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Found 8 results

  1. Empty since 1989 it's the sort of place that used to weigh sweets on scales.
  2. RAF Bicester Bomb Store – June 2014 Visited back in June with TBM, many delays have held me back lately sadly. #1 Bomb Stores #2 #3 Fuse Hut/Nissen Hut #4 #5 Bit derpy but lots of wartime history More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157645321524385
  3. UK Bomb store, (Visited June 14)

    This place has been on the list and put off again and again; obviosuly the tunnel sections have been sealed but the rest was accessible, Visted with Northern Geek and 2 other explorers... Background Following the apparent success of the design employed at Harpur Hill in Derbyshire, the air ministry decided to use the same technique, converting the eastern pit into an underground depot, but because of the great depth of the quarry the design was adapted to produce a structure with two floors throughout. The lower level and a conventional flat reinforced concrete ceiling which also formed the floor of the upper level which had an arched roof like that at Harpur Hill. Standard and narrow gauge railway lines entered the lower level of the depot through the original quarry access tunnels, while three electric lifts transported bombs to the upper floor. The deep pits to the west of the depot were later used for burning and dumping redundant and dismantled ordnance. Overhead protection was given by forty feet of broken slate. In response to pressure from the treasury efforts were made to cheapen and accelerate the construction of Llanberis, but unfortunately the cost cutting had disastrous consequences only six months after the depot was opened.On 25th January 1942, two-thirds of the structure collapsed within seconds under the weight of the overlaying backfill, completely engulfing a train of twenty seven wagons which was in the process of unloading. The collapse buried over 14,000 tons of bombs which at the time represented 14% of the total RAF stock. A court of inquiry concluded that faulty design was the principal cause of the failure; cracks were noticed in the structure as the building neared completion but these were attributed to minor defects rather than to a major and fatal miscalculation. The depot remained in use after the war but all functional stock was removed by March 1955 and the depot closed in July 1956. This wasn't, however, the end of the story. After the war there was long term activity at Llanberis, in the form of a small RAF detachment of bomb disposal people, patiently clearing dumped weapons. After the war large quantities of incendiaries were dumped into the pits, some water filled, to the rear of the main storage area.From 1969 onwards, the various pits and tunnels were progressively cleared. Members of the EOD Flight burrowed further and deeper into the debris and slate rubble to uncover such items as incendiary bombs and high explosive bomb detonators. The latter, together with the numerous bomb fuses, which were uncovered, were in an extremely hazardous condition and required careful handling. With the help of the Royal Engineers, roads were constructed into the more difficult pits. Royal Navy divers were co-opted to investigate the contents of a large lake in one of the pits as it was suspected that it might contain some explosive items. The divers reported that the bed of the lake was littered with explosive items including a number of large bombs. Subsequently, over 20,000,000 gallons of water and sludge were pumped out. By April 1973 the lake was emptied revealing everyone's worst fears; it took a further two years to recover and dispose of the explosive items revealed. Fortunately, this pit was one of those to which 38 Engineer Regiment, RE, had constructed a road, otherwise the task would have been impossible. On completion of the task, 71 Maintenance Unit EOD Flight had moved approximately 85,000 tons of slate and debris, recovered and disposed of 352 tons of explosive items together with 1,420 tons of non-explosive ordnance debris.
  4. Little disappointed with the selection! Now I know its not very exciting, but thought I would share anyway! (apologies for quality of photographs still stuck with damn mobile)
  5. Royal Arsenal Co-operative Society Department Store, Woolwich Out for a mornings Splore with Skeleton Key and Ninja Kitten and had a quick meet with UrbanX and Priority 7 The Woolwich Co-op is one of those places where you think to yourself "Should I bother setting my camera up?", it's absolutely trashed but there were still a few nice art deco features to be seen. The impressive department store occupies a prominent place on Powis Street, Woolwich. Built in 1938 By the Royal Arsenal Co-operative Society in the art deco style. The Royal Arsenal Co-op was founded by workers at the local royal arsenal in 1868, their principal aim was to provide reasonably priced food for local workers. The co-op developed and came to offer a range of services locally which included bookshops, chemists, undertakers, laundries, insurance and savings stamps clubs and a department store. The co-op was founded on on the democratic principals of one member one vote and paid a dividend to members. An old painted type postcard The store was to become a popular high street store for the next 50 years, selling clothing and housing a bank. The RACS experienced a period of decline in the 1980's and was eventually merged with the Co-operative Wholesale society, Who in turn became known in the Uk Simply as the Co-op. 1965 The exact date of closure is unclear, but it seems to have been empty from the early 2000's. The building is popular locally but is currently under threat from the local council who have plans to demolish and re-develop the site. Ornate Art Deco stairs led from level to level Up and up until we finally hit the roof On the 2nd floor we stumbled across the sad side of UE. From the front of the photo to the back was his worldly possessions. Bed, Dinner Table and Washing Line, the table showed an in date pork pie and a couple of other fresh bits. Time to go
  6. I have looked at a set of doors in a wall, in a car park, near my brothers flat. Every time I saw them I could not help bus wonder what lays behind. Well now I know,thanks to the fact my brother went to his car one morning and found the open door above. So in he went camera phone in hand and this is what he found. Due to the fact my brothers a lazy little shit, I am posting these for him, wish I had had the chance to have a look myself. but by the time I arrived someone had closed the doors. but are still none the wiser to the what? why? and when? of it all, and have a new question...what the hell are the big green things.
  7. MIss vd found this one not quite sure on what it is maybe a store of some form if anyone could shed some light on it please do my personal fav
  8. Visited this place with Lynton, Miss CSI, and SteAlTh last year, it has now been sealed up, but a interesting little explore, Enjoy the pics.My camera wasn't the best then, had a cheap old argos number, the others have better ones. The tiny hole we squeezed through. Lots of old bottles and rubbish lying about, we think that when pleasurama was on the site they used to put some of there stuff inside this place. Lots of carvings in the chalk. This was a nice easy explore.
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