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Found 16 results

  1. Worthen Farmhouse The Explore This was from last April. I can't remember a huge amount about this location as myself and @Urbexbandoned had spent the weekend further south in Wales and we were working our way back up to this area before heading back home. There was a farmer bumming about in a tractor right across the road spreading his animal shite around the place, but from memory it was a nice easy and relaxed mooch. Out in the back garden area there was various abandoned cars and and a couple of old tractors, which were nice to look at, especially the old 3.3 litre Vauxhall Cresta. The History History on this place is pretty vague unfortunately and all that i could find through extensive research (copied from Tracey's report @Urbexbandoned) is that "the former resident passed away some time ago and apparently her son couldn't bring himself to sell the house or sort it out so it has been left to decay naturally." The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4/5. 6. 7. Bedpans are useful eh? 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. The Vauxhall Cresta 3.3 Litre Straight Six (Thanks to Hamtagger Senior for the vehicle ID ) 20. That's it, thanks for taking the time to have a look and feedback always appreciated
  2. History I don't have much history on this place. I now that the former resident passed away some time ago and apparently her son couldn't bring himself to sell the house or sort it out so it has been left to decay naturally. The Explore Visited with my better half @hamtagger , we had been meaning to visit this place for some time but with other places popping up we had decided to hit this on the way back from a weekend in Wales. Nicely situated this, set away from any prying eyes but then we noticed the tractor in the field opposite who had his eyes on us, Didn't give us any trouble and when his back was turned we quickly made our way in. One thing I love about cottages and old houses is that when places are littered with articles like they are here it gives you a really nice picture to work with as to what the person was like that lived here. This place, aside from looking like it had been a little ransacked was no exception. There were momento's, photographs and personal belongings everywhere. The cars are as they have been Iv'e seen in previous reports and we even found some Insurance covernotes which matched some of the cars out back. Nice little touch. A lot of pics I have seen from here have been a bit samey so I wanted to focus on other bits I'd found. I found it quite interesting how one side of the house was literally being held on by wallpaper, there were massive cracks running right down. Pushed it a little, it wobbled, I left it alone Anyway, on with the pics Cheers for lookin!
  3. The Visit A very early morning start with redhunter, Funlester and a non member. Bumped into a farmer who asked what we were doing but some quick thinking that we were looking for some high ground to photograph the morning mist over the fields worked a treat and he left wishing us good luck! This is a great explore and some fantastic features inside, real shame we couldn't access the basement but a great explore otherwise The History This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname 'House of Tears' comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside.
  4. History: This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname 'House of Tears' comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside. Explore: Wanted to visit this one for a while, and after me and redhunter convinced loocyloo to pull a sickie and come with us, we were soon on our way up to Shropshire. After a while we gained access in probably the most awkward way possible, but hey we were in! Our exit was a little less dignified, with loocyloo getting stuck on the edge of a wall, and some top class bull from redhunter about how we found the place when confronted by angry farmers. "found it on the British heritage website, and no we definitely haven't been inside" actually worked?!? after threatening to confiscate our cameras and some strong protest from us they went to check the alarms, at which point we made a hasty exit through a field of not so happy cows.. On with some pictures i got from not going inside.. and to finish up, one i actually took from the outside!
  5. This was a full fun visit and a lovely tricky one to get in to. History Brogyntyn Hall was constructed in 1975. It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the houses of the gentry in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family, Lord Harlech. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.
  6. Pitchford Hall The Explore Visited with Urbexbandoned And thanks to Lenston for the help and information leading up to this one mate So, we got up early-ish and set off on the 2 1/2 hour drive from lincoln to Shrewsbury. Weather looked pretty wank as we left and I decided to chin off taking a pair of shorts and dressed in black combats and black T-shirt, a decision I later regretted. A bit of cross country hiking, over a little stream then across a wider part... quite a bit of rain the night before made it a little deeper and faster flowing than we had expected; my sealskinz socks proved their worth yet again and Urbexbandoned went for the butterfly stroke across the amazon By this time the sun was splitting the skies and I was fucking boiling dressed in all black like i was about to storm the Iranian embassy with a minime rather than storm an old stately home with a camera. Tracey changed into tiny shorts to get cooled down and i stood there sweating and regretting my earlier decision to chin off packing my mankini Took a long fucking time to get into this place, a good four hours to be exact. Fresh padlocks all over the place along with newly laminated signs attached to doors and gates saying "private do not enter" or some shit like that. Treehouse with a nice new padlock too, gutted. After me having a huff and giving Urbexbandoned the "why the fuck does this always happen to me" speech, I was swiftly told to stop being a drama queen and lets get this place done, so I picked up my teddies and re-applied my mascara, then had another walk around and found a place to pretty much un-gracefully skydive down a 15 foot wall and we found our entry.. After about 3 hours uninterrupted mooching around this cracking location we were just about to leave when an old and initially rather angry bloke appeared, an apparent keyholder too. We stood apologetically and listened to his bollocking about "bloody urban explorers' and how he had caught some careless people the day before and had dispatched his mate to B and Q to buy more padlocks and bolts to seal the place up. He also said he had been on the internet that morning and seen pictures of this at the time "NP" location. Whoever that was, nice one knobhead for burning the place and also to the bellend who parked right outside the adjacent occupied houses a few days previous to our visit #ninja_as_fuck The History (burgled from Raz) Pitchford Hall is Grade I listed and one of England's finest Elizabethan half timbered houses. The first record of the estate is in the Domesday Book (1081 - 86) Historical records relate that a mediaeval manor house existed somewhere on the site from at least 1284 to 1431 and it is possible that portions of the earlier house may survive within the fabric of the west wing. Soon after the three wings were completed a garderobe tower was added to the north east corner, overlooking the brook and rolling parkland. Many of the 16th century arrangements have been altered by successive waves of taste and need, with the exception of the drawing room where the paneling and ceiling are amongst the finest of their type and date back to 1626. Some time after the Dissolution of the Monasteries (during the reign of Henry VIII) and when Roman Catholics were being persecuted for their religious beliefs, a Priest's Hole was installed in the house. Prince Rupert is said to have hidden there from the Parliamentarians. Some of the more famous guests to stay at Pitchford over the years include Queen Victoria who as Princess Victoria, aged 13 was entertained at the Hall in 1832 by the then owner 3rd Earl of Liverpool. An extract from her diary recalls "at about twenty minutes to five we arrived at Pitchford, a curious looking but very comfortable house. It is striped black and white and in the shape of a cottage". During her stay she watched the local hunt from the Tree house. In 1935 the then Duke of York (later George VI) and his wife Queen Elizabeth (now the Queen Mother) stayed. During World War II, Pitchford was one of the houses selected as a place of safety for King George and his wife Queen Elizabeth and their daughters Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret. The operation to relocate the Royal Family to Pitchford was called the Coates Mission. The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5/6. Yet another moment when I told myself to get a fucking wide angle lens! 7. Urbexbandoned getting the angles 8. Bring me a brew, and make it snappy peasant! 9. Bit of a wank picture but we walked past this little servants panel a few times before noticing it was there.. 10. Kitchen area.. 11. Ordered a domino's from here.. 12/13. Getting wood 14. 15. Attic area.. 16. 17/18. 19. The Red window.. 20. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  7. Yet another place that nobody seems to visit unlike some of the places that are in a lot worse shape that people flock to like sheep! but anyway made for a eventful mooch with Fat Panda as usual! We arrived here to find the alarms already blaring out and after a helping hand from The_Raw with a bit of improv we found ourselves inside and greeted by the main hall, the rest of the place wasn't in bad shape but nothing of interest really! History stolen from The_Raw Shelton Hospital was custom built and opened in 1845 at Bicton Heath, Shrewsbury. The building was designed by George Gilbert Scott (the great grandfather of the architect who designed Battersea Power Station and the Red Phone Boxes, Giles Gilbert Scott) and William B Moffat. The Asylum was designed in the Corridor Layout that was prolific at the time, being symmetrical so that males and females could easily be segregated. The total cost of the original building came to £17,000. The hospital opened on the 18th of March, 1845, with a capacity of 60 patients. By the opening, the patients requiring treatment had increased to 104. At its peak in 1947, the hospital had 1027 patients. In 1968, a fire ripped through a ward killing 21 of the hospital's most severely mentally ill female patients. Most of the women were asleep and some were unable to move from their beds without assistance. The fire is thought to have been started by a discarded cigarette and it was found that none of the nurses were trained in fire evacuation procedures. A short BBC video from 1968 including interviews with a nurse and the hospital manager after the fire can be seen here: BBC News Player - 1968: Hospital blaze kills 21 Over the years the hospital had its own cricket and football sides, a band, a farm supplying food to the hospital, jobs for patients and even a brewery. In Victorian times these places were designed to be self-contained, it was an institution so people who were admitted there often ended up living there their whole lives. Often the staff also would stay there for years and their children would eventually become staff there so you would have generations of people who had worked at the same place. Some of the treatments carried out there 100 years ago would now be seen as appalling and primitive, but knowledge and understanding of mental health was not what it is today and the public’s attitudes took time to change. The grade II listed building, which has been much adapted over the more than 150 years since it opened, closed as a hospital in September 2012. Its role has now been taken over by a new mental health village nearby called The Redwoods Centre, home to around 200 patients. Shelton has now been bought by Shropshire Homes and is being turned into luxury flats, work starts in September 2014. Cheers for looking
  8. Evening all, only got a couple of bits to offer atm but got a couple of fairly interesting things in the pipeline which look promising, hope everyone's had a good weekend and not too down about going back to work tomorrow. Here is one of said bits, Pitchford hall, what a bloody lovely building! This is probably one of, if not, my favourite explores mainly down the fact that i'm an oak frame carpenter myself and build houses like this everyday, which I love, and also the fact that when I found it, to my knowledge I didn't know anyone else had been here. I found it whilst trawling through what felt like the 600 million churches on the heritage at risk register for shropshire and when I googled the place for explorers reports I found nothing. So yeah as soon as I saw a 500 yr old oak framed house, tagged vacant and in a state of disrepair on HARR, less than an hour from me, with a 300 yr old tree house there was no way I wasn't paying it a visit! I love seeing old timber frames like this, as I say pitchford hall is about 500 years old and I love the thought of the houses I build being around in 500 years time, I always like carving my name and the year into the timbers where it will be hidden somewhere in the hope someone will read it in god knows how long and go, wonder who the hell Jake was and what the hell WOZ EAR! means, I found an outline of a shoe with a name etched into some lead and dated 1846 on the top of brogyntyn hall, love stuff like that, proper little personal connection with you and one of the craftsmen that put the place there, amazing stuff. Anyways on with the show. The explore. This was a solo mission for me, one that put me off solo missions a little actually as I went ass over tit down the mossy stone stairs at the front of the house, I blame not having my lucky boots on, I always explore in my boots and this time I forgot, as I thought it was just a reccy and ended having to traverse a stream, slipped down some steps and then got caught up in an extremely boggy stretch of the estate which nearly engulfed one of my adidases, is there such thing as plural for adidas?? Anyway yeah this was one of those that starts off as a reccy and before you know it your inside with less than 1/4 of a camera battery and whole bloody house to get around! First thing I did was tick off the tree house, if nothing else just so I can say I chilled out in the same tree house that queen victoria used to frequent as a princess, bust that one out at your next dinner party over a nice salmon roulade! I took a couple of pics of the tree house and chilled out taking in the view for 5 minutes and just thought how flippin cool the situation was, then headed back to the main house and found a way inside. I was probably inside for about 2 hours or so, getting my beedy eye all over the fine wood work in the place, beautiful stairs, wood panneling, fire surrounds, all absolutely stunning, I would love to have a go at carving some of the intricate details in these features, it's basically a chippy's wet dream in there! Toffee and haste Pistory courtesy of British listed buildings Pitchford hall, Country house. Circa 1560-70 for Adam Ottley with a probably C14 or C15 core and minor C17, C18 and early C19 alterations and additions; restored, remodelled and extended in the 1870's and 1880's by George Devey (1820-86) for Charles Cotes, and further restored in the late C20. Timber framed with rendered infill panels (with red ochre colouring on the north front - probably part of Devey's restoration) on coursed red sandstone rubble plinth, squared and coursed to east; stone slate roof. E-plan around courtyard to south, service wing and courtyard to west. 2 storeys and attic, over basement to east; jettied first floors with moulded bressummers, cable-moulded shafts to first floor in gable ends, and gables have cambered tie-beams with carved vine ornament; 5 brick ridge stacks, 3 external lateral brick stacks with grey sandstone ashlarlower parts, and integral brick end stack to west, all with clustered star-shaped brick shafts. Framing: square panels (4 from sole-plate to wall-plate) with diagonal struts forming lozenge patterns, close studding beneath some windows; some close studding with middle rail and short straight corner braces. Late C19 wooden mullioned and transomed windows with leaded casements. South front: 5-window recessed centre withprojecting gabled wings; 2-storey gabled projections in re-entrant angles with carved quatrefoil frieze to first-floor middle rail; central 2-storey porch has 4-centred arched doorway with pair of half-glazed doors, and first floor with cross-window and carved quatrefoil frieze to middle rail, and probably C17 louvred bellcote in gable above with flanking carved scrolls, diagonally-placed square clock, and small shaped gablet above (finial missing). Recessed garden seat with chamfered arch in stone ground floor wall of late C19 addition to west of left-hand gabled wing. North (entrance) front: near symmetrical C16 range to left with short gabled projections and large stacks flanking central 2-storey gabled porch with first floor oriel window and chamfered ogee-arched doorway with 2 boarded doors and approached by 8 stone steps; asymmetrical late C19 remodelling of C18 or early C19 range to right in a matching style. 5-window east front with 4 gables of differing size, high plinth, and central probably C18 two-storey bow window remodelled in late C19. Service wing to west forming one side of a service courtyard together with the west wing of the E-plan part and a retaining wall (qv); one storey rendered brick and slate roofed lean-to adjoining both walls of house with glazing bar sashes, probably reset carved red sandstone shield with foliage decoration, and short open loggia with chamfered painted stone posts; wing returning to south at west end has a coursed sandstone rubble ground floor with triple segmental arches; stairs within corridor lead up to a C19 timber framed service porch opposite stable block (qv), with chamfered red brick ashlar plinth, stone slate roof, moulded bressummer to gable end, moulded barge boards, and nail-studded boarded door with decorative wrought iron strap hinges. Interior: largely C17 and late C19 in a Neo- Tudor style; hall and dining room with late C19 panelling, moulded cross-beamed ceilings and Tudor -arched stone fireplaces; drawing room with early C17 fittings including panelling, fluted Ionic pilasters, fluted frieze, moulded cross-beamed ceiling with thin ribbed plasterwork and heraldic devices in panels, and stone Tudor-arched fireplace with carved spandrels and open triangular-pedimented overmantel; ground-floor rooms in west wing of E-shaped part have C17 fireplaces with elaborately decorated overmantels; library with fireplace dated 1623; two mid-C18 fireplaces in bedrooms said to be by Pritchard, with plain and lugged architraves, friezes with masks and carved foliage decoration, and moulded cornices; L-shaped staircase of c.l700 with closed string, turned balusters and square newel post; C18 dog-leg staircase in east wing with closed string, turned balusters, ramped handrail, square newel posts, and dado panelling; early C19 staircase in service wing with stick balusters. Internal fittings of interest throughout. The remains of a former probably C15 two-bay crown-post roof are visible in the roof space over the west wing of the E-plan part (see cambered tie beams and mortices). George Devey's alterations included moving the main entrance to the north side of the house, removing the wall formerly enclosing the south side of the courtyard, and creating the present garden with its summer house (qv) and retaining walls (qv). Pitchford Hall has a very complex architectural history for which space does not permit a detailed description. And here we go with some pictures, again same day I was at Calcot hall, don't know if you read that report but I was fresh out with a new dslr and took everything that day in jpeg apologies if they come up a bit crap quality. Traditional pegged mortice and tenon joints, exactly the same as I bash pegs into all day at work, the peg hole through the tenon would be slightly off set to the peg hole in the mortice, doing this creates 'draw' so that when you drive the peg through it forces the holes to align and brings the shoulder of the joint in tighter. Like a pig in shit! Underneath this tree is where I nearly lost one of my adidaseseses And last but by no means least, ol queen viccys holiday hang out spot, which now appears to have ginger bearded knob hanging out the window flipping the bird and chaving the place up, oh well at least no one will rob your pics and flog them to the fail if its of you with your finger up in the middle of it!! :grin2: Peace out to all my brothers from another mother n all my sisters from another mister, thanks for looking. safe exploring kids.
  9. Not much Information available about this place, awesome when you get lost and find a derp, seems to be happening alot these days full of cobwebs and nothing "placed" would indicate this as being a fresh find The lack of graff and signs of pikeyness was pretty impressive there was a stale smoke smell and a few burnt corners, a nice little throwback . First snooker table found so I did take a few Not sure what these cushions things are all about?! Cheers for looking!
  10. The History Shelton Hospital was custom built and opened in 1845 at Bicton Heath, Shrewsbury. The building was designed by George Gilbert Scott (the great grandfather of the architect who designed Battersea Power Station and the Red Phone Boxes, Giles Gilbert Scott) and William B Moffat. The Asylum was designed in the Corridor Layout that was prolific at the time, being symmetrical so that males and females could easily be segregated. The total cost of the original building came to £17,000. The hospital opened on the 18th of March, 1845, with a capacity of 60 patients. By the opening, the patients requiring treatment had increased to 104. At its peak in 1947, the hospital had 1027 patients. In 1968, a fire ripped through a ward killing 21 of the hospital's most severely mentally ill female patients. Most of the women were asleep and some were unable to move from their beds without assistance. The fire is thought to have been started by a discarded cigarette and it was found that none of the nurses were trained in fire evacuation procedures. A short BBC video from 1968 including interviews with a nurse and the hospital manager after the fire can be seen here: BBC News Player - 1968: Hospital blaze kills 21 Over the years the hospital had its own cricket and football sides, a band, a farm supplying food to the hospital, jobs for patients and even a brewery. In Victorian times these places were designed to be self-contained, it was an institution so people who were admitted there often ended up living there their whole lives. Often the staff also would stay there for years and their children would eventually become staff there so you would have generations of people who had worked at the same place. Some of the treatments carried out there 100 years ago would now be seen as appalling and primitive, but knowledge and understanding of mental health was not what it is today and the public’s attitudes took time to change. The grade II listed building, which has been much adapted over the more than 150 years since it opened, closed as a hospital in September 2012. Its role has now been taken over by a new mental health village nearby called The Redwoods Centre, home to around 200 patients. Shelton has now been bought by Shropshire Homes and is being turned into luxury flats, work starts in September 2014. The Explore I already posted a report on this place a couple of months ago and called it Asylum X, here I have included more in-depth history, some different shots and some externals. Why? Because why the F*** not I believe this is the last of the Victorian asylums to close their doors, I visited with a non-member friend, with both of us having grown up in Shrewsbury we were desperate to see inside the place. The site is quite large with an impressive exterior and multiple buildings including a chapel and a farm. Practically all of the contents have been removed and everything now looks quite modern but the fact it is still in pretty much pristine condition makes it worth a visit. We explored the main building in it's entirety and just one other building which used to be a secure unit with admin offices upstairs. Access was a tricky one to figure out as the place is surrounded by an unbelievable amount of motion sensors. After a couple of failed attempts (including being caught on Christmas Day morning) and much brainstorming we figured out a way in past the sensors and spent four hours nervously creeping around knowing full well that security were inside the building with us. It's fair to say that this site was a bit personal as we both knew people who spent time in there, in fact I knew a guy who ended his life in there by hanging himself in the secure unit. That was a long time ago but it still creeps me out and it added a sinister edge to seeing the place. The Pics I accidentally had my camera set to the lowest possible image size so the pictures aren't of the best quality unfortunately. I was hoping to make it back there to reshoot the place but haven't got round to it yet, I might return now that I have a wide angle lens. Hope you enjoy.... 1. The front of the main building 2. A mosaic on the floor in the staff quarters 3. The lobby of the secure unit 4. Corridor in the secure unit with just empty rooms 5. The tops of the toilet doors were slanted to stop people from attaching something to hang themselves with 6. Warped mirror....seeing your reflection in this probably wouldn't help your state of mind one little bit 7. 8. We then ventured into the basement and found this sign on a door.... 9. Filing units where records were stored.... 10. The original Victorian brickwork foundations 11. The staff bike sheds still look brand new.... 12. Once inside the main building we immediately found ourselves in the impressive great hall which was used as a canteen, I really needed a wide angle lens to capture this properly 13. 14. This corridor led from the hall to the kitchen 15. Kitchen 16. The rest of the main building consisted mainly of corridors with private bedrooms 17. 18. Windows with blinds, curtains and blinds being practically the only thing left behind 19. More corridors, bedrooms and other bits.... 20. 21. Birthday card from a relative to a patient 22. One of many intact bathrooms 23. Patient accomodation kitchen 24. Colourful ward 25. Another corridor with rows of doors 26. Inside the attic with an especially creepy looking gate for an entrance 27. And finally, a few exterior shots showing some of the outer buildings 28. 29. 30. The chapel built in 1858 Thanks for looking, I hope you enjoyed seeing inside Shelton!
  11. This one was fun and was worth the wait! At first we were having trouble getting in here, access that people had been using recently had been sealed but i'm not usually one to give up! Eventually after about an hour of hanging around i'd done it (thanks Miz Firestorm). I love a good climb! And people wonder why i'm called SpiderMonkey! History: For all their fame and social clout, the Harlechs seemed forever dogged by sadness, with three fatal car crashes, a suicide, financial distress and awful luck. The 46-year-old Tory peer is inviting offers of more than £5 million for the hall, considered to be one of the finest classical buildings of its generation. However, it has been abandoned for 15 years and before that it was used as a telephone exchange. Lord Harlech only inherited the title because his brother, Julian, committed suicide by shooting himself in a Fulham flat at 33. The circumstances were particularly tragic as his father, the ambassador to Washington who almost married Jackie Kennedy after her husband's assassination, inherited the title when his brother died after his car veered off a country lane, hitting a telegraph pole. The sixth baron's mother, Sylvia or "Sissie", died in 1967 when her car skidded on a wet road and hit another vehicle. In another terrible coincidence, his father died in 1985 in a similar crash. Since his father's death, Lord Harlech's life has been one long struggle to make ends meet. Shots: Cheers for looking! SpiderMonkey
  12. We left the house at 2am and arrived at our parking point just before sunrise, it was a mile walk across fields, over gates, fences and hedges to get to the place. The sun came up and as we browed the hill the Mansion hove into view, we had our entry point but stayed and took some externals before we made our way in. The place is quite dark inside and I set up my tripod and was snapping away when the word was that there was a alarm going off somewhere. We followed the sound to a locked door where the beeping was coming from. I took a couple of the stairs and we made our way back out closing our entry as we left. There was a bloke standing to the rear of the building but did not seam to be concerned, we didn't want to take the chance and just found our way back to the car (This time the long way around as he was standing on the path we came up.) Very few photos and mostly externals sorry. https://www.flickr.com/photos/cunningplan/sets/72157644337474437/ Our final View That's all sorry
  13. This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside. It's a really beautiful site, you could spend all day taking pictures in here and it's amazing to imagine people in the basement transmitting messages to our spies in Europe during the war. I had a strange feeling of sadness come over me as I was walking away from the place, difficult to explain why but it was a bit weird, I think perhaps I fell a little bit in love with the place. Massive thanks to Jones-y-Gog for inviting me to see this one and providing excellent company, cheers fella! The false door, everyone should have one of these!! This fireplace dates back to 1617, it even has the year carved into the wood. Thanks for looking.
  14. Hello all, after browsing some of the amazing places on here I now wish that I had a camera on me all the time just I case I come across anywhere of interest! I have been to a few but never taken pictures. I shall start snapping from now on!!
  15. Visited with my second favourite ginger woman,toby and wakey Brogyntyn Hall has stood abandoned for 15 years. was owned by the Lord Harlech until 2000. Settled in the 1600s the house and its estate once presided over the land as far as the eye can see. The family was one of the great English dynasties and owners of Harlech Castle in North Wales as well. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.
  16. My first post on here,so hope i dont mess it up,,,here are a couple of pics of a place i found yesturday in Shropshire....fully boarded from the inside,so no shots of internals unfortunatly...think it would be a belter though... Hope this works......
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