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Found 7 results

  1. History In 1880 the Canterbury Cricket and Athletics Sports Co Ltd. purchased 10 acres of land within an area known as the Lancaster Estate, for £2,841 (approximately £260 per acre). By 1905, however, the Canterbury Cricket Association became the sole owners of the grounds and remained so until 1911, when they once again became co-owners, this time with the Canterbury Rugby Union. Regardless, in 1919 parliament assumed control over the grounds and established the Victory Park Board to manage and undertake responsibility for its management. This change in ownership was principally a result of WW1 which left the club in severe financial difficulty, to such an extent that parts of the grounds were ploughed to farm potatoes in the hope that they would help raise funds to support the continued survival of the club. Nevertheless, under the management of the government the site was developed extensively over the subsequent years and the stands were constructed to hold a capacity of approximately 33,000. In 1995 an additional corporate stand was also constructed and fully completed. It wasn't until 1999 that the stadium moved from the Victory Park Board into the hands of JADE Stadium Limited, a company which was established to take over management of the facilities. Once again the stadium was developed further, increasing the overall capacity to roughly 38,500. The final redevelopments occurred in preparation for the 2011 Rugby World Cup, at a cost of $60 million, and the capacity was raised to 43,000. If the grounds had been fully completed it would have been the second largest stadium in New Zealand; second to Eden Park in Auckland. A final detail, for those wondering about the conflicting signs - indicative of a name entirely different to the 'Jade Stadium - in its final years, through sponsorship rights with AMI Insurance Limited, the facility briefly became known as AMI Stadium. Although it was primarily a rugby and cricket ground, over the years the stadium operated it has hosted a number of significant events ranging from various sporting events to a variety of concerts; Bon Jovi, Roger Walters, Meat Loaf, Tina Turner, U2, Dire Straits and Billy Joel, to name but a few. As the situation stands now, although the council had the stadium insured for $140 million, discussions are currently ongoing as the insurance company and engineers argue that the structure can be fully repaired and strengthened. The council suggest that it is uneconomical to fix the existing facility due to the extent of the damage in the land and surrounding stands. Our Version of Events And there we were, travelling through Christchurch, staring at the surroundings incredulously when we stumbled across AMI Stadium. Against the rest of the destruction this particular site stood superficially solid in its appearance, as something that should have been representative of a dominant symbol in a city aspiring to prosper. As we moved in for a closer look it was clear that the stadium had suffered a similar fate to the rest of the city, as the cracks within its frame suddenly became blatantly visible to the eye. Going along with the spontaneity of the moment we decided, contrary to the cameras and secca in the area, that we'd attempt to get into the stadium and absorb the magnificent views of the stands and former centre pitch. We were right in our decision to attempt it as the views and atmosphere inside the monolith were arresting. This is perhaps the only time I've sat in a stadium and taken in absolute silence, inciting a feeling that's a conflicting mix between fact and fantasy. Explored with Nillskill. 1: The AMI Stadium from The Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament 2: Access way to the pitch 3: AMI Stadium sponsorship sign 4: The bush on the pitch 5: Pitch maintenance vehicle 6: Walkway outside of stands 7: Express food and drink 8: Door twenty-four 9: Top floor walkway 10: The AMI Stadium overview 11: One hell of a lot of seats 12: The stadium and beyond 13: A view inside the restroom 14: Up on the lighting scaffolding 15: Lighting walkway 16: Lighting ladder (to the top) 17: Capturing a whole stand 18: The way out 19: Stands A-G 20: Seating with old barrier 21: Old turnstiles 22: Emergency equipment 23: The AMI Stadium stands 24: The rear stand 25: McDonalds sponsorship sign 26: Outside view of AMI Stadium
  2. This was my 1st ever explore. Not sure what the history of the building is or anything unfortunately as it was my wife that suggested going here together (she is so romantic lol). I'm sure this has been done soooooo many times by anyone that lives in the area but I'm really pleased at the photos I got of this place (I took about 200 in total!). I've also done some really nice edits too
  3. It doesn't get much more relaxed than wandering around this site, it's a walk-in with no security and is basically a playground for street artists. Apparently up until the end of last year the whole place was a tip until a street artist known as King Trev took on the task of clearing out the crap to make the place more accessible. Since then some of London's finest graffiti artists including Tizer & Mr Cenz have taken to the place and made it their own with their colourful styles. I believe it also gets used for airsoft every couple of weeks and next door there is a remote control car race track run by Nitro Heaven, apparently the biggest in London. They are currently in trouble for the illegal tipping of hundreds of tyres next to the sports centre which has caused fines running into the thousands. I couldn't find any history on when the building was built or abandoned unfortunately but then my research skills perhaps aren't the best. The building is just a shell pretty much but if you like graffiti it's a very cool spot to visit and changes frequently. Here's some pics Thanks for looking
  4. Visited this place back in Dec 2013 With West Park Hospital rapidly getting redeveloped this one is worth a few minutes if your passing. Couple of professional pool tables still left inside, and considering it was left abandoned around 2007 I'm surprised it's not a total wreck. Disturbingly a few signs of some paper being burnt, so hopefully the place doesn't go down that path. I'm Lucky management didn't refuse entry on this occasion
  5. Nortel acquired the Harlow laboratories, originally Standard Telecommunications Laboratories, in 1991 and continued to use the site for research and development in wireless telecommunication technologies. It was the site of Charles Kao's research in fibre optic communications. This is their employees sports and social club The Nortel Sports Club trophy cabinet, very similar to the Arsenal trophy cabinet due to the fact that they are both empty!!!
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