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Found 11 results

  1. The History, shamelessly ripped from Wiki The Bass Maltings in Sleaford, England are a large disused group of eight malt houses originally owned by the Bass brewery of Burton upon Trent. Constructed between 1901 & 1907 to Herbert A Coachman's design, the Maltings are the largest group of malt houses in England. They have been designated grade II on the National Heritage List for England, recognising them as "Particularly important.......of more than special interest". Part of the predominantly agricultural county of Lincolnshire, The Sleaford area was a major producer of barley in the 1880's. When germinated & dried to form malt, barley forms a key ingredient in the production of beer. Along with the town's railway links, this attracted the Bass brewery company to the town. The use of more efficient techniques at Bass's other plant led to the closure of the Sleaford's maltings in 1959. Despite being used to rear poultry in the late 20th century, the buildings have not been fully occupied since Bass left, & a fire in 1976 caused sever damage to three of the malthouses. Derelict since the 1990's, proposals to convert the buildings into office, retail & residential space were put on hold in early 2015, after lengthy delays in planning permission & the withdrawal of a major investor. The Explore We arrived at our car drop off point after what seemed like a never ending car journey, having travelled all the way from South East London. Feeling rather foggy in the head I cracked open a can of chemical waste & we got kitted up. We made our way over to the most obvious entry point, as it was still early & the chances of being seen were pretty slim. After seeing an abundance of palisade around we decided that this wasn’t going to be our way in, & quickly consulted our maps for an alternative. I had noticed some rather telling signs of entry from my consultation with Google the previous night, & so we figured a way to get to that side instead. Navigation was made difficult by the fact that there was a thick blanket of fog surrounding the whole town & it didn't seem to be lifting. Eventually we were on the right course, & things started to make more sense. On our travels we passed an old woman walking her dogs, we stopped & said hello. She asked what we were looking for, to which we turned to each other & I replied “We’re going to have a look at Bass Maltings, do you know the way from here?”. She obliged but gave us a heads up that you can’t get in. We grinned at each other & said “we know”. It was rather amusing! Our entry point after this was pretty straight forward, having to negotiate our way around some piss poor attempts to plug up gaps in the fence……...I mean come on! This was lackluster to say the least!! We got ourselves into the end building, & on first inspection it seemed pretty bare & dull. We made our way up to the first floor, which is where it started to get a bit more interesting. There were lots of fine architectural details, like ornate cast pillars & exposed wooden beams. The heady mix of fog, strong dawn sunlight & soft ambient light made for some difficult but rewarding conditions (as you can see from the light shaft photos). We made our way up the floor levels, with each ascension being more precarious than the last. The buildings have over time, suffered some quite severe water damage in places, so we had to tread carefully. Eventually we made our way down & tried to get into the other buildings. Entry to the other 7 malt houses was tough, with every ginnel being blocked off by tall gates & barbed wire. We had to basically weave our way through, finding openings from one building to the next. This only got us so far, & we then came to a dead end. After a bit of creative thinking & I figured out a weakness in one of the gates, & used some brute force to get my way over the top of it. I was very cautious at this point, because I was now in plain view of the neighbouring housing estate. I went off to scout out the way, leaving Scarlet behind. After I did a number on one of the gates further down, I came back & gave her the green light. We then quietly (well as quietly as we could) made our way up & over. We were now close to our main goal, which was the water tower. After fighting through some rather thick foliage we were at the front door. To our disappointment it wasn’t quite the walk in that we had seen from the videos. The door was blocked, with only a gap at the top of it. Someone had kindly left something to stand on, which made things a bit easier. Unfortunately Scarlet wasn’t able to make it up there, despite my attempts to help. She told me to go alone, as she knew that I was really looking forward to seeing it. I carefully made my way over the top, & as soon as I got down the other side, I turned around & there it was…….that staircase. It was even more beautiful than I had seen in the pictures, & it was made even better with the shafts of light that were pouring in from the side window. I took a moment to absorb the atmosphere, then I proceeded to climb the spiral stairs. Being on my own at this point, & doing something which was quite precarious, my nerves started to set in. This only got worse when I saw the upper stairways that I had to climb. They were all wood, & as I stepped on them they began to creak like hell. I was holding on to a banister that was also made of wood, knowing that if these steps gave way it would offer me no protection whatsoever. I will admit that I was pretty scared at that point. I got to the top level, & carefully made my way onto the metal gantry to the port hole ladder. I assessed the size of the opening & realised that I would need to leave my bag & tripod behind, as the space was very tight. I made my way up through the long tube (which I found out later was the centre of the water tank, thanks Maniac). I arrived to an open port hole at the top, & was presented with a truly spectacular view. From this high vantage point you could literally see for miles, & with the sun beaming down it made for a perfect setting. I knew that at this point I was very exposed, with potentially the whole town being able to see me. But to be quite frank I couldn’t give a shit, I knew it was one of those special moments which had to be savoured. I sat around for a little while, taking it all in before I made my way back down. By this time it was getting on & we needed to make tracks, knowing that it would probably take another 4+ hours to get home. We retraced our steps through the fields in the calm sunset & reflected on what had been a very fruitful explore. Explorer credits also go to my Mrs & partner in crime Vixxie. The pics, sorry there are so many
  2. The Explore Visited with Urbexbandoned We decided to do some local Lincolnshire stuff one weekend a few months ago. I was glad to re-visit this place to see some of the bits that I hadn't seen on previous visits. Turned out to be well worth the visit as the first of the eight large buildings that had been been previously sealed turned out to be one of my favourite parts to photograph and was good to see some other little bits like the top of the tower, which i missed last time as the little wooden door at the top of the spiral staircase had been nailed shut. No sign of the remote secca and in and out unnoticed which is how i like it The History (Stolen from myself) The years of beer Designed specifically to facilitate three key stages in the production of beer, the Sleaford Bass Maltings represent both a practical and architecturally pleasing group of buildings. Covering a geographical area of just over 13 acres, and comprising some 500,000 sq ft of floor space, the Sleaford Bass Maltings cost around £350,000 to complete. Standing against a backdrop of flat landscape, this impressive complex can be seen for many miles, its eight massive malt houses, central water tower, and tall chimney dominating the skyline. Production was under way in September 1906 and fully operational by the following year. Throughout the first half of the 20th century production continued at a pace but, by the end of the Second World War, had declined to such an extent that many of the buildings had become redundant. While other trades rented some of the unused space, the malt industry continued to decline until, in 1959, production finally ceased. Just a random fact... "In addition to their wages, workers were given three free pints a day!", If only I was born 50 years earlier.... Chicken and Veg In 1973 the Sleaford Bass Maltings were purchased by a local firm, GW Padley (Property) Ltd who utilised it for chicken rearing and vegetable processing, but the chicken rearing came to end during the 1990s when approval was given for residential development of adjacent land. The Blaze Considered to be of special architectural and historical interest, the Sleaford Bass Maltings were Grade II listed in 1974, only to suffer considerable damage two years later when a severe fire spread through the central area. Found this warning too on english heritage... NB Please note that this site is not currently open to the public. Tours are sometimes arranged by the Sleaford Maltings Group for heritage open days and other similar events.... The Pictures 1. Phone pano... 2. 3. 4/5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Urbexbandoned getting the shot... 14/15. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  3. Went back for another look with FatPanda, Raz & Jord Hopefully i've got some new interesting shots and not the same old same old! Bit of History; The Bass Maltings in Sleaford, England are a large disused group of eight malt houses originally owned by the Bass Brewery of Burton upon Trent. Constructed between 1901 and 1907 to Herbert A. Couchman's design, the maltings are the largest group of malt houses in England; they have been designated Grade II* on the National Heritage List for England, recognising them as "particularly important ... of more than special interest." Part of the predominately agricultural county of Lincolnshire, the Sleaford area was a major producer of barley in the 1880s. When germinated and dried to form malt, barley forms a key ingredient in the production of beer. Along with the town's railway links, this attracted the Bass brewery company to the town. The use of more efficient techniques at Bass's other plant led to the closure of Sleaford's maltings in 1959. Despite being used to rear poultry in the late 20th century, the buildings have not been fully occupied since Bass left and a fire in 1976 caused severe damage to three of the malthouses. Derelict since the 1990s, proposals to convert the buildings into office, retail and residential space were put on hold in early 2015 after lengthy delays over planning permission and the withdrawal of a major investor. Few more For those who care heres a vdeo walkaround i spent quite some time making; http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9746-Sleaford-Bass-Maltings-Walkaround Thanks for looking
  4. Went for a revisit to an old favourite at the weekend - only took about 10 pics but i made a lengthy video Press HD - Enjoy Thanks for looking
  5. Explored with Raz & 2 non members Background; The Bass Maltings in Sleaford, England are a large disused group of eight malt houses originally owned by the Bass Brewery of Burton upon Trent. Constructed between 1901 and 1907 to Herbert A. Couchman's design, the maltings are the largest group of malt houses in England; they have been designated Grade II* on the National Heritage List for England, recognising them as "particularly important ... of more than special interest." Part of the predominately agricultural county of Lincolnshire, the Sleaford area was a major producer of barley in the 1880s. When germinated and dried to form malt, barley forms a key ingredient in the production of beer. Along with the town's railway links, this attracted the Bass brewery company to the town. The use of more efficient techniques at Bass's other plant led to the closure of Sleaford's maltings in 1959. Despite being used to rear poultry in the late 20th century, the buildings have not been fully occupied since Bass left and a fire in 1976 caused severe damage to three of the malthouses. Derelict since the 1990s, proposals to convert the buildings into office, retail and residential space were put on hold in early 2015 after lengthy delays over planning permission and the withdrawal of a major investor. The Explore Some proper good fun, as you near the maltings you cant exactly miss it. i'd go as far as to say it dominates the relitively flat lincolnshire landscape. once your in your greeted by some really quite pleasing mill style rooms with a view and a half from the top. Only way from one building to another is using some rotten old walk ways situated pretty damn high up! these walk ways run from one end of the row to the other so you can cross it easy, providing you have the nerve! The central building has to be the best with its impressive spiral stair case! If you got this far, thanks for reading
  6. I think we all know and love this place so ill try and keep it short and sweet. A nice long re-visit to this place with zero. We was lucky and clever enough to get in 90%+ of this place, lots of dodgy climbing, balancing and ripped clothes was worth it. Designed specifically to facilitate three key stages in the production of beer, Bass Malting's is a Grade II* listed complex built between 1901 and 1907 that consists of nine parallel ranges. The central block with its engine house and water tower is flanked by six-storey malt houses on either side and occupies a site of 13.3 acres with a frontage almost 1,000 ft long. Malting's operations ceased in 1959 and the buildings were subsequently used for poultry farming and vegetable processing. Every year is meant to be progress for regeneration, all that happens is fires, vandalism, red tape from councils and company's whilst she continues to deteriorate. Developers say they are still committed to transforming Sleaford’s iconic Bass Malting's buildings, despite one of the key partners pulling out of the project. Avant Homes, which owns the Grade II Listed structure, is sticking to its original proposals to transform the buildings into a mixed development of residential, healthcare and community facilities, but the developers say the progress of the redevelopment will be delayed. The plans were dependant on a new road from Boston Road to Grantham Road being built, which supermarket giant Tesco had agreed to pay for as well as building a brand new superstore for the town. When and what happens next is anyone's guess. I love exploration and everything that goes with it, well apart from doing reports, FB, websites etc. Ill try my best to improve on this in 2015. Hope you enjoyed the report.
  7. Sleaford Bass Maltings One of those days when you find yourself with exploration withdrawal symptoms and it's too late to find a partner in grime. So I decided to take the short drive to sleaford solo to check out this huge complex. I was "going in dry" so to speak, with only some google maps printouts, a ginsters pasty, a scotch egg, and a determined mind. A little bit of fog helped maintain ninja infiltration, a mental note was made to add kevlar shreddies to my kit. For those of you that have been here before, you'll know that it's a bit of a ball-ache (literally) due to the fact that each of the eight massive buildings are sectioned off from each other resulting in a lot of climbing in and out mid-explore. Despite this, I thoroughly enjoyed having a mooch around here for about 5 hours, the spiral staircase room and the tower above is obviously one of the main attractions, and the upper floors of the fire damaged buildings require the use of your little ballerina shoes The history The years of beer Designed specifically to facilitate three key stages in the production of beer, the Sleaford Bass Maltings represent both a practical and architecturally pleasing group of buildings. Covering a geographical area of just over 13 acres, and comprising some 500,000 sq ft of floor space, the Sleaford Bass Maltings cost around £350,000 to complete. Standing against a backdrop of flat landscape, this impressive complex can be seen for many miles, its eight massive malt houses, central water tower, and tall chimney dominating the skyline. Production was under way in September 1906 and fully operational by the following year. Throughout the first half of the 20th century production continued at a pace but, by the end of the Second World War, had declined to such an extent that many of the buildings had become redundant. While other trades rented some of the unused space, the malt industry continued to decline until, in 1959, production finally ceased. Chicken and Veg In 1973 the Sleaford Bass Maltings were purchased by a local firm, GW Padley (Property) Ltd who utilised it for chicken rearing and vegetable processing, but the chicken rearing came to end during the 1990s when approval was given for residential development of adjacent land. The Blaze Considered to be of special architectural and historical interest, the Sleaford Bass Maltings were Grade II listed in 1974, only to suffer considerable damage two years later when a severe fire spread through the central area. Found this warning too on english heritage... “NB Please note that this site is not currently open to the public. Tours are sometimes arranged by the Sleaford Maltings Group for heritage open days and other similar eventsÂâ€..... 1. 2. External taken on a previous recce 3. Double Negative 4. Malt room reflections 5. 6. Stairing downwards 7. Spiral tap 8. 9. Windows, very nice ones.. 10. 11. Looking back from the spiral stairs 12. Above those stairs 13. One of the many death defying adjoining walkways 14. Looking up.. After not having my camera out of the bag for over 4 months for various reasons, I made a revisit with Session9 in November to try to get back into it. We had a quick mooch around a couple of the main buildings and the central area. Most of my pics turned out cack, but i managed to pick out a couple of average ones, shown below.. 15. 16. 17. 18. Surveying the damage caused by a fire at the end of the summer. 19. Rooflections 20. 21. Just a random fact... "In addition to their wages, workers were given three free pints a day!", If only I was born 50 years earlier.... As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated.
  8. Ferdowse Clinic, also known as Heckington Manor. Nice to tick this one off the bucket list, explored in the company of an urbex instagram buddy. Was supposed to be an earlier explore but due to a last minute piss-up on the Friday night I was a broken man in the morning and had to reschedule til the afternoon. A shabby drive later and we arrived and quickly made our access..... Some History..... stolen from the interweb... This wonderful looking property was built in the 1800's as a manor house and eventually became the only residential clinic for alcoholics within the Lincolnshire area. Dr Mostafa Morsy, a specialist of addiction treatment, spent around £300,000 bringing the former Heckington Manor up to scratch and opening a successful private practice for the treatment of alcoholism in the late 1980s. In 2003, the government had drastically cut funding for this sort of treatment and Dr Morsy had no other option other than to close the doors of his pride and joy. Since being disused, the property has been vandalised heavily and now sits waiting for a new owner. 1. 2. This room was pitch black, thanks to a mate for the equipment for this shot 3. 4. 5. A sad way to spend Christmas Eve 2000 (No surnames appear on the paperwork) 6. One of the residential drying-out apartments.. 7. Peely shitter 8. 9. Randomness 10. 11. The stained glass window, nice to see one intact for a change. 12. 13. A sobering place to visit.. As always, feedback always appreciated. Thanks for looking!
  9. UK Bass Maltings Sleaford 2011

    History has been done and done again, didn't have much time here bloody shame !, we only scratched the surface and need to go back soon as but time was against us from the start..... if anyone is going here pm me please.....nick
  10. Another site we took in on our recent roadtrip. Had a bit of a twist this explore did. We'd been there about 2 hours and had worked our way down to the buildings closest to the entrance when we saw two police vehicles drive past the front of the buildings inside the compound - bugger that's not good. They seemed to circle and drive away again so we didn't think a lot of it and carried on. Then we noticed a party of around 10-15 people at one end of the carpark area out the front. Hmmmm, wonder what they're doing here? Turned out they were on an official tour of the site from the owners agent, obviously prosepctive buyers for the site which is still up for sale. Damn, we were cornered as there was pretty much no way out without being seen so we cautiously made our way into one of the buildings that offered a good view over the site and basically waited for them to bugger off. Had a close call at one point when they actually came into the bottom of the building we were in, luckily they didn't venture upstairs - hardly surprising given the state of the floors! History (Borrowed from elsehwere on 'tinternet) The Sleaford Maltings were established by Bass in 1901, with production beginning in 1906. There are 8 Malt houses, Drying Kilns, Boiler House, Beam Engine House, Water Tower and other Buildings. Originally the Maltings were designed to have 16 malt houses which would have been opposite the current eight and would have doubled the size of the complex. The malting's remained in production until 1958 when they were closed after changes to the way that malt was produced. The buildings went on to become a chicken farm / food process plant which ws closed following the construction of the neighboring housing estates. This place is pretty big, but quite trashed in parts which made exploring it interesting. There's substantial fire damage to some of the buildings, and the rest of the remaining ones are in a reasonably poor condition, floors are quite sketchy in most of the buildings. Pics: The water Tower/Engine house was the most interesting part really. Mainly because of the awesome Spiral Staircase. And the View from the top. This is the group of people who showed up while we were inside! Thanks for looking, Maniac.
  11. - http://www.sleafordmaltings.com/All history along with maps and plans etc can be found in link above. On with teh picktehz! The most awesome spiral staircase in the world ever! The last ladder Quick shot of the top Burnt out section Pretty solid considering age... kinda looks like smokes coming outta chimney, though don't let your eyes deceive you; you may be surprised to learn that the chimney is no longer functioning... Visiting again soon, as I'm not overly happy with these pics, anyway ta for looking, l8rz Shadow
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