLUX. i must say after seeing him shoot down so many people in such epic ways over on 28DL i was very apprehensive about this meet but as it turns out there was nothing to be worried about in fact i can now actually use my camera so cheers for the help mate Spent a few hours down here whilst waiting for Wildboyz to finish work and then off to a pub in the Derbyshire Dales to meet the rest of the gang Heres some more from Le Megatron... ACID- REFLUX in action So this is normally where i put thanks for looking, feel free to like/comment, look at my page ect blah blah blah but today ill leave you with this; "Is the river really beautiful or is it just the gradient of the land?"
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