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Found 4 results

  1. HISTORY: Thanks for looking at my pictures, I hope you enjoyed them. Give my facebook page a like & follow if you want to see what else my friends and I get up too - 0151 Outdoors. E.
  2. footage and pics are taken from two quick visits. One in August and one in November 2016. Some stolen history......... In 2008 the farm was closed after concerns were raised about the welfare of the birds that were kept there. These included Harris hawks, red-tailed hawks, two emaciated European eagle owls and Lanner falcons. In 2005, nine eagle owls kept at the council-owned site were used in film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Since the farm was abandoned it has become a dangerous eyesore, and a meeting place for local kids and with evidence of drug taking on the site. Piles of rubbish litter the farm buildings, where slates have been stolen from the roof and fires have been started. In 2009 RATS president Paul Dainton called upon Wakefield Council to make the site safer after the buildings became too unsafe to be left as they were. In July 2010 the farm was sold at auction by Wakefield Council for £162,000, selling for almost double the guide price. It is unsure of what the new owners plan to do with site at present. info taken from www.stanleyhistoryonline.com Feedback welcome, still new to this.
  3. The Visit Quite a spare of the moment visit late one night when an old security guard told us the way in surprisingly.. For the scale and size of the building it was a bit of a disappointment as every floor was stripped bare and just rows and rows of columns.. may visit in daylight to see if it looks any different but heres some pics anyway The History Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse, (Stanley Dock, Liverpool, England) is a grade II listed building and is the world's largest brick warehouse. Standing 125 foot (38 m) high, the building was at the time of its construction in 1901, claimed to be the world's largest building in terms of area. The 14 storey building spans across 36 acres (150,000 m2) and its construction used 27 million bricks, 30,000 panes of glass and 8,000 tons of steel. The overall design is by A.G. Lyster, the Dock Engineer, but Arthur Berrington almost certainly played a part. The warehouse was a late addition to the Stanley Dock complex and was built on land reclaimed from the dock. Stanley Dock is accessible from the dock system or by barge from the Leeds and Liverpool Canal which enters under Great Howard Street bridge. With the decline of trade going through Liverpool, the warehouse fell into disuse in the 1980s and gradually into disrepair. More recently the building has featured in the Stop the Rot conservation campaign by the Liverpool Echo newspaper. Part of the ground floor of the warehouse is used for the Sunday Heritage Market. Various plans have been unveiled for the Tobacco Warehouse to be redeveloped into several hundred apartments as part of a larger development of the whole Stanley Dock site. The plans involve hollowing out the centre of the warehouse to create a garden-filled courtyard.
  4. This place has now been turn in to an Airsoft building so tyres everywhere and not much else apart from the main door. History - What is now known as The Stanley Tools Factory, Sheffield was built in the 1850’s. At the moment it is derelict awaiting refurbishment. It is 100,000 Sq.ft in size and is spread over a 4 floor factory and a 2 floor office block. Stanley Tools took over from the Chapman Brace and Drill Factory in 1937. The site has been used as a film set recently and has also been used for zombie experiences due to the size of the location.
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