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Found 8 results

  1. Visited on two occasions with a non-member. The first time round, we spent more time on the East side and completely missed the bunkers. We heard diggers and machinery, but never saw any hi-vis types. There were a fair few explorers milling about though, which gave it a sort of Upwood (but not as crap) vibe. My mate wanted to get a taste of the 'Eastern' weather. Safe to say it was pretty dismal this winter, although he avoided the worst of the snow in January. There was plenty of sludge and mud to go around though On our second visit we managed to get to the bunkers, but found that they were deceptively sealed. We saw less people this time round and realised that much more of the site is now rubble than we originally thought. Considering in its heyday it had over 500 buildings, I'd say there are only now a few dozen of the bigger ones left. We nearly bumped into the demo crew on site a couple of times, but the beauty of this site is that it's so big and there are so many places to hide that they're never going to catch you. Was it worth visiting? For sure. It feels like I've ticked another one off the list and the murals and size of the place really are the redeeming elements to an otherwise bland and fooked Cold War derp. Will it be worth visiting in the future? I very much doubt it. I think within a few months it will have had it, sadly. That said, I don't think the bunkers are going anywhere at least, so I'll keep an eye on them with regards to internal access when I pass by in future. My photos don't do any justice to the scale of the place. For that a drone would definitely be useful. The videos probably give more of an idea of the 'geography' of it all. Anyway on with the photos... Rubbish dump. The Soviets very often dumped their rubbish in pits. This is evident all over East Germany. We found old gas masks, NBC overshoes, milk churns, boot polish, the lot! We bumped into a super-bait, full camo clad German and his missus in this building. Steps in the cinema. One of many small, buried buildings in the woods. Writing on the door. Warhead bunker. Bunged up door. Didn't seem worth digging out as all the other doors were welded from the other side it seemed. Lenin mural... More murals... Videos. Includes other assorted East German and Polish derps from the past couple of months. May contain the odd angry Gopnik and Fietsopa quote or two. Ace couple of weekends all-in-all. Big ups and thanks to DD for providing decent company and lulz. Thanks for looking, SJ.
  2. The Blue Hospital (Nov 2014)

    Visited with a non forum member - This hospital is part of a large former military camp which was taken over by the Red Army in 1945 until they left in 1990. Since then it has sat empty, slowly decaying. In my time I've happily wandered around many abandoned places with no bother including 4 different asylums on my own but, I'm not kidding this place really gave me the creeps. Evidence on the walls of the unmistakable Soviet presence once here - Till next time....be seeing you!
  3. The old Soviet military camp is one of my favourite ones in Germany. It was built during the Nazi era and later used by the Red Army. After the fall of the Iron Curtain and the withdrawal of the Soviet troops from the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), the area has been abandoned. I´ve visited this place three times so far, because I´ve been so deeply fascinated by still finding so many authentical remnants of the past, and I´m sure there´s still more to explore.
  4. Czech Republic Soviet Rocket Base - Dec 2015

    Hi guys :), we have made video from abandoned soviet rocket base. Shot on night. Anandoned base is located near Bratislava(Slovakia) near from Austria, ex-USSR west border. Closed in 1989. Watch scary video here: Thanks for support our next video from abandoned hospital, so feel free to subsrcibe
  5. Germany 'The Lost City'(October 2015)

    1: 2: 3: 4: 5: Visited 'The Lost City', abandoned soviet base in former eastern Germany. Big location lot's to see and explore, we went back few days later when not seeing all on the first day. grts, Peter
  6. Evening all, A lot of photos here but more to process but I feel that this is the jist of the set so thought I'd do my first report in a while. I'm sure most of you are aware of the big group of people who travelled to the Ukraine for an epic trip - some from the forum and some not so I'll get on with the repo. Duga-3 (NATO reporting name Steel Yard) was a Soviet over-the-horizon radar system. It was developed for the Soviet ABM early-warning network. The system operated from 1976 to 1989. Its distinctive and mysterious shortwave radio signal came to be known in the west as the Russian Woodpecker. Two stations of Duga-3 were installed: a western system around Chernobyl and an eastern system in Siberia. This transmitter for the western Duga-3 is located a few kilometers southwest of Chernobyl (south of Minsk, northwest of Kiev). The receiver was located about 50 km northeast of Chernobyl (just west of Chernihiv, south of Gomel). The Soviets had been working on early warning radar for their anti-ballistic missile systems through the 1960s, but most of these had been line-of-sight systems that were useful for raid analysis and interception only. None of these systems had the capability to provide early warning of a launch, which would give the defenses time to study the attack and plan a response. At the time the Soviet early-warning satellite network was not well developed, and there were questions about their ability to operate in a hostile environment including anti-satellite efforts. An over-the-horizon radar sited in the USSR would not have any of these problems, and work on such a system for this associated role started in the late 1960s. Duga-3 could detect submarines and missile launches in all of Europe and the Eastern coast of United States. The first experimental system, Duga-1, was built outside Mykolaiv in Ukraine, successfully detecting rocket launches from Baikonur Cosmodrome at 2,500 kilometers. This was followed by the prototype Duga-2, built on the same site, which was able to track launches from the far east and submarines in the Pacific Ocean as the missiles flew towards Novaya Zemlya. Both of these radar systems were aimed east and were fairly low power, but with the concept proven work began on an operational system. The new Duga-3 systems used a transmitter and receiver separated by about 60 km. We were given over 2 hours to explore and split up to do what we wanted. Myself and a few others headed to the command centre at the bottom end of the site. I planned to visit this and work my way back up to the gates. Command Centre Fairly stripped out but some nice details found whilst running around this place Walking back from the Command Centre Some of the many murals on the walls and littering the site There was a fair bit to cover but I was told that the cinema, kindergarten and the gym were over to the far left of the site so with the hour or so to spare I made my way over to the kindergarten which was stacked high with old beds but the building itself plus the playground made for some nice shots. Kindergarten Theatre Gym The floor was extremely rotten here and only found that out when I was halfway across so a few shots and I left to go to the admin building on the opposite side. Admin building
  7. Soviet Sub Dec - 2012

    I think this was the most scariest thing i have ever done. A late night splore on a Russian sub. It involved knee deep mud and a dingy ride with one and a half oars. But Trog and SK done an amazing job. The sub itself was amazing, im glad i didn't bottle it but inside was so claustrophobic, i really dont know how people stay down there for so long. Splored with SK, Trog and peaches. Thanks for looking
  8. This has been on the to do list for god knows how long after negotiating the extremely muddy banks in the dark We found a secluded spot to inflate the Boat, with paddles at the ready & giggling like idiots we were off. Ship mates on this one was Trog ,Peaches & Lara SOVIET U475 NATO CODE NAME FOXTROT This Soviet Submarine of the Cold War era served in the Baltic Fleet. She housed a crew of 77 in her cramped interior. With a range of 30.000 miles top side 400 submerged She could carry 22 Torpedo's in her 10 tubes 6 bow 4 stern. She was decommissioned in 1994 Cheers for looking in
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