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Found 9 results

  1. visited st josephs myself woopashoopaa and gronk this was our first stop of the day after we gained access we found it was now being inhabited by pidgeons and there was shit everywhere. the church and been pretty much stripped but was still worth a look. as the place hasnt been covered that much.just as we had left and crossed the road taking our externals the police turned up so made our escape to our next place so heres bit of history i found and a few pictures In October 1870, Father Henry J Lamon (see "St. Joseph's Clergy") was appointed head of the new mission that would soon become the Parish of St. Joseph, Wigan, and it was due to the untiring zeal and great energy of the new Rector that rapid progress was made. The first service was held on 22nd January, 1871, in a small chapel that formerly belonged to the Primitive Methodist Body, in Caroline Street, but in a very short time the building was found to be too small for the increasing numbers of Catholics living in the surrounding Wallgate area. Consequently, with the permission of the Right Reverend Doctor O'Reilly, Bishop of Liverpool, Father Lamon purchased some adjoining land to the chapel, at a cost of £500. The old Methodist chapel was then pulled down, and on the site was erected the first church of St. Joseph, which opened in April 1872. This new church was built to accommodate between 500 and 600 worshippers at a cost of £3,000 - a considerable sum at the time. At a further cost of £5,000, through the support of his faithful parishioners, by 1874, Father Lamon had built the schools at St. Joseph's, which soon had an average attendance of over 800 scholars! However, it soon became evident that the new church was totally inadequate for the requirements of the district, and steps were taken without delay for the erection of a more extensive building. NOTE: During his time at St. Joseph's, there was frequent correspondence between Father Lamon and the Bishop of Liverpool, regarding the possible acquisition of land around Caroline Street. Indeed, some of Father Lamon's letters to the Bishop, which are kept in the Archdiocesan Archives, suggest that the first Rector of St. Joseph's was most shrewd and business-like when dealing in such matters In due course, more land adjacent to the church was purchased, and the old premises were removed to make room for the building of a second new church! The design of the new St. Joseph's Church, the one that so many came to know and love, was entrusted to Mr. Goldie, of the firm of Messrs. Goldie and Child, of Kensington, London, and the contract, which amounted to about £6,000, to Mr. J. Wilson, of Wigan, with Mr. Weatherby acting as clerk of works. In 1877, the foundation stone was laid and blessed by the Right Rev. Dr. O'Reilly, and, together, with the adjoining Presbytery for the accommodation of three priests, the church was completed in 1878 and opened on Sunday, 30th June of that year. P
  2. So I had been told about this little school up north a while back and recently had the pleasure of visiting it. Split in to 2 sections, one for the girls and one for the boys with a great big wall down the middle I can only assume that being a schoolchild here and meeting a child of the opposite sex was like being like a kid in a sweetshop. It was infact an Infants school so probably didn't have my mindset Access was pretty easy, made our way in to the Girls side first and was a good job we were with it as there were no floors, we initially thought we were too late. We clambered over beams and made our way upstairs to have a look about, a few little bits to see but not much really. Conversion had begun. Came back down, went to the boys section again access was relatively easy, having a wander about and was pleasantly surprised. Whilst the girls side was in the state it was, this side was aside from other urbexers and vandals not too bad. Lots to see so out came the camera! The reason I called it Pigeon Street School is because I have literally never seen so much Pigeon shit in my life! This was no longer a resting place, it was a bloody hotel for the feathered rats!! Everywhere I leant, everything I touched it was Pigeon! I was covered in the shit, literally! But, Pigeons aside it was a good explore and there was lots to see. I have since been told it is undergoing complete restoration so relatively lucky with timing. Sorry if it's a bit pic heavy! Class room This room, well I absolutely loved it! The decay, the colours, the single chair. I must have spent a good 20 minutes alone in this room. I am pleased to say that I can read and know what these things are. A brief visit back to education taught me well. One of the corridors, lovely circular skylights beaming light in and on the floor is the toilet for pigeons! She wasn't in Class today! School's out! Where the pigeons hang their bags Reading time I got quite excited when I see these, I used to use them at school. I know.... easily pleased right! Another shot of that beautiful room Don't ask.... I just thought it looked cool! Another Corridor Residents One side of the school, Boys.
  3. So my first report - I haven't edited my latest stuff and who knows how long that will take, might as well start off somewhere There's a crane up near me and every time I go out I can't take my eyes off it. Just a couple of issues with said crane, it has lots of security measures all around it, added to that the building being constructed belongs to my ex-employers . . . and so began my crane fixation . . . Utterly fascinated, I really needed a crane in my life, it came to the point where I was dreaming about cranes - that's how sad it was I soon came across another crane, which looked very tempting. To be fair they are dotted all over town, it's just I never used to notice them before. Made some plans with a not so active member who knew his way round a tall structure. After two failed attempts we drove round trying to find others, I wasn't going to go home without climbing my first crane. As we were driving down I noticed the two cranes next to Chapel St. Pulled over and started looking for ways to get in. At one point it did seem impossible but soon enough we were in. I thought getting near the base of the crane was the hardest part until I started to climb the ladders - the never ending ladders that seemed to go on forever! As it was my first time, I was pretty knackered by the time I reached the top but that feeling of exhilaration and sense of achievement is worth every aching muscle . . . . Unfortunately for me the story doesn't end there We were up there for about an hour, just getting comfortable when we noticed a police car down the side of the road with its lights flashing. So we waited to see if it moves and whether its presence was just a pure coincidence. After a short time the police car is still there but now two fire engines are making their way up the other side of the road! after a few minutes it was becoming apparent that they were there for us . . . the police and the firemen stood at the side of the road looking up at us! with no options now left but to make our way down. They explained that some nosy bouncer from a local bar/pub thought there were some drunks up on the crane, brilliant! How ironic, I get the police turning up on my first crane. The police were very nice and friendly and just followed procedures before letting us go - they even commented how this brightened up their evening, making a change from what they usually have to deal with. A bit gutted my first visit was cut so short but it was an evening full of adventures and excitement and I loved every minute of my time at the top Some information regarding the construction from the net Chapel Street is at the centre of the £650m Salford Central project to revitalise the area with 1,000 new homes, shops, offices and a European-style plaza. The first major development at the Chapel Street regeneration area in Salford takes its name from a Vimto factory that was once nearby. The development of 83 apartments and 14 houses with the first homes being ready to move in to at the end of 2014 - early 2015 is adjacent to the Bell Tower pub will be called Vimto Gardens. The scheme is part of the Salford Central regeneration project, which is being delivered by the English Cities Fund (EcF), a joint venture between Muse Developments, Legal & General and The Homes & Communities Agency, in conjunction with Salford City Council. When complete, Salford Central, which is made up of two inter-dependent areas, Chapel Street and New Bailey, will create around 11,000 jobs, 220,000 square metres of commercial space, 849 homes and 390 hotel rooms. Thanks for looking
  4. Hello all! Well after managing to get out for a couple of hours, Tom Sherman decided we should try these flats which have been stripped out, and are awaiting refurbishment from my understanding. Not the most easiest of explores, as the roof is via a "loft hatch" rather than concrete stairs onto the roof. Can't find any history, and i presume they was built in the early 60's as they are a typical concrete tower block. Image taken from google street view ^ I would also like some adivce on how to make my images more "crisp" like a lot of other people manage. Is it me, the lens or everything Thanks!
  5. Info pinched off net.. Built in 1880 as Victoria Calvanistic Methodist Church but was sold to Liverpool Corporation in 1920. 1878: Foundation stone of a new Welsh Calvanistic chapel in Crosshall street, laid by John ROBERT'S esq M.P. in lieu of Pall mall chapel which was built in 1787 and taken down for railway extension Nov 27. The congregation moved there from their first chapel in Pall Mall. It was called the Victoria Chapel after the success of the Sankey & Moody evangelistic campaign held in 1875 in a large tent on Crosshall street called Victoria Hall. Size: 2163 - 11983 sq ft Price Guide: £1,500,000.00 The Chapel is a development opportunity for conversion into a boutique hotel, offices, restaurant or residential apartments. The existing buildings facade is Grade II listed and contains 12,283 sq ft spread across four floors. http://chapel-liverpool.co.uk/ Not much in here am afraid... Thanks... :thumbsup:
  6. For those who don't like street art look away now. Not much info to be found on tinterwebs during my 5 seconds of reserching. The site is pretty sizeable and bigger still before bits were demo'd and a big prison built right next door (think the land it's on also used to be part of the factory - but not 100% on that) Nice relaxed mooch - stripped to just bare buildings now but still a nice mooch, several shelters throughout the site and lots and lots of street art. As we were almost done I saw a figure coming on site in a white shirt .. fellow explorer ? No two G4S seccas from the prison next door. . They'd noted my car had been parked on the road for 4 hours and just wanted to check all was OK. On explaining what we were doing there they told us to carry on and bade us farewell - jolly nice chaps they were too. Visited with the man that some call ....... Zero81
  7. Nice place this! Visited with Fortknox0 Maniac Wevsky Obscurity and i cant remember for the life of me who else lol. Shame things have changed now as bits are cleared out... Thanks for looking!
  8. Well a quick trip but don't know what to make of the building !, old big house, mansion or poss small old nursing home !!!!! no history to be found even off the old drunk outside the bath hotel pub ! it's in the early stages of re development so on with the pic's
  9. I wanted to go here more for personal reasons than anything else. My mum grew up in Chelmsford, and she and her mum and a lot of their friends all worked for Marconi at different times. Well what can I say it sure is a mess - pikeys and graffiti artists have been at play here. Having said that if you move away from the factory floor areas and into the other areas, it's not actually too bad. It's totally stripped, hardly anything to show what it's purpose was which is a shame. Also it's huge - it really is a pretty big site, you don't realise until you're inside. There must be 4 very large factory floors, with several other large spaces as well as a 5 story high admin block, which although very samey does get better as you go higher. Then there's the very oldest part right at the front. Visited on the spur of the moment with Obscurity and his misses - cheers for a good day people It has to be said, this bit's pretty bland Amazingly all the glass is intact, but the ceilings trashed. Old meets new There's a few bits left I love the roof of this building. Reception area was pretty good, shame it's no where near as neat as it was in earlier reports, but it could be worse. The main lobby of the oldest part. Although it was trashed in parts, I thought it was a pretty good - it would have been fantastic to have seen it in it's prime. Maniac.
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